NWL Only From Congressional Noms?

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by SanDiegan, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. SanDiegan

    SanDiegan Member

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    I apologize if this has been covered somewhere but I haven't been able to locate a definite answer. Reference is often made to the "NWL" or "National Waiting List". Does anyone know the exact sources that this list draws from? Is it only congressional nominees who who didn't receive appointment based on their congressional nomination, or does it also include other categories, specifically including ROTC / JROTC nominees who are not among the 20 appointed nationally based on that category?

    We live in a competitive district in California, and our MOC (perhaps like many) will only nominate to one academy. Our DS received a congressional nomination to USAFA (unranked) but did also receive a nomination to USMA through his participation in his school's JROTC "Honors Unit with Distinction" Unit. We're wondering how big of a pool he's in at this point.

    Thanks too all for the great info on this forum!
     
  2. WienerDog

    WienerDog West Point Class of 2018

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    From what I've been reading, it looks like there will be 150 - 200 drawn from the NWL. Apparently there are still another 400 - 500 offers coming between now and May. Not including 200 to USMAPS. Someone posted earlier, every week the academy draws another 30-60 appointments to get their BFE's. Good Luck and throw some prayers up...Ive been !!!!
     
  3. 845something

    845something Member

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    The short answer is they must have a nomination from a MOC to be considered for a Qualified Alternate spot of the NWL but could be an Additional Appointee - though this is far less likely as USMAPS, athletes, and other class composition goals use most of these spots which are far fewer when the class size decreases.

    From Title 10:
    " Each Senator, Representative, and Delegate in Congress, including
    the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, is entitled to nominate
    10 persons for each vacancy that is available to him under this
    section. Nominees may be submitted without ranking or with a
    principal candidate and 9 ranked or unranked alternates. Qualified
    nominees not selected for appointment under this subsection shall
    be considered qualified alternates for the purposes of selection
    under other provisions of this chapter."

    And

    " (5) 150 selected by the Secretary of the Army in order of merit
    (prescribed pursuant to section 4343 of this title) from
    qualified alternates nominated by persons named in clauses (3)
    and (4) of subsection (a)."

    Sections (3) and (4) refer to the MOC

    "(3) Ten cadets from each State, five of whom are nominated by
    each Senator from that State.
    (4) Five cadets from each congressional district, nominated by
    the Representative from the district."

    On Additional Appointees:
    "If it is determined that, upon the admission of a new class to
    the Academy, the number of cadets at the Academy will be below the
    authorized number, the Secretary of the Army may fill the vacancies
    by nominating additional cadets from qualified candidates
    designated as alternates and from other qualified candidates who
    competed for nomination and are recommended and found qualified by
    the Academic Board. At least three-fourths of those nominated under
    this section shall be selected from qualified alternates nominated
    by the persons named in clauses (2) through (8) of section 4342(a)
    of this title, and the remainder from qualified candidates holding
    competitive nominations under any other provision of law. An
    appointment under this section is an additional appointment and is
    not in place of an appointment otherwise authorized by law."
     
  4. MO-KonMOM'17

    MO-KonMOM'17 New Member

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    Hello 845something!
    I have been reading a lot on the forum but this is my first actual post. In reading your short & long I'm wondering if you could help me understand a little futher. So I can be sure I have it right.

    A Senator is able to nominate 5 candidates in their state
    Each congressional district has 5 nominees nominated by the Representative of that district

    Then under additional appointees it mentions "vacancies" and"alternates", does that mean a vacancy can be filled by an alternate from another state/district if they met ranked in order by merit? Meaning, if they didn't cut the mustard in their own state or district it may be possible to fill a slot elsewhere if they are ranked high enough...

    Thank you!
     
  5. 845something

    845something Member

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    Not quite -
    Each MOC has 5 appointments TOTAL, not each year. They use like 1 per year, some maybe 2. This translates to approximate spots/vacancies at the Academy:

    600 for MOC
    100 for Presidential
    20 for ROTC
    15 for S/D of Disabled/Deceased Vets
    25 for the Supt (per last years BOV notes)
    85 Active Soldiers
    85 Guard/Reserve Soldiers
    150 Qualfied Alternates
    That comes to 1050 - the Additional Appointees are everything up to the final class size of 1200 or approximately 150, many of whom will be from the 200 in USMAPS graduating this spring.
     
  6. GoBlue1984

    GoBlue1984 Member

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    One Candidate Can't be Charged Elsewhere

    No. A candidate cannot fill a vacancy of an MOC in one nomination slate, if he or she was not nominated to that slate. An "alternate" is someone who was nominated but did not the have the primary nomination or win the nomination in a competitive slate. Think of nomination slates like a van: you have to get out of the van you came in.

    A ranked slate goes in order top to bottom. The highest ranked candidate that is 3Q gets the appointment. A competitive slate is selected by the academy from all nominated candidates who are 3Q. An un-ranked alternate slate is chosen by the academy if the primary and alternate (if named) are not 3Q or decline the appointment.

    If an MOC has more than one vacancy (of the 5 concurrent available) open for their district, the academy can select multiple nominees from the slate.

    All 3Q nominated candidates not selected for their nomination slate end up on the NWL.

    It is possible for an MOC to not have any qualified nominee. In that case the vacancy is left unfilled for that year and it becomes an additional vacancy for the following year.

    The language around NWL is that they must select at least 150 candidates by WCS and then up to "X" additional candidates to make up the goals of the Academy or needs of the Army not necessarily by WCS.

    There is a post floating around with a link to a PDF that really explains the process. If I can find it, I'll post a link for you.
     
  7. MO-KonMOM'17

    MO-KonMOM'17 New Member

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    GoBlue1984,
    That was pretty a good explanation. Thank you. Between these two posts and all the reading I've done, I get it. At least, what I am able to without knowing the ranking order, how many candidates actually applied in a district/state, and how many vacancies are available. Those are the magic numbers that make the equation more (or less) of a mystery.

    Thanks again for sharing your knowledge!
     

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