PT Training

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by parkerafrotc2, May 4, 2011.

  1. parkerafrotc2

    parkerafrotc2 Member

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    Just finished last final of the semester and I am ready to get started training for my PT test in August. What would be a good training program?

    Thanks

    Zach Parker
     
  2. Bullet

    Bullet Member

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    Well, let's see...

    Your PT test will include a timed run, push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups, and basketball throws.

    So the obvious first piece of advice: do those things, A LOT of those things.

    Second piece of advice: run, A LOT! Then run some more.

    If your serious about getting in the best shape for your PT test, make the time to do PT at least 6 days a week for at least an hour. Work your way up to 3-4 miles runs at least 3 times a week, and do sprints at least once a week, and a long run (5-7 miles) once a week as well. Push-ups, sit-up, and pull-ups EVERY DAY. Core exercises at least 3 times a week as well. Upper body strength weight training at least twice a week (i.e chest, shoulder, back, and bi's / tri's)

    Last piece of advice: get your rest as well. Nothing will hurt your performance more than not getting enough rest to recover.

    Oh, and don't work out the day prior to your PT session. Better yet, rest 2 days beforehand!

    Other than that, it's all up to you and your level of dedication...
     
  3. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    Bullet...what PT test are you taking...Basketball throws and pullups?? the AF ROTC PT test consists of 1 minute of pushups, 1 minute of curl ups, and a 1.5 mile run. I don't even think you need to prepare for that, but if you do a couple sets of pushups every other day, some curlups every day, and run once or twice a week you should be fine.
     
  4. Bossadai

    Bossadai Member

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    IIRC, the basketball throw is the part of the physical fitness test a person takes when applying to the Naval Academy. It may be used somewhere else, but as far as I'm concerned...

    Anyways, what I'd do to work out...was pretty much already said. Start by running every other day. Go one mile for a couple of days, then two, then three...don't raise your mileage until you can consider what you're doing currently as "too easy". You'll be surprised how easy it is to run long distance...if you consistently practice!

    True story, when I was a senior in high school, and got on a "preparing for military PT" high, I would run all the time...until I'd wake up with sore legs. Then I wouldn't run for a day (quite understandable, as you should let your legs rest)...but I would keep from running many days after that. And guess what...if you don't run...you lose it! Try running 3 miles at a good pace, then completely stopping for just a week, then running the same pace again...hard, huh? The same principle applies to pull-ups, pushups, situps, etc...basically any action in life that requires practice. :)

    But I digress. Once you get your long distance endurance down, start changing it up, like randomly sprinting a good length during a run. It's impossible to not improve if you are consistent and flexible in your running regime.

    Anyways, that just covers running. Don't forget to do some runs with stops in-between for some quick sets of push ups and crunches...possibly even pull ups if there are some bars available! Don't go searching the internet for some workout plan...getting out of the house and running some distance is a good start, the rest will come as you go...in my experience, anyway.

    ...What a long post! Sorry! But what else...be sure to stay hydrated, as in having a water bottle with you wherever you go. Do not drink soda, ever. It's not worth it. Eat healthy, and try to avoid fast food. The better you treat your body, the better it'll perform for you. Cliche, I know...

    Finally...take advantage of this summer weather! I live in Florida, so it's nice and humid as well as hot. Run during the hot daytime (Don't overexert yourself, though, can't stress this enough), so your body will be well conditioned and will have no problems with running at 0500-0600 in the morning...that's when our battalion PTs, anyway.

    So yeah, that's my two cents...I'll probably post more later, haha.
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I would suggest that you make sure your form is perfect to their regs. Many kids don't do it to ROTC stds and that hurts them. It hurts them because their body is being exerted more with the results being lower.

    Every yr there are kids who say OMG my score was so much lower than my PFA/CFA and that is all about correct form. They will be sticklers, so practice the form.

    I also agree a big issue for exercising will be weather, and having your body acclimate to it. DS always ran at the height of the heat of the day. He also ran in rain, not pouring rain, but if it was spitting he was running because he expected that to happen for ROTC.

    Butterfly kicks is also a favorite for ROTC, so it won't hurt to do them too just to get ready for PT, not necessarily the PFT.
     
  6. parkerafrotc2

    parkerafrotc2 Member

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    Exactly What I was looking for

    Thanks for the quick responses guys! Seems simple enough and my training begins now!
     
  7. h2ocop

    h2ocop Member

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    Question about the Army ROTC PT Test

    I understand it is 2 minutes of pushups, 2 minutes of situps and a 2 mile run. Min score of 180 is based on 60 pushups, 60 situps and 15:58 2 mile. What is required for max score? And my biggest question, are each of the events done sequential like the academy CFA (one right after another)? Or do you get to rest between events.
     
  8. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Let me google that for you...
     
  9. sg1fan93

    sg1fan93 Member

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    Does anyone have personal experience going from low altitude to high altitude for PT? I'm gonna be a mile up next year and I wanna try to minimize the loss of points as much as possible.
     
  10. Fengawr

    Fengawr Member

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    This last summer, I went to a running camp in the mountains. The elevation from where I live was close to being doubled when I went to the camp. On the first day, all we did was run for 3 minutes, rest. Then run for 4 minutes and then rest. And we did that until we could run for about 10 minutes straight w/o really breathing too hard. But by the end of the week, my body was almost used to running up there. We did 26 miles one day (Hiking and running) and some uphill 5k's. For myself, it is just a matter of getting used to the elevation difference. If I was there for a week longer, I would've felt the same as when I was at the lower elevation.
     
  11. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    The Min. score of 180 is based on points. You need 60 points in both sit ups and push ups, not 60 each. I believe the passing number for PU is 42 and for SU 56. to max the test you will need a 13:00 min 2 mile, 78 SU and I believe 72 PU.

