The "Mom Thing"

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by bruno, Aug 9, 2010.

  1. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    http://www.americanthinker.com/2010/07/the_mom_thing.html

    This is a pretty thought provoking piece. I have had a few folks say similar things to me over the years (both Moms and Dads) and have to confess that I have thought much the same as this person but haven't actually said it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2010
  2. Momof2cadets

    Momof2cadets Founding Member

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    Great article!!! Thanks for sharing -- I too have felt the "mom thing" -- as I hugged my friend beside her son's -- my son's classmate's-- casket this spring; as I jump when someone knocks on my front door (my husband and son are both in Afghnistan). People ask me over and over how I do it, and my answer is always that it really isn't that hard. I just understand what is at stake... and that it is the choice they made. What I don't understand is when parents do not support a child who has made this choice, and rail against it.
     
  3. Maximus

    Maximus Member

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    You know Bruno, and I reluctantly say this here as I know I'll take heat saying it but, you can replace "mom thing" with "liberal progressive thing" and that explains a lot.
     
  4. MorganC

    MorganC Prospective

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    My mom has a "mom thing" too. It's to support me do whatever I want to do in life (I want to be a Marine). And to do everything she can to help me achieve my goals. I love my mommy. So supportive.
     
  5. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    I have taken that walk with my own "little boy" and two "little girls". The oldest is 1/C at USNA and the second is completing his application to USMA, USAFA and USNA. They both first did the walk when the oldest was seven and the youngest was three (stroller helped a lot). The only time the little guy stopped running was during the changing of the guard. The third can't wait till she is old enough to apply and we did the walk with her last April. I have the "Dad Thing" and mom certainly has the "Mom Thing" as both my parents probably had. Where does the "progressive thing" enter the picture? The explanation is owed to those who serve.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2010
  6. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    Quite an article! I think it may be a "family thing," but mom's tend to be able to voice it better than most.

    There are no politics involved in wanting a long and enjoyable life for your children.
    Political threads are that way. -->
     
  7. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    :smile:
     
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    As a wife and now a Mom of a cadet, people have asked me many times aren't you afraid they will die? I always respond the exact same way.

    I could lock them up in a closet, but if that is the day God is going to take them, than God is going to take them no matter what I do. I'd rather know that when they leave this world they never had regrets. It is not my place to interfere in their dreams, it is only my place to support them.

    It is a Mom thing and a Dad thing, to worry, but more importantly it is their thing to make sure every dream comes true, and if we believe they are adults with a level head, than we should always accept that they thought out this idea from every angle.
     
  9. rkrosnar

    rkrosnar Member

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    The Mom Thing

    Yes, this is a thought provoking article for sure. Just think though we never allowed are children to be in the military. Where would we or our great country be. I have a son. My son had great grades in high school and was highly sought after by an SA. He attended summer seminar, and decided after guidance from his Mommy, that it wasn't for him. Oh , by the way she served 4 years has medical specialists in the Army. He attends PSU and will junior this fall. He hates it there and doesn't want to be there. Now he is stuck, now that is the Mom Thing. She is in debt for 66,000 dollars.


    RGK
     
  10. buff81

    buff81 Moderator

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    But he is not stuck.
    If he truly wants to graduate from a SA, he still can as long as he meets the age requirement of the SA (ex. For USMA- has not turned 23 by July 1 of the admission year).
    It would take a lot of sacrifice - starting college all over, but others have done it. In fact, there are some advantages in starting at an older age with some college under your belt.
    Look into it.
    It is NOT too late!
     
  11. WAMom68

    WAMom68 Founding Member

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    Thanks for posting Bruno. I’m going to keep this one for future use. Maybe my father-in-law could learn something from it. He thinks it is great to serve in the military but only if it isn’t his children or grandchildren.

    Me too.

    Please don’t paint all liberals with the same brush…I consider myself liberal but I am very proud and fully support both my sons serving in the military.
     
  12. MakeItHappen

    MakeItHappen Member

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    I run into this sentiment far to often. IMHO, everyone should be obligated to serve 2-3 years right out of high school. I think we'd get less knee-jerk decision-makers.




    And Max is the exception that proves my above theory. :biggrin:
     
  13. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I agree. Many European countries do this, and the "fear" issue is not there for them. I don't see why we don't mandate 2yr military commitments.

    Additionally, there is another perk if everyone had to spend 2 yrs in the military. Their view about military spending might change, and that includes our elected officials that hold the purse strings for DOD. It is easy to say the budget is too large, but if they actually had to live it I bet they would re-think a lot of things. For example, would they understand that currently we still cannibalize planes for parts? Or how about if they had to live in a home on base which required signing a release for lead paint? Or the fact that many soldiers are paying for their groceries at the commissary with WIC and EBT? Maybe if they had to walk the walk, they would see any or all of these questions from their own perspective and not from RAND reports.
     
  14. rkrosnar

    rkrosnar Member

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    The Mom Thing

    BUFF81

    Very true statement, but he will do what she says. Anything to want she calls to protect him.

    RGK
     
  15. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Sorry Didn't see the BUFF81 Post before I sent this.


