Am I Competitive?

I apologize for asking a cliche question, but I am incredibly nervous about my USCGA application (which I submitted yesterday). Would any experienced users mind evaluating the general information that I am providing and producing a constructive opinion regarding whether or not my application is competitive?

My father is an active duty Marine and has served for over 24 years.

I am a senior in highschool. I am enrolled in an online school, thus my class rank is indeterminable. I have a 3.8 unweighted G.P.A and a 4.0444 weighted G.P.A. I am dual enrolled, thus I will graduate from high school with a diploma and an A.A.

I took the SAT in August and scored 690 in math and 650 in reading.

I completed 58 pushups, 83 situps, and ran the 1.5 mile in under 8 minutes, thus I recieved a score of 280 on the PFE.

I have not participated in any varsity sports; however, I have completed nine 100+ mile footraces and have set numerous age-group records. Furthermore, I have volunteered numerous hours as a member of my church's cleaning ministry, as a childcare provider, and as a pacer at the "Umstead 100."

I have worked for nine months. I often work for 30-40 hours per week. Additionally, I was nominated the "Employee of the Month" after working for a single month. Finally, I am an active participant in a local debate team and I plan to begin taking boxing lessons in preparation for boxing at the academy.

I acknowledge the fact that the information that I am providing is insufficient in regard to developing an encompassing opinion of the status of my application, but I would appreciate any opinions on my chances of admission.

Thank you for your time,
SA Hopeful
 
Your SATs translate to about a 30 ACT. For early action this may not be enough. Race, gender, and location may help you here, but if you are a white male from an affluent part of the country that has a current high representation at the academy (i.e. Virginia, Connecticut), then you probably should not have applied Early Action.
 
Unless you are in an under-represented group or a recruited athlete, you need to be over 32 for early action. I would not recommend early action, because if you are not accepted, then its over for that year, they don't group you into the regular action group. If your grades are good enough for early action, then there will still be available slots in regular action and the competition will not be as tough.
 

Alaskan

Member
Unless you are in an under-represented group or a recruited athlete, you need to be over 32 for early action. I would not recommend early action, because if you are not accepted, then its over for that year, they don't group you into the regular action group. If your grades are good enough for early action, then there will still be available slots in regular action and the competition will not be as tough.
They do have waitlists. Not always “over for the year”.
 

Alaskan

Member
I apologize for asking a cliche question, but I am incredibly nervous about my USCGA application (which I submitted yesterday). Would any experienced users mind evaluating the general information that I am providing and producing a constructive opinion regarding whether or not my application is competitive?

My father is an active duty Marine and has served for over 24 years.

I am a senior in highschool. I am enrolled in an online school, thus my class rank is indeterminable. I have a 3.8 unweighted G.P.A and a 4.0444 weighted G.P.A. I am dual enrolled, thus I will graduate from high school with a diploma and an A.A.

I took the SAT in August and scored 690 in math and 650 in reading.

I completed 58 pushups, 83 situps, and ran the 1.5 mile in under 8 minutes, thus I recieved a score of 280 on the PFE.

I have not participated in any varsity sports; however, I have completed nine 100+ mile footraces and have set numerous age-group records. Furthermore, I have volunteered numerous hours as a member of my church's cleaning ministry, as a childcare provider, and as a pacer at the "Umstead 100."

I have worked for nine months. I often work for 30-40 hours per week. Additionally, I was nominated the "Employee of the Month" after working for a single month. Finally, I am an active participant in a local debate team and I plan to begin taking boxing lessons in preparation for boxing at the academy.

I acknowledge the fact that the information that I am providing is insufficient in regard to developing an encompassing opinion of the status of my application, but I would appreciate any opinions on my chances of admission.

Thank you for your time,
SA Hopeful
You’ve got a good looking resume, as do most applicants. I think early action is a great tool for the academy and is very helpful to the applicant as well. You will know by Christmas if you’ve been accepted or waitlisted. Good luck!
 
Regular Action selections get in before wait-list Early Action. After our first hand experience, applying Early Action and getting declined but being taken in February in Regular Action the next year, I don't know why you would apply Early Action. Besides a early decision, what exactly is the advantage?
 

Alaskan

Member
Regular Action selections get in before wait-list Early Action. After our first hand experience, applying Early Action and getting declined but being taken in February in Regular Action the next year, I don't know why you would apply Early Action. Besides a early decision, what exactly is the advantage?
I think that’s a significant advantage to some. I’m not sure what the “advantage” is of regular action? A semesters difference? I wouldn’t discourage anyone from applying EA. The poster who started this discussion is going to be the same candidate applying regular action as they are EA.
 
Regular Action selections get in before wait-list Early Action. After our first hand experience, applying Early Action and getting declined but being taken in February in Regular Action the next year, I don't know why you would apply Early Action. Besides a early decision, what exactly is the advantage?
I think that’s a significant advantage to some. I’m not sure what the “advantage” is of regular action? A semesters difference? I wouldn’t discourage anyone from applying EA. The poster who started this discussion is going to be the same candidate applying regular action as they are EA.
What exactly is the advantage to EA? RA is the same candidate against a weaker group of candidates, so yes there is a better chance of looking better. Also there are additional opportunities to take ACT / SAT in October and December. Why wouldn't you take the opportunity to improve your file by retaking the ACT / SAT unless your scores are perfect. And if your scores are perfect, then I guess EA is a good option.
 