    Yes the are all done in sequence. You do the PU and SU first and then the run. You have just a few min. between the events.

    Don't rely on the numbers you got on the PFT, this test will be harder, they only count the PU and SU that meet regulation. Many cadets that said they got 55 PU on the 1:00 PFT barely got 35 in 2 min of the APFT. Doing them to regulation is not easy, and they watch you real close.
     
  12. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Many of the AFA cadets face this, some will arrive a few days early to acclimate. Most ROTC units do not do PT minute one you arrive. I would suggest to follow fengawrs' lead and once there start running in increments so you are acclimated before ROTC meets.

    DS is AFROTC, and they don't have their 1st PT session until @ 1 week after move in. By following his lead you will be better off than those who are hanging in the lounge dorm for that 1st week. You might even decide this is the time to get acclimated to the O dark 30 schedule.

    One thing that is difficult for ROTC cadet/mids is finding that balance if ROTC is not a big program at school. You live a quasi life between student and cadet. You will need to find the equilibrium. It is doable without a doubt, but there is no set equation for success. It is all about the cadet/mid and finding their equilibrium.

    Good luck. Thank you for stepping up to the plate to defend and serve.
     
  13. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    I will add a suggestion I have given in the past and always is correct. Before starting a running program, make sure you get appropriate footware and retire it BEFORE you start feeling problems.

    I suggest spending a few more bucks and go to a store that specializes in running (not your big box discounter). They will make sure you get a shoe that fits YOUR feet (width/arch/etc). You might spend 10 or 20 dollars more, but the advice (you should talk to them about your running goals) will be worth it.
     
  14. InterestedRetiree

    InterestedRetiree LCDR USNR-R

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    I'm going to start by agreeing with Pima that finding the balance may be the most important thing to consider. For myself I found throughout my career that atheletic activity in general, rather than concentrating on a specific skill, was the most important thing. Prior to OCS I had about a six week period after I finished teaching to get physically ready. I played tennis.

    I don't specifically remember any of the regimented PT from OCS. What I remember was the time we spent in the gym. We did whatever training we felt we needed, <b>concentrating on working as a team</b>. Tests were done as a team, with those who could excel working together to drop back and make sure our stragglers made it through.

    As for the altitude. I went straight from OCS to Intel School in Denver arriving in January. We, of course, made a class trip to ski. A Basin, with a 13,050 ft summit, caused others shortness of breath, even nose bleeds. I had no such problem.

    Once during my AD time I made an extra effort to get in a few more pushups during my PFT. Our PFT officer, who was a SEAL, told me right after that the Navy's intent was to get everyone to find their own lifetime sport. It would be something that would become a part of your life that you wanted to do, and not something that was specifically targeted toward passing the test.

    During my time in the reserves, I swam for the semi-annual test. One time I had not run or swam for the entire six months since the previous test. When I popped my head out of the water and heard my time my mouth fell open, because it was the best time I had ever swam. I had been engaging in my sport, figure skating, for about 90 minutes four times a week.

    I was never an athlete in HS or college. I graduated from college close to 50 lbs heavier than I am now. Anybody can suceed at PT with the right mindset.
     
  15. bryan.silverman

    bryan.silverman New Member

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    Basketball throw

    How do you guys think is the best way to train for the west point CFA basketball throw? I can meet all the other averages and do the running, but I havn't tried the basketball throw. I've never had that great of an arm for baseball, and I'm not really sure how to go about improving my distance for this.
     
  16. sg1fan93

    sg1fan93 Member

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    Thanks for everyone's help. I'll be sure to take everyone's advice :thumb:
     
  17. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    the bball throw is a lot of technique, so just practice. I could tell you to do lots of upper body weight work (tricepts, biceps, lats), but just practicing the technique will help you more than anything else.
     
  18. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Many will tell you that throwing it more like a baseball = better results.

    BB and pull ups are usually the ones that give the most problems.

    Post on the USMA thread here and you will get a ton of responses.

    For the AFA 100 is the max. I would believe that this is also true for the USMA.

    Pullups max are 18 the last I knew.

    Finally, avg in this day and age is not what you want to place as your bar. You want to come near the max because every point on the WCS counts. You do not want to be sitting here 11 months from now with a TWE and wondering if I did one more push up or sit up, or ran 1 minute faster would that have resulted in winning the appointment?

    The PFA and CFA are different.

    If you go the ROTC route you will understand that the PFT is part of the equation as a cadet.

    Everyone has given great suggestions and you need to now weed through what is best for you. Some cadets have great upper body strength and form, but slow runners. That is what they need to work on. Some will be great runners, but have issues mastering the form for a push up.

    There is no one perfect answer that can be given because every cadet will have a weakness. You all know your own weaknesses that must be addressed, go from there. If you feel there is no weakness per se than continue the regiment you have followed historically...in other words keep working out during the summer. Don't rest on your laurels because you will pay for it come this fall. ROTC PT leaders will see it at your 1st PT.

    Good luck.
     
  19. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    Step and Throw

    Step and throw. But you have to work up to it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hQiZqdbuvJY&feature=related
     
  20. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    Dwyane Wade's great technique will not help since the basketball throw is from a kneeling position. The following is from Stew Smith

    www.military.com/military-fitness/fitness-test-prep/service-academy-cfa

    Basketball Throw

    Practice throwing the ball from your knees at a 45 degree angle using your entire torso and arm. By using a twisting motion of your torso you will be able to generate more throwing power than if you just threw with your arm. Exercises to assist with this test:

    - Lightweight Shoulder Workout
    - Pull-ups
    - Abdominal Exercises
    - Lower Back Exercises
    - Upper Back Exercises
     

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