Asthma Waiver help!!

usna_app

Member
Hi I'm hoping somebody could let me know what they think my chances may beare in receiving a waiver for asthma. I have finished everything in my USNA app but DoDMERB said that I am pending dq for asthma after 13 y/o. I do not use my inhalers anymore and I'm in great shape (maxed out on everything in CFA + 4:30 mile time). What are my chances of receiving a waiver? Also, DoDMERB requested a letter from doctor to forward to academy stating that I am healthy. Does this mean that USNA knows about my asthma already and are pursuing a waiver? Or do they not know yet and DoDMERB is being proactive? I read that USNA only pursues waivers for applicants they are considering admissable... your thoughts? Thank you so much I'm sorry I know I have a lot of questions; being in the dark with all the med info has been killing me!!!
 

Old Navy BGO

5-Year Member
Every medical condition is different, so it is impossible to comment on your chances. Provide the information requested, and be prepared to wait. There is really little value in trying to guess what Admissions and/or DODMERB are thinking.

There are several threads on this Forum about using a DODMERB Consultant. Whether to engage the consultant is purely a personal decision, but some good comments to assist you in the decision.
 

xyz321

Member
The good news is that if you have a waiver submission pending, it is still early in the process. My daughter required a waiver. It took about 4 weeks to process from the time of submission ( may vary)
 

Ex.BT.USN

5-Year Member
USNA_app,
Look at "Pending DQ" that is dated Oct. 10th. of this year, I think it will be on pg. 2 of the forum. I posted what my DS went through with getting a letter and cleared. I can't promise it will work for all; however, I do know it will be helpful.
 

MIDNDAD

10-Year Member
5-Year Member
My suggestion is to be proactive. Contact your doctor and ask him to provide medical records and to write a letter documenting your full medical history regarding your asthma treatments and most importantly when they stopped and why. If your doctor is diagnosing you as completely healthy and in no need of any type of asthma treatments, he needs to document this with medical evidence of his conclusions.

Waiting for a waiver, means the situation is out of your control, you are waiting for a decision that may never come. Flood DODMERB with evidence of your current medical situation and make them change their diagnosis. It eliminates the need for a a waiver.

Best of luck.
 
I would add a few things,
I agree you should be proactive, collect records and ask the doctor to document his/her opinion of why you don't have asthma after age 13. If all they asked for was a letter from the doctor, then that's all you should send. It seems unusual that they wouldn't request all your medical records related to a diagnosis of asthma.

Are you "pending DQ"? or are you currently DQ? or have they requested AMI and have not made a determination. If they have already determined that you are DQ, then it's difficult to get that changed, but not impossible to get a waiver. If they have not already determined that you are DQ, then the letter they requested may help them clear you.

However, I would be very careful "flooding DODMERB" with information that wasn't requested, especially if it's detailed PFT or spirometry data. The reason is that there are lots of metrics in those records (FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, and others) and you don't want to inadvertently provide DODMERB with further evidence of a DQ. The way those metrics are used is very subjective and not standard, so what you doctor says is completely normal may not be what DODMERB considers normal. I'm told it comes down to the doctor at the waiver authority reviewing the record who makes a judgement.

If you DODMERB record says "pending waiver submission from USNA" then it means that your records have been sent to USNA, they know about the DQ, and they will pursue a waiver if you are considered very competitive. It doesn't mean that USNA has initiated the waiver process.
 

usna_app

Member
I would add a few things,
I agree you should be proactive, collect records and ask the doctor to document his/her opinion of why you don't have asthma after age 13. If all they asked for was a letter from the doctor, then that's all you should send. It seems unusual that they wouldn't request all your medical records related to a diagnosis of asthma.

Are you "pending DQ"? or are you currently DQ? or have they requested AMI and have not made a determination. If they have already determined that you are DQ, then it's difficult to get that changed, but not impossible to get a waiver. If they have not already determined that you are DQ, then the letter they requested may help them clear you.

However, I would be very careful "flooding DODMERB" with information that wasn't requested, especially if it's detailed PFT or spirometry data. The reason is that there are lots of metrics in those records (FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, and others) and you don't want to inadvertently provide DODMERB with further evidence of a DQ. The way those metrics are used is very subjective and not standard, so what you doctor says is completely normal may not be what DODMERB considers normal. I'm told it comes down to the doctor at the waiver authority reviewing the record who makes a judgement.

If you DODMERB record says "pending waiver submission from USNA" then it means that your records have been sent to USNA, they know about the DQ, and they will pursue a waiver if you are considered very competitive. It doesn't mean that USNA has initiated the waiver process.
DODMERB has already ruled me as dq. They said the dr.’s letter is going to go to the academy and the choice is theirs to give me a waiver. I have not been recruited yet but I have been in contact with a coach at the academy. Do you think if I could get a quote from him vouching for my fitness and ability to compete on the d1 level would it help? I know it might be a long shot but I feel like it’s worth it, I’m very desperate. Let me know, thanks
 
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moak

Member
You can request your doctor refer you to a pulmonologist for a methacholine challenge test. This will show if you have asthma. Make sure the location where you have the test conducted is not totally polluted. Ex Los Angeles would not be advised, Santa Barbara in the coast is fine. Will probably be required to spend a few days in the clean area.
 

osmit31

New Member
You can request your doctor refer you to a pulmonologist for a methacholine challenge test. This will show if you have asthma. Make sure the location where you have the test conducted is not totally polluted. Ex Los Angeles would not be advised, Santa Barbara in the coast is fine. Will probably be required to spend a few days in the clean area.
Out of curiosity, what would happen if the test results showed the OP to have asthma? Would that immediately be reported to DoDMERB, or would the OP have that choice? Is there any possibility of a waiver at that point?
 

usna_app

Member
I believe the OP has the choice. However, I am curious if there is still a possibility of a waiver if you report that you do have asthma. Also in my case, do you believe a quote from an academy coach would have any value in the waivering process?
 

Ex.BT.USN

5-Year Member
Respectfully, be very careful with requesting the methacholine test as it can give "false" positive results. When my son worked with the pulmonologist (a recognized Navy Dr.) he went into detail about using that test should be a last ditch effort because it can actually cause an onset of asthma even with people that never had asthma. Disciss the different test and all options with your Dr.
The Dr. my DS used worked with Navy divers. If you have this resource in your area seek the Dr. out. A letter from them carries a lot of weight.
 

moak

Member
It’s true it can give s false positive & recommending it as a last ditch option is a good idea BUT if your already disqualified what do you have to loose ? Give a doc a visit, they would know more.
 

usna_app

Member
Ok I definitely will. I’ll research about a dr. with some kind of credentials like that in my area. Hopefully I can find one I will go to the pulmonologist I used to see
 

moak

Member
In reference to if it would be reported to Dodmerb should you fail the test. I don’t know how they would know. Good luck, hope it works out for you.
 

billyb

5-Year Member
I don't know much about asthma, but curious that you can have it and run a 4:30 mile. Those 2 things don't seem to go together?
 
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