ADD

Kr19203

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Dec 23, 2016
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When I was in middle school I was misdiagnosed with ADD. This diagnosis carried over to high school. I was given an IEP but I never used the benefits because I never needed to. I was in honors classes and AP courses. Once I graduated HS I went on to college and was placed on the deans list and made the honor society. I was given medicated during my sophomore year of HS but haven't taken anything since my Junior year of high school.

I was told I wouldn't be able to join AFROTC as a nursing major (4 year program) because I had an IEP in HS. I don't understand this. If I never used it and stopped taking medication and even am succeeding in college then why wouldn't I be able to join?

What makes a failing student with a criminal record and speeding tickets a better candidate than me?
 

5Day

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With a diagnosis of ADD and an IEP you are going to be medically disqualified. A waiver for ADD in near impossible. If you believe you have great medical documentation (a doctor saying you were misdiagnosed and never had ADD) you may have a slim shot at a waiver.

You are probably better off finding a different path to serve our country.
 

Maplerock

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What makes a failing student with a criminal record and speeding tickets a better candidate than me?
Well, for one... you couldn't function without special assistance. That's what an IEP does. Believe me, even though you say it was never implemented, I'm sure your high school would disagree. If you qualified for services, and had them written into your educational plan, the school was responsible to make adaptations for you.

The military is not known for making adaptations to it's personnel. As for medicine for ADD... the fact that you needed it is big. I believe you took it after any age the military would be willing to forget. I agree with 50Day, that your goals are noble, but your path will probably not include the U.S. military. Good luck.
 
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LineInTheSand

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With a diagnosis of ADD and an IEP you are going to be medically disqualified. A waiver for ADD in near impossible. If you believe you have great medical documentation (a doctor saying you were misdiagnosed and never had ADD) you may have a slim shot at a waiver.

You are probably better off finding a different path to serve our country.

A waiver for ADD is FAR from impossible.

Ask me how I know.....
 

Kr19203

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Dec 23, 2016
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Well, for one... you couldn't function without special assistance. That's what an IEP does. Believe me, even though you say it was never implemented, I'm sure your high school would disagree. If you qualified for services, and had them written into your educational plan, the school was responsible to make adaptations for you.

The military is not known for making adaptations to it's personnel. As for medicine for ADD... the fact that you needed it is big. I believe you took it after any age the military would be willing to forget. I agree with 50Day, that your goals are noble, but your path will probably not include the U.S. military. Good luck.

Coincidentally neither does college. I seem to be doing ok here. I've been told numerous times that my dreams to join the military are NOT going to come true. I guess I should just realize this and move on. Thanks for your reply.
 

LineInTheSand

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How do you know? I also need a waiver for a different issue but would like to know how you were waived

I know because I have ADD and I got a waiver. It will take some planning. You'll want to look this stuff up, but I think it's one year off medication without any kind of academic assistance (such as extended time for tests or IDPs). During that time you have to continue to do well, thus proving that you can "make it" with ADD off medication, on your own.

I can also say, it wasn't easy.
 

Kr19203

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I know because I have ADD and I got a waiver. It will take some planning. You'll want to look this stuff up, but I think it's one year off medication without any kind of academic assistance (such as extended time for tests or IDPs). During that time you have to continue to do well, thus proving that you can "make it" with ADD off medication, on your own.

I can also say, it wasn't easy.

I didn't graduate with an IDP. Idk if that'll make a difference.
 

NavyNOLA

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I know because I have ADD and I got a waiver. It will take some planning. You'll want to look this stuff up, but I think it's one year off medication without any kind of academic assistance (such as extended time for tests or IDPs). During that time you have to continue to do well, thus proving that you can "make it" with ADD off medication, on your own.

I can also say, it wasn't easy.

This is generally accurate.
 

NavyNOLA

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When I was in middle school I was misdiagnosed with ADD.
What makes a failing student with a criminal record and speeding tickets a better candidate than me?

I don't think you'll find any failing high school students with criminal records earning ROTC scholarships.
 

Kr19203

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Dec 23, 2016
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I don't think you'll find any failing high school students with criminal records earning ROTC scholarships.

I'm talking about both ROTC and basic enlistment there. Im under the impression that I can't even enlist.
 

NavyNOLA

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I'm talking about both ROTC and basic enlistment there. Im under the impression that I can't even enlist.

Read the above posts regarding general waiver process for ADD. This is not as black and white as you seem to think.
 

Jcc123

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It is waiverable. You have to have been off medication for at least two years, and be able to show satisfactory academic performance without accommodations. Son got a waiver, no problem. If you can satisfy those two requirements, you should be ok. Don't quit before you even give it a shot.
 

5Day

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With a diagnosis of ADD and an IEP you are going to be medically disqualified. A waiver for ADD in near impossible. If you believe you have great medical documentation (a doctor saying you were misdiagnosed and never had ADD) you may have a slim shot at a waiver.

You are probably better off finding a different path to serve our country.
I am glad to find out that I am WRONG.
I based my conclusion on this document https://www.jmu.edu/rotc/prospective-cadets/Non-waiverable medical conditions.pdf which has non waiverable conditons as:
a. Any behavior health condition that is recurrent, chronic or required more than 12 months of treatment/therapy. and
e. Academic disorder that was eligible for accommodations in the last 12 months.
The services may not consider ADD a "behavior health condition" and the only hurdle to have ADD waiverable would be no IEP in the last 12 months.
 

Kr19203

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Dec 23, 2016
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I am glad to find out that I am WRONG.
I based my conclusion on this document https://www.jmu.edu/rotc/prospective-cadets/Non-waiverable medical conditions.pdf which has non waiverable conditons as:
a. Any behavior health condition that is recurrent, chronic or required more than 12 months of treatment/therapy. and
e. Academic disorder that was eligible for accommodations in the last 12 months.
The services may not consider ADD a "behavior health condition" and the only hurdle to have ADD waiverable would be no IEP in the last 12 months.

I appreciate your research and your reply.
 

Kr19203

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Dec 23, 2016
Messages
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It is waiverable. You have to have been off medication for at least two years, and be able to show satisfactory academic performance without accommodations. Son got a waiver, no problem. If you can satisfy those two requirements, you should be ok. Don't quit before you even give it a shot.

I greatly appreciate your kind words. Thank you for the motivation.
 
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