I would say the advantage of EA is a smaller pool of candidates. It was nearly a year ago and I'm not taking the time to look up exact numbers, but from what I remember, there were approximately 700 EA applicants that yielded 200 appointments, so an acceptance rate of 29%. For RA, there were 1600 applicants to yield an additional 200 appointments, so roughly a 13% acceptance rate.

DD applied RA both years, was waitlisted the first year and received an appointment 3/29/17 last year (good for you to hear in February!). After reading the experiences of others on the forum for quite a while now, DD and I both feel that she was extremely fortunate to have received an appointment out of RA. If she'd had it to do over again, she'd have applied EA the first time around.

Just our humble opinion.
 

NiceBug98

Member
Speaking from experience one of my former AO's said if you don't have anything else you can do to strengthen your application by the time it's due you might as well apply EA. I agree wholeheartedly.

My first application I applied EA, got waitlisted. My second application I applied RA, got waitlisted. Sometimes its best to apply EA just to know where your life is heading without having to wait through the RA process, and so you can get a jumpstart on accepting scholarships and such from other schools.

RA differs from EA in the sense that it continues for a longer period giving you more chances to be picked during the review process. But there's a large number of applicants and if your application looks very similar to someone from EA you're out of luck. Ultimately it boils down to factors you can't control such as the applicant pool, class size, diversity requirements, the state you live in, etc. That applies for both RA and EA. So many factors are at play here, just do your best and send in what you got. You can never do more than your best.

Your numbers match the general profile they look for in potential cadets. You can never go wrong taking the SAT again if you think you can get a higher score. Very nice PFE score. Like you said, I can't speak for your entire application since your character and leadership are also evaluated, but your activities you listed seem to point towards a strong profile overall. You're what they are looking for, but they only have so many spots to give out so without being a recruited athlete there's no way to say what your chances are.

Contact the boxing coach if you plan to go into boxing. I started a new sport myself, enjoyed it, and contacted the CGA coach. I was eventually invited to attend a practice on campus, and now the coach is supporting my Class of 2022 application this year (not to be confused with a recruited athlete). The worst they could say is no.

Stay in touch with your AO!!

Best of luck
 

Alaskan

Member
I would say the advantage of EA is a smaller pool of candidates. It was nearly a year ago and I'm not taking the time to look up exact numbers, but from what I remember, there were approximately 700 EA applicants that yielded 200 appointments, so an acceptance rate of 29%. For RA, there were 1600 applicants to yield an additional 200 appointments, so roughly a 13% acceptance rate.

DD applied RA both years, was waitlisted the first year and received an appointment 3/29/17 last year (good for you to hear in February!). After reading the experiences of others on the forum for quite a while now, DD and I both feel that she was extremely fortunate to have received an appointment out of RA. If she'd had it to do over again, she'd have applied EA the first time around.

Just our humble opinion.
That’s it. Great explanation. EA is the best route!
 

MJ2020

Member
I apologize for asking a cliche question, but I am incredibly nervous about my USCGA application (which I submitted yesterday). Would any experienced users mind evaluating the general information that I am providing and producing a constructive opinion regarding whether or not my application is competitive?

My father is an active duty Marine and has served for over 24 years.

I am a senior in highschool. I am enrolled in an online school, thus my class rank is indeterminable. I have a 3.8 unweighted G.P.A and a 4.0444 weighted G.P.A. I am dual enrolled, thus I will graduate from high school with a diploma and an A.A.

I took the SAT in August and scored 690 in math and 650 in reading.

I completed 58 pushups, 83 situps, and ran the 1.5 mile in under 8 minutes, thus I recieved a score of 280 on the PFE.

I have not participated in any varsity sports; however, I have completed nine 100+ mile footraces and have set numerous age-group records. Furthermore, I have volunteered numerous hours as a member of my church's cleaning ministry, as a childcare provider, and as a pacer at the "Umstead 100."

I have worked for nine months. I often work for 30-40 hours per week. Additionally, I was nominated the "Employee of the Month" after working for a single month. Finally, I am an active participant in a local debate team and I plan to begin taking boxing lessons in preparation for boxing at the academy.

I acknowledge the fact that the information that I am providing is insufficient in regard to developing an encompassing opinion of the status of my application, but I would appreciate any opinions on my chances of admission.

Thank you for your time,
SA Hopeful

Hi my DS is in the class of 2020. He applied EA
Gpa 4.7
ACT 32
Varsity letter: football and lacrosse
Took 12 AP classes : AP scholar
Worked 10hrs a week, 2 yrs as lifeguard and swim team coach
National Honor society, Latin honor society,
An Eagle Scout: project won district project of the year
Boy stater: commissioner of agriculture
E3 Sea Cadets: sharp shooter, 1st class swimming qualified, trained fire fighter, and crowd control.
Volunteer hours: +- 500 hrs. Mostly from summer camp counselor. President volunteer award
Travel to Europe and Asia
First chair orchestra: violin
PFE: from AIM and Summer seminar
Selected: AIM, usna Summer seminar, Army research apprentice

Was waitlisted in December and offered an appointment in April. Now in his 3rd semester at the academy, double major in EE and operations research, and in cyber security team

I hope this help!
 
I agree with Kingiskey on SAT = ACT. 690+650=1340=28 ACT. USCGA only assess English and Math. For reference, ACT E35-36 = SAT V800; ACT 34-36 = SAT M800. Good luck Candidate!
 
MJ2020 son had an excellent package for admission to EA. Nevertheless, he's a Cadet. That's all that matters. And I'm sure he's loving it!
 
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