USNA Appointment Results

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by aerith, May 5, 2014.

  1. aerith

    aerith New Member

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    Recent USNA appointees and LOA receivers, what were your stats? I understand that admissions is very subjective, but I am just curious. (Btw, I am a USNA candidate applying for the C/O 2019).
     
  2. time2

    time2 Member

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    This is often asked so you can search older threads. There really isn't a lot of value in asking about stats since getting an appointment includes more then just stats (i.e. teacher & BGO recommendations) which a candidate won't typically have access to.
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Additionally, the way the appointment system works is it is geo-centric at first (MOC).

    No offense to any congressional district regarding their HS, but for example, No VA is considered a very competitive area for noms.. The state is known to share the wealth , I.e.. the MOCs talk, and it is common to get only one nom. no matter how great your stats because each Sen. Could have 750+ applicants for those ten spots. Just getting a nom. In VA feels like you have conquered the world when you realize that statistically you made the cut of 1% selected.
    ~ Fairfax county public high schools in No Va., also are consistently ranked top 100 nationally by organizations, such Time, Money, Fortune, USNWR.

    Yet, only 1 will win that appointment just like the state that is nationally ranked as the lowest educational system by the NEA. The avg SAT for Fairfax County, best sitting, not super scored is @1300. Key words avg and best sitting, especially when you realize that they will retake the tests just like everyone else. Their stats will increase and many will come off the NWL.

    Now, add into the equation that states like NC you can get 3 noms, and those stats can vary greatly compared to competitive states.

    JMPO, but I suggest you go onto the nomination forums, and search for your district if you can find it or the state, and see if they have posted their stats. As I said the first step is to get a nom., the second is to win that slate. What someone's stats are from CA when you live in Arkansas will matter when you get to the national level, and IMPO, you should want to get the appointment before hitting that pool.
    Caveat: LOAs, but understand LOAs are called the golden ticket for a reason....they are rare, otherwise posters would call them a dime a dozen. In that case, as Time2 stated it is the WHOLE package, stats, and ECs
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2014
  4. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Reading stats will either give you a false sense of security or a false sense of dread.

    Generally, to be competitive you want 650/700 SATs; top 20% of your class; mostly As in challenging (AP/IB) "core" courses, such as calc, chem, English; varsity sports, lots of leadership; great recs from your teachers.

    However, I can promise you that some candidates with the above received TWEs and some with "lesser" stats will be incoming plebes. Likewise, for every candidate admitted with X stats, at least one with almost identical stats received a TWE. The problem is that the SAs, like all excellent colleges/universities, have far more exceptionally-well qualified candidates than slots.

    The "class profile" for each class (available on the USNA website) gives you some sense of what it took to be a successful candidate. But numbers are only that; as stated above, there is more to most candidates than a series of numbers and USNA does its best to look behind the numbers, as well as at the numbers themselves.
     
  5. JShawshank

    JShawshank Member

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    Setting stats aside for a moment, my DS said his biggest take away was that he wishes he had started prepping for the USNA application process sooner just to alleviate anxiety. His goal was to have his USNA and NROTC application packs complete before Sept. 1. This means that ACT and SAT need to be taken in Spring of Junior year given that there are tests for both in June and then not again until Sept. for ACT and Oct. for SAT. DS took both tests in spring but wasn't happy with his scores overall. However, he did get his pack in by Sept. 1 and, with some confusion by recommenders regarding ROTC vs USNA, his pack was deemed complete on his portal around mid-Sept. Though he took the ACT later in Sept. his packet was reviewed before those scores were reported and he received an LOA dated Sept. 30 with DoDMERB and Nomination the only outstanding items to get an appointment (which DS did by mid-January).

    So what's my point? Stats are definitely only one part of the story. Getting your pack in early doesn't guarantee an LOA but it isn't going to hurt you. As 808Dad noted in a post on the famous "Still in the Game" thread, USNA gives some type of positive weighting to apps completed by an unspecified time in October (like EAP) per his discussion with his DS's BGO.

    Other areas to work on at end of Junior year / general thoughts:
    - Talk to your recommenders (Math and English teachers are required) and give them your desired timeline. I think the USNA system sends emails out to recommenders so you can be sure you have the right contact info for them.
    - Guidance counselor has to affirm that ExtraCurriculars are valid so you can also give them an update in advance.
    - Check your MOC deadlines and application requirements now. Some MOCs have a 'preliminary' package required before full package. Others won't open until August or later.

    Best of luck to everyone pursuing an appointment to the Class of 2019! You are in for quite the ride!
     
  6. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    My personal opinion only... It is invaluable to the candidate to start early - even as freshmen or sophomores. Meet with your guidance counselor and line up the courses you need to take to ensure that you don't get locked out, esp chemistry with lab, calculus, physics, trig, etc. Take those courses on AP level if available. Work on your leadership portfolio: student govt, sports teams captains, Eagle Scouts, Boys/Girls state, HOBY, etc. Document what you do. Try for STEM at USNA starting at end of 7th grade, apply for NASS mid Jr year, check into sports camps at NAVY, get your grades up - shoot for mostly A's, your class rank will be worth more than your GPA. Start taking SAT/ACT as a sophomore and keep going until you hit your max - you'll look better with scores in the 700's (SAT) or 30's (ACT). Do your honest best to be the best you can be! No guarantees available here, this is very competitive. Start working your nomination sources early - regardless of how many applicants there are to USNA or any of the other SA's (except USCGA), nominations are the first thinning of the herd; each year there are about 6,400 noms for the NAVY applicants, and they are the ones who will have a chance to get an appointment - just that simple. Best wishes.
     
  7. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    Yet, all those who earn nominations will not be triple qualified because MOCs do not evaluate candidates as extensively as the service academies. For instance, an MOC will not know nor care whether a candidate has asthma or has difficulty with the CFA (Candidate Fitness Assessment).

    If a candidate has a nomination and[/] is triple qualified, they are competing for an appointment among a field much smaller than 6,400.
     
  8. ND_Candidate

    ND_Candidate Member

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    I echo 1964BGO's advice, start early!!! I didn't start looking at the academy seriously until the end of junior year (various reasons), and I felt really behind in the application. I realized there was a lot of things I could have done to make my packet better, if only I had started early.

    As for stats, I won't post them. I feel bad that other people on this site that have stats that are way better than mine didn't get in, while I did.
     
  9. Dial the gate

    Dial the gate Member

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    ND_Candidate, you are very compassionate to feel bad for others; however your slot is yours! You earned it! You are the most competitive candidate on your slate. There will always be others that are better in some areas than you and you will be better than some in other ways. Make the most of your accomplishments and never look back and regret your decision to fight so hard for that appointment! Good luck and have fun!
     
  10. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    +1 :thumb:
     
  11. jebdad

    jebdad Member

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    Don't feel bad

    You should not feel bad about anything. Entry is not a contest of who has the highest ACT/SAT score. Some on these boards may make you want to feel that your ACT/SAT score is the end all be all. Obviously, you are proof that it is about the whole candidate. They are looking for well rounded people who can lead others.
     
  12. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    I don't recall saying that high SAT/ACT scores are the be all and end all for candidates, BUT I did say that high scores are more impressive than lesser scores. As late as the mid 90's USNA considered the AVERAGE of all SAT/ACT scores; going to the super scores gave candidates a huge advantage over their predecessors. Furthermore, keep in mind that SAT/ACT scores are about the only factor, other than CFA, that can be significantly improved until late in the candidate cycle.
     

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