Questions about depression and the academy

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by zaroxity, Nov 9, 2015.

  1. zaroxity

    zaroxity New Member

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    I have been struggling with depression for a while now but have not sought help because depression can be a disqualifying condition so I have just been soldiering on because its my dream to go to the Naval Academy or NROTC and if I can't get into those to just be able to enlist. However it has been getting a lot worse lately and it is affecting my grades. So I would like to know if theres someway that I can get the help I need but still be able to be in the navy either enlisted or officer. Thank you for your time.
     
  2. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Your health and life are far more important that getting into any school. If you need help, please get it.


    At an academy doctors, chaplains and counsellors are there to help (and its can be a stressful environment.)
     
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  3. proudofmyboy

    proudofmyboy Member

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    You need to take care of yourself first. Please seek help so you can achieve your goals.
     
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  4. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    Get the help you need. There is no shame in it. Get the help you need and let the cards fall where they might when applying. There are lots of none medicated solutions. Counseling, exercise, etc. First seek help from a professional who can diagnose and provide recommendations for treatment.
     
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  5. Usnavy2019

    Usnavy2019 Member

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    There are many people in your shoes! Heed to everybody's advice. I think it is only a DQ if you self-injured/took medication for it. It is completely normal for young adults to go through depression and seek help. You have already made the first step:, identifying the problem! I suffer from a lot of self-worth issues and it really drags me down sometimes, but hey, I am a Midshipman. I seek help when I am really down. You can definitely accomplish your dreams! I was always the kid who said I'm not worth people's time/I'm not good enough, but I have accomplished a ton. I am not trying to toot my horn, but what I am trying to get across is that you can do anything if you rise above your depression!
     
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  6. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I fully agree with all, especially Navy Hoops. I would add a couple things. When you speak to a doctor mention your dream as it might influence their proposed treatment. Some docs will just describe antidepressants when it isn't always necessary. Secondly depression is often caused by stress. It might very well be that your grades are influencing your depression vs the other way around, or its a cycle of influence, for whatever its worth.
     
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  7. time2

    time2 Member

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    Since it sounds like you are still in h.s., I think it is best you don't try to self-diagnose any medical condition you think you might have. Better to talk with your parents or have you family doctor provide his/her professional opinion. Even real doctors won't diagnose someone without first meeting them in person and reviewing all relevant background information.
     
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  8. mista

    mista Member

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    Please, please, please seek some help. Your health is so much more important at this point. It may not be what you think, but if it is, get the help and treatment you need and deserve and then determine whether your dream is still possible or if you even want it still, and move on from there. There is no shame in seeking help. In fact, I would argue that it is one of the most couragous things you could do.
     
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  9. scutrules

    scutrules Member

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    Depression is not a disqualifying factor, waivers are definitely possible to get. I agree with the above comment about not self-diagnosing, that can be one of the most dangerous things you can do regarding mental health. Go seek help now, do not wait on something like this. If you seek help now, you can be better prepared for ROTC/Academy/Enlisted life. And worry about yourself now and the waiver later. I did not take care of myself and the path I went down was really difficult to deal with and left me with very few options.
     
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  10. FutureCadet12

    FutureCadet12 Member

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    Bumping this... stuck in a similar predicament right now and don't know what to do.
     
  11. Usnavy2019

    Usnavy2019 Member

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    I would go to counseling first with a licensed psychologist/therapist. As NavyHoops said, there are tons of non-medicinal methods to combat depression. Let a mental health professional diagnose you. It only hurts you to self-diagnose. If you were never diagnosed with it, you don't have it. If you follow that rule, it makes DoDMERB a bit less stressful. Do a Google search for local therapists. Try and find a family therapist/one that specializes in adolescent counseling. Lastly, don't self-injure or self-medicate (drugs, alcohol, etc). Nothing but bad things comes from them and the relief is only temporary.
     
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  12. landlock

    landlock Member

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    If you have a medical home, as in a pediatrician or family practice MD that you have been seeing for regular care ask them for referrals. Let them know your career goals. We (I am one) always have a group of psychologists we trust in the community to refer to and if we know your goals would try to maximize non pharaceutical help as much as possible. But as everyone previously has said get help! Good luck.
     
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  13. TXHopeful

    TXHopeful Member

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    My oldest DS recently tried to enlist in the Navy, and scored very high on the tests. Despite a huge medical file from a serious accident last year, the doctors at MEPS passed him medically, all except for one thing... he went one time to a counselor. He even had a letter from the counselor stating that he sees no issues with military service and found no diagnosis or serious problems, but even so they would not qualify him. He had to submit the actual notes from the counseling session to MEPS. That was done five weeks ago, and we are still waiting to see if he will be qualified; it looks like he will not. However, I do agree that you should get help and that your physical and emotional health must come first, regardless of what that means for future career plans. I will say that having seen the perspective from both DODMERB and MEPS, DODMERB is easier to pass in my opinion.
     
  14. time2

    time2 Member

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    Anyone who thinks they have a medical issue should see a doctor and not search out random medical opinions from people who don't know you on-line. Even a real doctor won't diagnose someone without first seeing them and reviewing their medical history
     
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