    Didn't see a BIG UGLY FAT FELLOW here but did see them do some great strikes. Actualy had TSQ-81 BROMO give us a heads up when a strike would be in visual range. They can still deliver the mail after all these years. "ARC-LIGHT" strikes from +30,000 were the most feared. You never hear it coming and then!

    We are getting way off topic.

    Read "Starship Trooper" by Heinlen. Not the movie read the book. It is more political than an adventure but it satisfies both and has a great premise.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2010
  16. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    As a wife that is the scary part, because we actually believed when you left we hid it from you!

    I can't tell you how many times I hugged and kissed Bullet before he left and never shed a tear, but the minute he was out of my sight I fell to the ground crying. Of course it lasted only a few minutes, because as any military spouse knows, you guys make sure before you leave the car gets a tune up, the house is inspected, and within 24 hours the car gets a flat, a pet dies and the dishwasher breaks:bang::bang::bang:
     
  17. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    Their views would have to change. A program such as this would be totally cost prohibitive. A summer camp for adults that lasts two years. I cannot imagine any enlisted specialty for which one can obtain any level of competence in much less than two year, many even more. So about the time we get them trained enough to earn their salray, we release them? I guess it would be great for the civilian job market. Social welfare at its best.
     
  18. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Sort of like Universal Conscription. I don't think the last one was Summer Camp at Lake Wobegon. When did cost prohibitive ever bother the government?:shake: We had some "Pavement Maintenance Specialists"
     
  19. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    The military DOES have a budget to which they are accountable. And they deemed 'universal conscription' not cost effective more than 50 years ago.
     
  20. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    I don't believe that we need mandatory military service. Our military, through volunteers, are in my opinion the best in the world. However, if we were to implement a mandatory 2 year military service for individuals; then we basically make them infantry and security police type jobs. These jobs only require a few weeks of training. Even basic admin jobs only require about 6 weeks of "technical School". There are plenty of jobs in the military that can be done without a lot of expensive training.

    As for the "Mom" thing, that is definitely a touchy subject. Usually those parents who don't want their kids to join the military, have instilled this attitude in them for many years. Most of these kids don't join the military. Of those that do, it's either to get the hell away from mom/dad, or because they have nothing else as an option. I speak here mainly of the enlisted force. The Academies/ROTC is usually because the individual truly wants it. Sometimes the cadet is there because their parents want it, but that isn't part of the "Mom Thing" we are talking about. So, with an 18 year old applying and getting accepted to the academy/ROTC scholarship, with a Mom that isn't thrilled about it, what do you do? Well, that is totally up to the cadet. What's important to note is that once the individual becomes a cadet, mom and dad have absolutely NO MORE SAY SO. So now it's just a matter of what type of relationship you want with your parents.

    When I joined the military, I was 17 years old. Like many cadets today. I had grades and desire to go to college, but my parents made it quite clear that they couldn't help me in any way, shape, or form with college. And scholarships, loans, etc... were not quite as available in the 70's as they are now. But I always wanted to be in the military. And to be totally honest, the military academies was never told to me as an option back in 1977-1978. Matter of fact, I never knew of anyone who had ever gone to a military academy. And I only lived 96 miles from West Point, 195 miles from Annapolis. Point was, I told my mom that she WOULD SIGN the papers. If she didn't, I would wait the 4 months after graduating high school and when I turned 18 I would do it on my own. The difference being, if she SIGNED the papers, I would still be her son. If I had to wait and do it myself, then our relationship would be pretty much over. (Yes, I was a prick). Point is, I understood her concerns and unwillingness. He brother died in Vietnam, her uncle died in Korea, another cousin died around 1962 (Not sure what military involvement that was). Point is, I understood her concerns. She made a deal with me. She'd sign, but not for the army or marines. Only Navy or air force. Well, considering I wanted air force 100%, that was fine. And of course she was less stressed. (Until of course she heard about involvements in Grenada, Libya, panama, etc..) But after a couple of years in, she pretty much accepted that I was now an adult and that was that.

    I think that is the hardest part for the "Mom Thing". Until they're 18, they are 100% full time their parent's kids. The parent EXPECTS that from 18-22, that the child will be 50% their kid and 50% independent college student; or learning to live on their own with their own job, etc... But military service is different. All in one day, they go from 100% mom and dad's kid to 100% responsible for their own actions, and mom and dad have absolutely NO SAY SO WHATSOEVER!!!! The academy is a little easier, because the cadet comes home at christmas, spring break, summer vacation, etc... It's Sort of like college. But I can't tell you how many cadet parents think they have every right to march their butt down to the academy and express their concerns. Or call the academy up on the phone and demand their rights. I have to tell these people: "You have NO RIGHTS!!!!". ANYTHING you get from the military concerning your child, is privileged information that YOUR CHILD HAS ALLOWED YOU TO HAVE. Kind of sucks when a parent has to ASK THEIR CHILD FOR PERMISSION. Anyway; I definitely understand the mom/dad thing. I will always be concerned for my son and daughter. But I remember when it was me, so I know enough to back off and let my son and daughter do whatever it is they're going to do.
     

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