Pulmonary Function Test Help (asthma)

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by 2015navy, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. 2015navy

    2015navy New Member

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    I was prescribed an inhaler in middle school for shortness of breath during sports and doctors thought I had sports induced asthma. I used the inhaler once and found it to be ineffective. I have since participated in varsity wrestling, lacrosse, and football with no breathing problems throughout all of high school and do not think I have asthma. Since asthma was on my record they required me to take a pulmonary function test. Surprisingly the
    conclusion reads: "This is a positive METHACHOLINE challege with a drop in FEV1 of 24% after 25mg of METHACHOLINE. The patient had received 2.5mg of ALBUTEROL post-METHACHOLINA chalenge resulting in an FEV1 up to 4.87 liters. The RESULTS reads" The patients baseline FEV1 was 4.60 liters, 110% of predicted with an FEV1 to FVC ratio of 71%. The FEV 25/75 at baseline is 75%. The patient then underwent a METHACHOLINE challenge and at 25mg dropped the FEV! 24%."

    I am assuming that this will likely disqualify me since DODMERB seems to be pretty black and white with asthma even though I missed the requirement by only 4%. Any thoughts on the possibility of being disqualified for this or receiving a waiver? What is some history of USNA with offering waivers for asthma?

    This is the last part of my application that is incomplete and holding up the review. I am hopeful that this will not prevent me from pursuing USNA, especially because I know that I am capable of taking on the physical challenges of the Academy.
     
  2. MullenLE

    MullenLE Member

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    Recommend you look at my posting moments ago regarding shellfish allergy. I discuss waivers there:thumb:
     
  3. 2015navy

    2015navy New Member

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    Thank you mr. Mullen, that information was helpful.
     
  4. MullenLE

    MullenLE Member

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    U R welcome:thumb:
     
  5. supreme1

    supreme1 Member

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    asthma

    If I remember right, (been a couple of years) you have to have been issued the inhaler etc after your 13th bday. If no symtoms after 13th bday I dont believe the DODMERB form makes you report it. Anyone clarification out there?
     
  6. 2015navy

    2015navy New Member

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    I never used the inhaler after age 13, but my mom kept renewing the prescription so that is why it is on my record.
     
  7. MullenLE

    MullenLE Member

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    The questions on the history form states "have you ever had or do you now have.." That makes it very clear.:thumb:
     
  8. ColtDad

    ColtDad Member

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    We have the same DQ. Same extinuating circumstances also. After 7th grade middle school football asthma was never an issue again. However, being an unwise parent we had no idea that renewing a prescription for an unused inhaler was such a bad thing.

    What I don't understand is, if a candidate has the word "asthma" anywhere in their medical history post 13 yrs old, then why the "remedial" dog and pony show? Send them the inevitable DQ and inform them of the next options to persue if they are still interested.

    Why delay the inevitable rather than immediately instructing the applicant on the most common tests and methods and let them get started if they wish to pursue the matter? For many applicants time is of the essence in obtaining a waiver.

    If 99% of the applicants who list asthma after age 13 are DQ'd, I would say it is safe to assume there will be a more in-depth investigation if this candidate is to have any hope whatsoever. Why dance around the issue? Let them get started if they wish. Let them know what information or test scores they are going to need to provide in order to have any chance of continuing in the process.

    My sons DODMERB medical history was completed nearly two months ago. We knew at that time the asthma issue would come up. Yet here we sit doing nothing. I realize the academy is first trying to determine if he is a good enough candidate before pursuing the waiver, but why not give us the option of telling us what further process will be necessary since we will have to pay for it anyway?
     
  9. shellz

    shellz Parent

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    Coltdad, et al...
    We did the remedial dance for the unused inhaler past age 13. Twice, actually...the MCCT (Methalcholine Challenge Test) came back out of line with what the doctor who read the test was anticipating, so off we trundled again....repeat MCCT and a better result was obtained. Both times, the cost of the exam was covered by DoDMERB. So, the additional testing for the remedial is not something you can or should pay for on your own, in our experience. I know it is frustrating, but the cost of this particular test is prohibitively expensive. And I also know that we would have gladly paid for it to hurry it along, so I empathize...
    Hang in there...if indeed you have to take the MCCT, and it is negative, a waiver might just be the reward for your patience. :wink:
     
  10. ColtDad

    ColtDad Member

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    Thank you Sheelz. Very informative.

    For us, one waiver would be a starting point. We will need....get this...four! I have said in another post we are attempting to set an Academy record.
     
  11. shellz

    shellz Parent

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    Oh boy...good luck ColtDad. Like I said...I feel for ya :rolleyes: This process was challenging for me, a "Do it now" kind of gal. The waiting was horrible. I tell my kids that these sorts of things build character. I had a hard time accepting my own words of wisdom on more than one occasion during the long haul to the eventual appt. for DS.

    And to think, we will likely do this one more time for DS2.....more character building in my future? I think yes.
     
  12. 2015navy

    2015navy New Member

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    Shellz,

    Do you think it is worthwhile for me to schedule another appointment and retake the methacoline challenge test? The secretary at dodmerb said that could be an option, although I know she is not a doctor. I called the doctor's office where the test was taken and they said there can't be false-positives. However, you said your results were improved on the second MCCT. Time certainly is an issue on this and I'm not sure how black and white they are with waivers for asthma.
     
  13. shellz

    shellz Parent

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    Larry would be your best advocate on this one Navy2015. Do what he recommends...he is THE MAN!

    My son's results weren't really typical. The first time around (as well as the second) the results were negative, but the doc reading the test wanted to be doubly sure of his interpretation. Son's first results after the inhalant were "too good"...ie, they were out of the range of expected outcomes, so the doc wanted a re-do, suspecting something wasn't done properly during testing. Turns out son wasn't inhaling/exhaling as much as he could for the control portion of the test, so when he knocked it out of the park AFTER the inhalant, it just didn't make sense. He actually improved after inhaling the irritant. So, son re-took the test, and the administrator made sure he understood exactly what to do. His test results were again negative for asthma, and the data fell within the expected range. It's such a wonky test, in my opinion, if it can be thrown off by a person not breathing "correctly". But, it is the "gold standard", or so we've been told.

    Good luck with this, and your future plans. There is a path out there for everyone...sometimes you just have to look a little harder to find the right one. :thumb:
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2011
  14. MullenLE

    MullenLE Member

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