Waiver Denied

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by usnahopeful2014, Feb 18, 2010.

  1. usnahopeful2014

    usnahopeful2014 Member

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    I just logged on to my DoDMERB account and saw that my USNA waiver was denied.

    I was disqualified for renal calculus (history of kidney stones), history of head injury (concussion), and weak or painful back.

    Can someone...anyone explain this to me because I have yet to get a satisfactory explanation. I have not had a kidney stone in over five years, my concussion was minor and I was released from the ER the same day I went, and my "weak or painful back" was normal back pain (caused by hmmm...Varsity Soccer, Varsity winter/spring track, black belt in martial arts maybe??) I wonder how I did so well on my CFA with all these ailments?

    It is my understanding that if any "conditions" are conditions that WERE and not ARE...THEY DONT EFFECT YOU ANYMORE!!. I am quite literally in the best shape of my life, my doctor tells me i'm 100% healthy, my doctor that did my DoDMERB exam said I was in good health. So this tells me that someone who has never met me disqualified me based on a piece of paper. I refuse to allow someone who has never met me/seen what I can do tell me what I can't do.

    Any suggestions on what I can do to fight this? I'll drive to Annapolis, fly to Colorado, do whatever it takes to convince whomever I need to that I am a perfectly healthy 18 year old.
     
  2. 2012mom?

    2012mom? Member

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    If you haven't done so already, contact Mr. Larry Mullen on the DoDMERB portion of this board. He may know if there are any additional medical tests or documentation you could provide to try to ask for another review.

    Good luck!
     
  3. usnahopeful2014

    usnahopeful2014 Member

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    We've spoken several times, I did the extra tests and they all showed total normality...soooo I'm confused about how normal "does not meet medical standards."
     
  4. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Because 'normal now' does not equal 'won't happen again in the future'. Accession standards are all about risk stratification.

    I understand your frustration, keep fighting until you are satisfied.

    They are looking at what would be the worst case scenario if you were to have something happen during the middle of your career. Renal stones can have a huge impact on combat readiness including the need for aeromedical evacuation from combat zones.
     
  5. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    Your questions and disappointment are certainly understandable, you might consider consulting a pediatric/adolescent urologist and if he/she feels professionally that recurrence is unlikely, request an affidavit to that effect.
    OTOH, renal calculi in someone under 18 is very rare and, if there's a family history as well, this would further increase the likelihood of recurrence.
     
  6. harmi

    harmi Member

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    USNA Hopeful 2014....I am so sorry to hear that....I really hope you can find a way to prove to them you are medically able to be appointed...I hate to read of issues like this...I have a "BLEEDING" heart for all of the candidates( my son is one waiting to hear of appointment)...Good Luck, I REALLY, REALLY hope things trun around for you!!...:wink:
     
  7. harmi

    harmi Member

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    OOPS...meant "TURN"!!
     
  8. usnahopeful2014

    usnahopeful2014 Member

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    I've consulted a nephrologist and his findings were that my chances of having another stone were next to none. The 5-6 year ago me is NOT the today me. My lifestyle habits preclude me to being at a very very low risk of a stone, about the same as any other person. That is what I was told by the nephrologist. Also there is no family history. Personally I think it was from too much soda, a very simple problem. I have not been a soda drinker now for 5 years, no problems. It frustrates me that I see these correlations, my doctors see them...but the ones who don't are the ones who count apparently? And I understand the risk behind having a kidney stone while at sea under combat conditions, but as stated, that risk is about the same as any other person NOW, especially with the kind of rigorous standards naval personnel are held to. That said I won't give up, there's no way I'm going to let so stupid non-existent medical problems hold me back from a naval career as an officer.
     
  9. pknguyen44

    pknguyen44 USNA '13, NAPS '09

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    sorry to hear but dodmerb not only determines if you're gonna be med q'd for annapolis but they look further down the line and determine if you're gonna be med q'd for commission..seeing that you had a concussion, that type of injury has a long history for future problems like NFL players who had concussions before and now have a lot of medical problems such as depression and chronic traumatic encephalopathy..you might feel fine now but later down the line something could happen..
     
  10. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    The most bureaucratic and random aspect of the whole application process, in my opinion, is the DoDMRB medical examination and determination.

    I have identical twin sons currently at the Naval Academy as Plebes. They went through the application process in parallel fashion. At the time of their DoDMRB medical examination they were both wearing braces on their teeth. The braces were scheduled to be removed in mid-June, well before reporting for I-Day. They both brought notes from their orthodontist stating this fact.

    Yet, they were handled in two completely different ways ... by the SAME examining agency!

    One twin was promptly disqualified pending a waiver.

    The other was simply sent some paperwork that required him to acknowledge that the braces had to be removed prior to reporting. This, even though he already showed them the paperwork that guaranteed that the braces would be removed.

    The twin that was disqualified (for braces on his teeth) was also told that he had a mild hernia (which we subsequently rectified), but that, surprisingly, was not documented as a disqualifier. The reason we got it promptly rectified was because I was thinking, at the last minute, they would say, "Oh, wait a minute! We just noticed that a hernia was discovered during your medical examination. You *are* disqualified. Sorry."

    Despite it being categorized as minor. Despite it not officially being designated as a disqualifier, we promptly had it rectified. We were anticipating a future retraction of his status. We wanted to be prepared by saying, "Wait a minute! Not so fast. What hernia?"

    I was amazed that something as common and mundane as braces on the teeth caused him to be labeled (disqualified) whereas something seemingly far more serious (a hernia) was met with a shrug of the shoulders.

    Unpredictable. Inconsistent. Random. And sometimes completely unfair, from what I've heard.

