NROTC Nagging Questions...

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Trailblazer, Sep 14, 2015.

  1. Trailblazer

    Trailblazer New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    2
    I have a few questions concerning the NROTC scholarship:

    First off, about the Applicant Fitness Assessment- I can pass the pushup and situp components, but my mile time is a laughable 10:30 :biglaugh: My academic/extracurricular profile is great, but the only thing holding me back from an A+ application is my mile time. Should I wait a couple months to improve my fitness level, or go ahead and submit those scores so I can meet the first board and just see what happens?

    My thing is, I'm planning on attending Auburn in the fall, and I really want a scholarship to Auburn- it's my first choice and in state, and even if I don't get a scholarship there I will probably just join the program as a regular cadet (I know I'm being stubborn, but it's my dream school). Will my chances of getting into Auburn's program on scholarship improve if I submit everything to the board now, or wait a couple months to get my mile time down and pray slots don't fill up?
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,545
    Likes Received:
    1,005
    Well that depends. If you're really going to apply yourself in a consistent way,work hard following a well known and successful run training plan, then I would wait in anticipation of real improvements. If you're not going to do that then you might as well submit them now. Also, remember the early boards award scholarships to those that walk on water. Do you walk on water?

    Remember this is a competition. They don't just look at your application and say "Yeah, he deserves one". Instead they say "Who are the best 50 (or whatever) we have to award scholarships from this board?".
     
  3. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    2,446
    The run is one you can work on for a month and drop that time by 2 minutes to be honest. You know how to use Google, you find this site. Now find a training plan that is suited for that distance on the Internet. Once you complete that and finish the test then find one for 3-5 miles of training as you will need that for ROTC. First off, you will be a Midshipmen, not a Cadet. Small thing, but details matter in the military. To be honest with a 10:30 I am not sure that would be a passing score for an applicant. Kinnem brings up very valid points.
     
    bucketheadsdad likes this.
  4. Trailblazer

    Trailblazer New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    2
    Midshipman, my apologies. I've been called a cadet for three years in AFJROTC, so it's a transition.
    I honestly have no idea how to go about this- I have no idea what goal pace I need or how many intervals of what I need to do. I was just planning on running a mile every day until I got my time down. Any suggestions?
     
  5. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    2,446
    Have you talked to your instructor, gym teacher or track coach at school? Google, has a million training plans for training to run a mile and beyond. All are options to help you.
     
  6. Trailblazer

    Trailblazer New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    2
  7. zachcleigh

    zachcleigh Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2015
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    40
    Best way to get better at anything is to do it. You want to drop your mile time? Go run.
    Every second you spend on the computer looking for the best ways and "cheats" the internet has to offer, is a second you are not using to improve yourself.
    Personally for my run time i: Run the 1.5 mile for time 2 times a day, every other day. And then the days in between i run 4 400m for time and 4 100m for time.
    Mix sprints and long distance
     
  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,545
    Likes Received:
    1,005
    Zachleigh is quite correct that any good program is going to have you running sprint intervals as well. It really does help your long distance run time believe it or not. Isn't the test 1.5 miles?
     
  9. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    2,446
    Speed work helps. Also, remember to run through a practice PT test every week or so. Just running it is only a gauge, but to do it after you have exerted yourself on the push ups and sit ups is different. Interval work is great. After you bring that run time down for the one mile, focus on 3 miles and eventually to 5. If this isn't your strength practice with the track team.
     
  10. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,545
    Likes Received:
    1,005
    Never mind. Just looked it up and it is 1 mile.

    BTW - we are all assuming you're applying Navy option based on your comments. Is this correct?
     
  11. Trailblazer

    Trailblazer New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    2
    Yes, I am applying Navy option :)
     

Share This Page