Security Clearance Question

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by candidate2014, Apr 26, 2014.

  1. candidate2014

    candidate2014 Member

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    I was looking at SF86 and an issue came up--I was fired from a job last month. The given reason was that there were no hours for me. Will this hinder or halt my security clearance in any way?
     
  2. colinmcd

    colinmcd Member

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  3. candidate2014

    candidate2014 Member

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    Thanks for the response. Do you know if I have to list private families I babysat and tutored for as employers as well? I listed it on my initial application, but since I no longer work for those families, I would hate for them to have to go through the trouble of providing references etc.
     
  4. BlackKnight2016

    BlackKnight2016 Member

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    In the business world, we don't usually think of someone being let go for a reduction in hours as being fired. Usually you are fired for cause. This implies some action on your part that led to the termination of employment. Replace the wording "fired" with "let go for reduction in hours" and you should be fine.
     
  5. RLTW

    RLTW Member

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    RIF

    Agreed with BlackKnight. A common phrase for this type of action is to be “laid off” or to be affected by a Reduction In Force, or RIF, and you may hear people say “I was laid off” or “I was RIF’d” or similar, meaning laid off the work force due to the company’s decrease in demand for labor yet unrelated to any personal performance issues.
     
  6. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    "Laid off" isn't really used in white collar world these days. We've gone to a kinder, gentler language.
     

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