    Now, having bashed the DoDMRB, allow me to say that Larry Mullen is NOT part of this problem. He is part of the solution. If you get embroiled in any mess like this - he is noted for straightening it out quite quickly and fairly.
     
  11. usnahopeful2014

    usnahopeful2014 Member

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    We are in total agreement on this one. I really wish it was still done how it used to be where the medical qualification was decided by NAVY doctors at the NAVAL academy and not some board who reads and denies without EVER SEEING.

    Mr. Mullen has been helpful in explaining why I was disqualified, but so far no one including him has been able to explain to me the inconsistencies in my being told what I was disqualified for and in reality don't have if that makes any sense. I've talked to several Naval Academy grads and active duty Naval Officers and the consensus is the same. This happens, the medical stuff is bureaucratic governmental nonsense and you just need to keep bugging and pushing the people that make the decisions to give you a chance because it shows that you really want to do it. So that's my plan.

    As to the other poster who talked about the "long term effects" of my concussion. I'm sorry, but I laughed. I'm not an NFL superstar. I had one very minor concussion with no lasting effects at all. Personally I believe that since most USNA mids are Varsity sports players (like I am), I find it hard to believe that most of them have not had a concussion. Heck I'd say its a mark that your teams actually mean something :wink:
     
  12. Fuji

    Fuji Member

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    USNA Hopeful 2014,

    I am sorry to hear of your status. If you have yet to do so - I very much encourage you to review alternative educational institutions - including the senior military colleges and the state maritime academies.

    We all do not have the same medical requirements as the service academies.

    I wish you well with your future.

    Fuji
     
  13. marvin7794

    marvin7794 Member

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    Sounds like someone is recruiting. A company mate of mine got a concussion when we were plebes. They did not receive their commission, but they did get their degree. Take that for what its worth. I'm all down for honesty and integrity, but not with Navy doctors. Everyone has to figure out how to play that game for themselves though, I guess.
     
  14. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    Degree with no commission? Hey, that may not be such a bad deal. Of course, nowadays, that wouldn't be such a good deal. There are no jobs out there even if you graduate from Harvard.

    It's no accident that the Class of 2014 has record applications. The Naval Academy didn't get extremely popular overnight. It's all about the economy. While people are making less and less money ... and even losing their jobs ... the price of a college education continually goes up.

    Why?, one may ask.

    It's because colleges have learned that no matter how expensive they make their tuition, there is always SOMEBODY out there who will pay it. This is particularly true at the marquee schools (like Harvard, Yale, Stanford, etc.) If a university has 3000 openings for a freshman class, they'll find 3000 freshmen who can afford it - even if some of them come from Saudia Arabia. They don't care.

    Of course, some of these schools will hand out a few token scholarships to those who cannot afford it. They will highly publicize those type of scholarships so as to deflect the notion that they are not a completely snobbish, elitist institution. But the FACT of the matter is that it is a "sticker price" school. You can score 1600 on your SAT and you will still likely have to pay a vast majority (if not all) of the tuition. When you fill out the application they ask all kinds of questions about your parents' financial situation. They don't want to know IF you can afford the school. They are using that information to craft a customized tuition.

    Imagine if you bought ketchup at the grocery store like this. You go through the checkout line with your bottle of ketchup and ask the cashier, "How much does it cost?" And he says, "Well, how much have ya got?" The more you have in your wallet, the more the bottle of ketchup is going to cost you.

    It's practically criminal.
     
  15. pknguyen44

    pknguyen44 USNA '13, NAPS '09

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    lol im glad ur laughing because you probably didn't understand my post, i used the example of nfl players having concussions major or minor ending up with those kinds of problems..and as for being a varsity athlete myself here, if they have concussions, the navy will get them the necessary treatement as we are under their care, later if they don't get med q'd for commissioning
    2/c year, you're not getting commissioned no matter how many people you bother..this coming straight from a former mid who unfortunately was med dq'd n discharged..
     
  16. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    This will get you far in life.

    I can tell you that I personally go out of my way to make sure those who lied (failed to disclose on purpose) on medical forms in the past get handled appropriately.

    Luckily this is a rare occasion; however, I have seen it, especially with people applying to aviation ratings. Believe me, you do not want to get on the wrong side of your command's medical assets.
     
  17. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    ^^^^^

    Very true!
     
  18. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    Well, you have to look at the medical examination from a completely MEDICAL point-of-view. Do you really think the doctors care whether your high school team "actually meant something"? What if you broke your leg so severely (in a football game while scoring the winning touchdown in the state championship game) that you will walk with a limp for the rest of your life?

    "Oh, but wait, we should reconsider because, after all, he did score the winning touchdown." :smile:
     
  19. Stage4survivor

    Stage4survivor Member

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    Not what you want to hear

    NO ONE knows why some people develop kidney stones. There is some data that suggests a very small percentage of sufferers are precipitated by a short interval of extreme dehydration and those people have one such episode.

    Unfortunately, for the vast majority, there is no clear etiology and these "stone producers" will have more such episodes.
    If you understand the longstanding medical evidence, it's clear why they would consider you at high-risk for recurrence.
    Acute renal colic, as it is known, is completely debilitating. The medical axiom: The worst pain for a woman, is childbirth; the worst pain for a man, is kidney stones!
    Adolescent kidney stones incidence? You're more likely to be eaten by a shark.

    I firmly believe this is the "smoking gun" in your Dq.
     
  20. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    My older brother is one of those who, for some inexplicable reason, produces kidney stones. Hardly 5 years goes by without him having some kind of episode. Although I have never had a kidney stone, he assures me it is the most painful experience imaginable - truly debilitating.

    He jokingly said, "I should have saved all my kidney stones and made a necklace out of them." :smile:
     

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