updating my SS file?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Born-To-Fly_024, Apr 17, 2010.

  1. Born-To-Fly_024

    Born-To-Fly_024 Member

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    I recently got rejected from NASS due to low standardized test scores (my sophomore year PSAT). However, recently I took the SAT and received better scores. Is there any way I can update my SS file, because I dont want the Academy to deny me as a candidate because of low test scores.

    Or should I just send in a preliminary application?
     
  2. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    If you submitted an application for NASS, you also applied to become a candidate to USNA; therefore you don't have to submit a preliminary application. Yes you should have your later SAT/ACT scores sent to USNA; you will be given the benefit of your best scores from either exam. Generally, you need to be scoring in the mid 600s (SAT) or mid 20s to be designated as an Official Candidate and get a number and packet.
     
  3. sturner11

    sturner11 Member

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    You should update your scores before the initial evaluation is done (when they decide whether or not you are competitive for admission), but no, you will not be reevaluated for NASS.
     
  4. aglages

    aglages Parent

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    When is the initial evaluation complete?

    I think that if you didn't have high enough scores to be "designated as an Official Candidate and get a number and packet", that you should just keep sending in your updates in the hopes of eventually hitting the "magic" number necessary, or until the admissions people realize you are seriously interested.
     
  5. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    The SERIOUS prospect indeed will keep taking the SAT/ACT exams and submitting their scores until they hit the "magic number" to trigger the candidate number and packet. Persistence has a habit of paying-off in the long run.
     
  6. jennyp

    jennyp Parent

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    SAT/ACT's seem to be a problem for several candidates who are just now beginning the process. My son, currently a plebe, took each test 3 times to keep improving his scores.

    I see posts on here where people report scores that are likely not to get them even a candidate number; others reporting scores that are barely within the middle range of candidates who successfully gained appointments. (Check out class profiles available on USNA official web site.) And folks reassuring them that the concept of a whole person score will somehow smooth over their less than stellar test scores.

    Folks, read through some of the threads on this forum. It is extremely competitive to get into any SA. Extremely competitive. You will read of candidates this year with 33 ACT, several varsity sports, eagle scouts and other leadership who did not get an appointment. If you want this, really want it, you will take, re-take, and re-take those tests again with hefty doses of studying in between your efforts. Coming on this forum and seeking reassurance that your mediocre test scores will be overlooked because you play varsity sports and do community service is a total waste of your time.

    I am not trying to discourage anyone. Just don't come here looking for someone to tell you that you don't need to bother to re-take standardized tests or that your C's in high school won't matter at all. Do everything in your power to put together your very best package. Leave nothing to chance. Make no excuses. Any less effort is not worth your time.
     
  7. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    Thank you, JennyP! Very well stated! It is very frustrating, as an experienced BGO who has seen many highly qualified candidates go down in flames, to see someone either seeking the path of least resistance or being told not to sweat it, that there will be divine intervention at the last instant which will result in their receiving the big packet. Granted all 17,000 applicants may not have been stellar, and some were just taking a fling at the SAs to boost their stature. But the fact remains that year after year the SAs rank among the top ten most selective colleges/universities in the US! IMHO gaming the program is a sure path to failure, furthermore, the time and effort wasted on gaming is much better applied to doing what you know you should be doing. Best wishes to the SERIOUS candidates reading this.
     
  8. NavIss58

    NavIss58 Member

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    64 and jenny, I'm also reminded here of the "Pleeb Summer & 4/C Stories" of mostly "designed continuous failure". IF you are selected to attend, you need to ask yourself seriously, can you, will you, persist in the face of continued and unabated adversity until you've overcome all obstacles? Of stretching your limits well beyond where you, yourself, would give up trying? Can you continue to persevere in the face of all this day after day? Remember, this is not about just getting a good college education, although it is dependent on getting into one of the best colleges. Its much more then that. The application process is designed to sort out the "isn't that good enough" types before they get in. If you think you "have it in you", you can't quit at the first rejection. Or the second for that matter.

    It only gets tougher once (if) you get in. I'm also guessing here that many of these OP's haven't yet begun to approach the very daunting application process. The one after the preliminary application. Fill out the application, and another application, get medical clearance, go again for something else, get physical clearance, get MOC nomination, teacher recommendations, and (I think) the best part, background checks. I'm always surprised by the "but I was only a little bit busted" comments. Your academics, your PSAT, SAT, IQ, etc, test scores are only a small (albeit important) part of this journey. A rejection in these other areas could mean the end of the application process (understand the 3Q'd process). No single part of it is easy or the final answer.

    I think for high school kids the hardest part might be learning that standing out might mean not fitting in, that what gets you into the "clique" might keep you out of the running. I think the parents know what I mean here.

    This is not an easy road to travel. A very small percentage of high school kids consider this course of action. However, for those few that do there are many high schools out there. So even if you're a stand out in your school you must stand out in the crowd of 17,000 other like-minded individuals thinking they can get one of only 1,200 slots, all of them strong students. I'm not good with math but those odds are pretty slim to start.

    Bottom line, jenny said it, get stronger scores, keep at it, stay focused, and learn more about what the SA's are looking for (I don't think she said all that, but..) And remember, you are looking at last years, or older, qualifications, they keep getting tougher as the candidates keep getting better. Last years qualification may not be next years qualifications.

    And good luck.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2010

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