The typical Midshipman from High School

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by K_Delrosario, Jun 20, 2009.

  1. K_Delrosario

    K_Delrosario Prospective

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    Hello all, I would like to ask a question inspired by the pessimism I experienced from my parents as they saw my last grade report.

    Is a typical person offered appointment to USNA the classic 5.0 GPA weighted/4.0 unweighted person, or top 1% class ranking, or 1590 SAT M & CR, or AP and IB course load?

    Seriously, just to give the particulars on my situation, I come from a Navy family and my parents want me to really get into USNA, but they are really putting me down and giving me a hard time for having a 4.2 GPA weighted/3.8 unweighted and a couple of B's in my AP classes.
     
  2. America's Finest

    America's Finest USMA Cadet

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    Are any of them USNA graduates?

    Seriously, nobody is perfect, just keep trying. Most people don't have nearly what your parents are expecting. It's not all academics, it's a whole person score.
     
  3. xrunmariarunx

    xrunmariarunx Member

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    I agree with America's Finest. 1) It depends on what the Admissions Board is looking for really that particular year. 2) Every single application is unique; they take it case by case.

    Just try your best. They can't ask for anything more than that.

    Good luck with your application. :thumb:
     
  4. K_Delrosario

    K_Delrosario Prospective

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    No my parents were not, they were enlisted from overseas. But they are seriously like being really pessimistic saying that I couldnt get in with the grades I already have, they think that the Service Academies have all Ivy league caliber Mids/cadets.
     
  5. America's Finest

    America's Finest USMA Cadet

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    You can also view the statistics for all the classes and see just how well they did. Just take a look at one of the recent classes' statistics to give you an idea. The most significant thing is being physically fit and having leadership.
     
  6. K_Delrosario

    K_Delrosario Prospective

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    I understand, thank you though for filling me in on this part of the application.

    To be perfectly honest though, the only thing I have that other applicants may not is that I am a polygot. Because I know there's gonna be kids with better GPAs, Grades and SAT scores, or athletic performances than me.
     
  7. marvin7794

    marvin7794 Member

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    Do you want to go to USNA or do your parents want you to? It sucks a lot so I wouldn't do it for mommy or daddy. Be a man or woman and do what is best for you.
     
  8. K_Delrosario

    K_Delrosario Prospective

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    Both. I really want it for myself, however my parents keep purging me at every little thing and are very pessimisstic
     
  9. ENSmom

    ENSmom Member

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    There are so many variables that one cannot generalize. A lot depends on luck; by that I mean the quality of the candidates with whom you are competing for the nomination and appointment from the congressional slate.

    Some years the pool is more talented than others. Some years your stats may be the most outstanding; other years the same stats may be hum-drum compared with your competition.

    If you really want this, it does not just happen. Be the best person you can be academically, physically and leadership-wise. Make a committment to yourself. That is all you can do.

    As a parent, I suspect that your parents know your capabilities and that in their eyes you are not being the best you can be. That is not a slam, but I teach in a great high school and I see it all of the time. I also suspect that if your parents saw you putting in your best effort, no matter what the outcome, they would be happy.

    Best of Luck,
    ENSmom
     
  10. SteveHolt243

    SteveHolt243 Member

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    You'd be surprised how many mids are not "Ivy League caliber." You get a wide variety of midshipmen, because of geographic diversity, athletic recruitment, priors, NAPSters, foundation students, etc (not a knock on any of those, just an acknowledgment that their academic standards for acceptance aren't quite the same). Like others said, each student's viewed differently, and a couple random Bs are not going to kill you, especially with other things on your record.
     
  11. titan2010

    titan2010 Member

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    While leadership and physical fitness are important, they are not MOST important as said before.

    It's broken down 60% Academic, 30% leadership potential, 10% physical (CFA) at USMA. I'm guessing it's similar at USNA, and USAFA.

    As for GPA, don't worry about it. It, by itself, is not nearly as important as class rank or SAT/ACT. Class rank shows your competitive nature in your environment against your peers. SAT/ACT shows how you stack up on an even playing field. If your school does not rank, then SAT/ACT scores become more important. After that, GPA and your strength of class schedule comes into play along with strength of school itself.

