NROTC- Marine Option Help

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by KyleMullins45, Jun 27, 2013.

  1. KyleMullins45

    KyleMullins45 Member

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    I have put in my application for my NROTC- Marine Option scholarship. I am a well rounded individual, however my recruiter has suggested I do a Delayed Entry Program. Will this help my application look better? And if I am selected for the scholarship do I have any obligations for the inactive reserves?
     
  2. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

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    Sounds like he's just trying to get you to enlist. If your ultimate goal is to be an officer, no point in doing it, because the DEP is basically a fancy term saying you're waiting to ship out to go to boot camp to become an enlisted Marine.
     
  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    +1 to Melitzank! Do not do delayed entry.The recruiter is just trying to meet his quota. If you don't get a scholarship, consider doing NROTC MO as a college programmer and compete for a sideload (in school) scholarship while participating in the program. If that's not viable, consider doing the Platoon Leader's Program over two summers.
     
  4. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Agree with both responses. I have heard this "spin" before and just do not accept it as fact.

    I do not recommend the program as a means to make your application stronger
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Just remember that a recruiter's job is not get officer's to join, but to get enlisted personnel enter.
     
  6. KyleMullins45

    KyleMullins45 Member

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    I know he's trying to meet a quota, but he said I am not required to enlist, and upon acceptance (hopefully) of an NROTC scholarship, there are no further obligations to this program. I know it's not the traditional thing to do, but my thoughts are that it will help prepare me for the school I want to attend (VMI). Is there anything negative to come out of this is my main question?
     
  7. Melitzank

    Melitzank Member

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    If you enter the DEP, it means you've enlisted. I'm not sure if you could back or or not before your ship date arrived, that's something I'm sure the others know the answer to, but in my opinion there's nothing to be gained by doing it. In the DEP you just work out and go to poolee functions, and I don't see how that'd help you get ready for VMI.
     
  8. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Kyle: You sign a contract with DEP - it is a delayed entry program for up to one year. I don't know ALL the particulars but you can "request" a release for any reason and you are contractually released if you go into another enlistment program (ROTC for instance).

    EVERYONE who enlists participates in DEP - whether it is one week or 52 weeks. No one signs the papers and departs for boot camp. So there is always a group of poolies waiting to go to boot camp and working with the recruiting station to get prepared.

    If you intend to go to college next year, why sign a contract indicating you will join the Marines via the enlisted programs? Most recruiting stations are happy to have interested high school students work out with the poolies (they hope to convince them to join if they seem like viable candidates)

    I don't have first hand knowledge of the intracacies of the DEP and won't have time to research in the near future. But I encourage you to rethink your approach. If you sign an contract and get ROTC you will be released. What are the odds of getting a NROTC scholarship? What happens if you don't get the scholarship? How easy it to break your contract and just go off to college?

    A good course of action may be to speak to the local OSO (Officer Selection Officer) or call/ visit a local NROTC college staff to ask your questions. Then you can eliminate the stigma of a recruiter who is just trying to make his quota and get information from people who aren't held to that goal.
     
  9. enived2

    enived2 Member

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    In 2011 DS was in the delayed entry program. He received a Marine Option NROTC Scholarship and was released from DEP. My DS's biggest desire is to be a Marine Officer. He was going to enlist then try the MECEP program for his college education. The recruiter suggested he apply for the MO scholarship because his academics were so outstanding. The recruiter also said being in DEP would help his application, but I don't believe that is true. It is a ploy. While DS waited on the results of his scholarship application he attended all poolee functions and physical training. It really helped him in preparation for the PFT. DS WANTED to be in the DEP and signed on with full knowledge. We are all thrilled that he got the scholarship and is attending college now. He will be a 2nd class midshipman (junior) in the fall. He is at USMC Mountain Warfare Training right now. It has been a great experience. Just keep in mind that DEP is ENLISTMENT. If that is not what you want to do, do not sign. There are many ways to become an Officer of Marines if you do not get a scholarship.
     
  10. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Here is one negative.

    If you are not selected for the NROTC MO Scholarship then guess what, your enlisting in the Marines.

    Follow the advice that's been given, if you want to go to college and become a Marine officer then focus on that. Like others have said there are options if you do not receive a scholarship.
     

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