SAT Score?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by MMMom, May 24, 2012.

  1. MMMom

    MMMom Member

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    DS just got scores back... 760 math, 640 on both reading and writing. I know all the other factors matter (he is top 3% of his class of 1000 at competitive public high school, 4 year varsity athlete, team captain, lettered sports and academics, all AP's, has a job, holds offices in NHS and large service club, extensive volunteer hours, going to Boy's State and NASS... you know, all the same stuff EVERY OTHER potential USNA kid has!), but my question is does anyone think he needs to take the SAT again? This is the second time and he improved by 110 points overall. He took the ACT once, and won't be able to retake until the fall, but got a 30 overall, which is about the equivalent of his SAT score. Any thoughts?
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Those are certainly competitive scores, but since he has nothing to lose I'd recommend taking it again to try to raise the critical reading score.
     
  3. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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    I will PM u
     
  4. MIHOSER

    MIHOSER Member

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    The key score is the math score. I don't believe writing is even considered.

    My S was admitted with 800 M, 600 V. When I talked to him about re-taking, he told me those are "engineer's" scores and are just fine.

    Actually, he officially sent his ACT scores, which were similar, to USNA but somehow they knew his SAT scores.
     
  5. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

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    Yes. Retake it. He has plenty of time to study up until the fall, and will probably improve over a period of five or so months. A 640 has plenty of room for improvement.

    There will be plenty of candidates with high 700s on all sections. While those scores are considered to be competitive as far as national averages are concerned, they may not be competitive in your district or state when he's competing for a congressional nomination. Your congressmen may look at all three scores.

    Unless there's a financial restriction, there's no harm in trying again anyway, and plenty of potential for benefit.
     

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