    To answer your question about caliber, it's about whole candidate score. The kids that are 5.0's can get in with lesser extracurriculars. Some candidates that are weaker academically are Eagle Scouts and football captains. Again, academics are most important. In my personal and very modest opinion, a few B's in AP classes are nothing to worry about.
    Just compete, compete, compete.
     
  12. rotorhd

    rotorhd Member

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    Delrosario - Some thoughts:

    Is either of your parents collecting retirement pay from the navy? If so you may qualify for a Presidential nomination - this increases your chances of gaining an appointment if qualified.

    Realize that geographic area is a factor. In areas where there are a high density of candidates (DC Area, California, Florida) the competition is keener.

    Check out the Class of 2012 profile on the admissions website. This is a good indication of the kinds of activities admissions looks for

    Also - would you be willing to accept a Naval Academy foundation scholarship or NAPS for one year before entering USNA?

    If you are a minority - this also gives you a leg up.

    Judging by the info you provided, you have every reason to continue seeking an appointment. My guess is that your parents, being former enlisted, see the Naval Academy as quite a lofty goal. Trust me, it is attainable - only a question of how bad you want it.

    Best of Luck!
     
  13. America's Finest

    America's Finest USMA Cadet

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    Just like to add that they don't need to be getting retirement pay. Mine are active duty right now and I received the presidential nomination as one of mine.
     
  14. MJOmom

    MJOmom Member

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    Your grades sound beyond fine. The whole package counts ... leadership, varsity sports, multi-sport athlete, SATs ... and grades ... plus the essays, plus the interviews (this part is huge) ... getting nominated is the top thing. In our case, my son had a 3.75 unweighted 4.2 weighted ... but he also took hard classes, chemistry, ap chem, physics, ap physics, ap calc etc ... all counts. On paper his SATs may not have gotten him in (690 math, 560 english) ... BUT something stood out to the board ... and he is part of the class of 2013 ... he also recieved a full Navy ROTC scholarship ... which would have been a fantastic choice ... full tuititon, books & fees ... if USNA hadn't come through ... so DON"T go nuts ... have a great time in high school, challenge yourself and see if it is what YOU want ... that will show through in interviews and essays ... it's a big deal, and regular college with or without the NROTC scholarship is a really good way to go for many people.
     
  15. MJOmom

    MJOmom Member

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    My son had several Bs over the years ... including in AP ... he is in the top 10 percent of his class ... you do NOT have to be 5.0 or top 1 percent ... and if you look at some other posts and news stories on the academy that is backed up ... be a team player, show persistance and leadership ... and have fun ... when my son went to interview at the congressional offices, tons of rotc kids showed up in their uniforms. My son wore a shirt, tie and his letterman's jacket with all his patches (football, skiing, track, academic letter) ... and who got the nom? my kid ... we are grateful, pleased and astonished ... he is a well rounded kid, who thinks, speaks well, and must show promise or he wouln't have made it ... who can say why? have a back up plan at other schools ...
     
  16. Maximus

    Maximus Member

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    You might want to ask yourself the big question, is it you or your parents that want the USNA?
    IMO, your academic stats look good and should qualify academically.
     
  17. TJ2013

    TJ2013 New Member

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    Hi, when I received my appointment I had a 2050 composite SAT score, 3.9 weighted, and I was in the top 15% of my class.

    Your academics are fine-what you need is a good balance.

    I'd recommend volunteering. It's a great way to keep yourself busy over the summer and with the rest of the summer you could easily get at least 50+ volunteer hours.

    Join sports teams as well, or physically challenging extra-curriculars (Such as a karate class).

    Finally-any leadership position will help, I was lucky to be the CO of my MCJROTC unit and that alone provided me with a quality background.


    There is a lot more than just grades that go into the selection process-I'd recommend focusing on some other aspects if you haven't already
     
  18. ENSmom

    ENSmom Member

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    I noticed that you are from Maryland, a VERY competitive state. Your parents most likely are aware of the high level of competition for both a nomination and appointment.

    As many have stated before, not one of us on this forum has direct knowledge of whether your "whole person" score will be competitive enough to reach your goal given the large number of well qualified candidates in your area with the same aspirations.

    Be the best you can be. Work hard to be well rounded, pursuing things you enjoy rather than those that merely "look good" on your resume. No matter the outcome, you can then reflect that you did your best.

    I wish you well.
    ENSmom
     

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