What Is The DoDMERB?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by ballsy, Sep 23, 2014.

  1. ballsy

    ballsy Member

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    Hello. I am currently applying for the Army ROTC scholarship as a senior in high school. Being said, I have heard a lot about the DoDMERB, which I believe is a medical evaluation? What is it? Also, when do I have to do it, before or after receiving a scholarship? Any info on it would be great. Thanks!
     
  2. Ohio2015Parent

    Ohio2015Parent Member

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    Yes, a medical evaluation, typically taken after an AROTC scholarship is offered.

    The process is pretty simple - you're notified to schedule the appointments with the approved doctor/s and eye exam provider, complete an online health history(may want mom/dad/guardians help since its pretty extensive and goes back to birth) show up at the scheduled times and the information is sent back by your healthcare providers.

    Hope that helps.
     
  3. Armydad88

    Armydad88 Member

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    My DD took the medical prior to being awarded the scholarhip. It was fairly early on in the process, as I recall. It was a relatively non-intrusive medical evaluation, and she passed with flying colors.
     
  4. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Years ago they use to perform the exam prior to the scholarship being awarded, but due to budget cuts that rarely occurs now.

    Typically now if you see a ROTC scholarship candidate having it performed prior to the scholarship award, it is because the scholarship is plan B. SA candidates are sent when they are deemed competitive.

    The way the system works is Candidate Smith applies to every SA and ROTC, and let's say USMA sends them in August. AFROTC will be allowed to use the results.The commissioning branches are playing chicken. I.E. the first to order it will pay for the exam, thus by waiting a little bit longer, their chances are they can use the results for free. It is like you needing a cup of sugar....borrow from your neighbor for free instead of going out to buy sugar for yourself...and when they need the sugar they will come back and borrow from you, but sooner or later one of you will have to go out and buy the sugar, the only question is who will go out and buy it first? The answer is the one that needs it sooner!

    DoDMERB will qualify or disqualify according to the regulations set forth. If the candidate gets a DQ in something it is the commissioning source that determines if a waiver will be allowed. I.E. USNA cand decide not to waive your eye sight, but AROTC can de ice to waive.

    The big thing is if you know that you have had any medical issue since 13, get your paperwork in order now from your doc. Waivers depending on the time of year can take 3 weeks to 3 months.
    ~ Medical issues that quickly come to mind are concussions which kept you out of school, food allergies (nuts, shellfish, etc that require shots), asthma, vision rtialin, etc.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2014
  5. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Great link clarkson, and I strongly recommend every candidate, be it AROTC, NROTC or AFROTC read it.

    MODs please make this a sticky!

    The few things that people really need to understand is why a waiver is not granted. Clarkson drove home the fact this is not about you alone, it about risking the mission or forcing your peers to pick up the slack.
    ~ Can't deploy to a forward location because you need daily medicine to control the condition. The mission is still going to occur, but someone must take your place. This has a domino effect. That replacement needs a replacement, so on and so forth.

    Secondly, think of this like private health insurance regarding a pre-existing condition. Very rarely with age does a medical condition improve. The minute they waive it, they assume the costs to keep you healthy.
    ~ Use allergies as an example. If you do twenty years they are on the hook to cover you until you die, on top of the twenty years in service.

    Now, if they have more qualified candidates than slots, why should they grant the waiver?

    I am not saying they won't, I am saying that in the years I have been here waivers are not occurring at the same rate when I joined due to the fact that pool was/is large enough to not grant without doing damage.

    I also will stress when asked the question of alcohol or marijuana be honest because if you game the system and shade the truth and you need a Top Secret clearance three years later, it will be asked again. Meanwhile you forgot at 17/18 you shaded the truth and said 3, but now you say 5. In this case, somewhere along the line the number went up. Did you lie when you were 17/18 or did you do it during the past 3 years?

    Lastly, if you are athletic and play sports, the day before drink lots and lots of water. Many candidates find out that they have too much protein in their urine and are require to come back for another urine test. Drinking water and cutting down sodium prior will make it so you don't have to return for many.
     

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