Unusual case

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by Maxim, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. Maxim

    Maxim New Member

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    Greetings to everyone!
    My name is Max and I find myself in a challenging situation trying to get into West Point.
    I would appreciate your comments and feedback, any information and advice would be helpful.
    I am 20 years old and I am a recent immigrant from Europe. Unfortunately, the immigration process took much longer time than we expected killing my chances of entering USMA. My other problem is that my birthday is in the middle of June, essentially costing me a year. We're applying for the adjustment of status this month which means I'll be a permanent resident, at best, by next summer. Then, I plan to join the Army and get citizenship by the end of the BCT. That will be around mid-fall. At that time I'll be 21 and, by the regular rules it will be my last chance to apply. Then, the actual challenge begins:

    1) My recruiter said that for making any career changes like applying for the USMA or changing MOS I have to fulfill 2 years of my contract.
    Question: Is it really so? Are there any exceptions to this rule?

    2) West Point is highly competitive. I'll need recommendations from my commanders. It is really difficult, if possible, to get a recommendation being a couple of months in a unit. Time plays against me again.
    Question: How can I show myself and prove personal eligibility in that short time? What is counted as distinguishing in the Army?

    3) Time plays against me. Residence permit issuance may be delayed, or I'll have to serve as enlisted for 2 years, or my commander won’t give endorsement.
    Question: Can I apply and get an age waiver in the USMA? By that time I'll probably have meritorious service records, positive feedback and recommendations.

    A little about myself - I live in California, in the SF bay area. My immigration is family-based and I adapt very quickly here, especially since my mentality is close to American. I am western European and I have lived for 5 years in Turkey, so I can compare various experiences of immigration and cultural differences. I can speak, read and write in 5 languages (4 fluently) and I keep improving on this number. I am mature beyond my years having lived in different countries and experienced life’s challenges. I traveled a lot throughout my life. I'm physically fit, extremely active, well educated, and self-disciplined. I know the price of self-motivation. I am a person of high standards. My creed is to always give 100 percent and to always finish what I start.
     
  2. GoArmyBeatNavy

    GoArmyBeatNavy Member

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    You can't be 23 or older on 1 July of the year you enter Cadet Basic Training.

    There is no time limit to serve as an enlisted Soldier before applying. You must be endorsed by your company commander or higher level commander. Most Soldiers do not know there commanders that well. Commanders will take input from their Platoon Leaders and Platoon Sergeants. Be on time, work hard, be a team player, stay out of trouble, do what you are told and you would be set up for a good recommendation. Make sure you inform your chain of command about your desire to apply to West Point by OCT of the year you want to apply.

    Being an enlisted Soldier is a full time job. Many great Soldiers can't complete the application process because of work and deployment requirements. Most who are competitive will have to spend a year at USMAPS. For USMAPS, you can't be 22 or older on 1 July of the year you enter USMAPS.

    You would most likely not be legible for an age waiver as it would require you to serve in Afghanistan (OEF). The time frame for service in OEF is closing fast.

    Best bet is to get very high ACT and SAT test scores.
     
  3. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    1) I believe your recruiter is wrong. Politely ask for some proof in writing

    2) you are not really getting your commander's recommendation, rather his or her endorsement. I have seen soldiers getting commanders' endorsement during basic or advance individual training.
     
  4. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    I don't understand something. Why is it so vital that you enlist? It makes everything a lot more "chancey" and you are really working against yourself. There have been numerous threads here on the inadvisability of enlisting, thinking that somehow it is an easier path when, in reality, it is the hardest.
     
  5. Maxim

    Maxim New Member

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    Beside some other reasons, like getting recommendation or non-American High School education, there is essential requirement - citizenship.
    My recruiter said that by the end of BCT naturalization process can be accomplished if I apply as early as leaving to boot camp.
     
  6. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/us...nnel=ce613e4d77d73210VgnVCM100000082ca60aRCRD


    Naturalization through Qualifying Service during Periods of Hostilities

    Generally, members of the U.S. armed forces who serve honorably for any period of time (even 1 day) during specifically designated periods of hostilities (see below) are eligible for naturalization under section 329 of the INA through such military service.

    In general, an applicant for naturalization under INA 329 must:

    Have served honorably in active-duty status, or as a member of the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, for any amount of time during a designated period of hostilities and, if separated from the U.S. armed forces, have been separated honorably


    Have been lawfully admitted as a permanent resident at any time after enlistment or induction, OR have been physically present in the United States or certain territories at the time of enlistment or induction (regardless of whether the applicant was admitted as a permanent resident)


    Be able to read, write, and speak basic English


    Have a knowledge of U.S. history and government (civics)


    Have been a person of good moral character during all relevant periods under the law


    Have an attachment to the principles of the U.S. Constitution and be well disposed to the good order and happiness of the U.S. during all relevant periods under the law


    There is no minimum age requirement for an applicant under this section. The designated periods of hostilities are:

    April 6, 1917 to November 11, 1918


    September 1, 1939 to December 31, 1946


    June 25, 1950 to July 1, 1955


    February 28, 1961 to October 15, 1978


    August 2, 1990 to April 11, 1991


    September 11, 2001 until the present


    The current designated period of hostilities starting on September 11, 2001, will terminate when the President issues an Executive Order terminating the period.

    Note: current members of the U.S. armed forces who qualify for naturalization under sections 328 or 329 of the INA can proceed with their naturalization application either in the United States or overseas.
     

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