CGAS - Eligible for the Post 9/11 GI Bill?

Discussion in 'Service Academy Preparatory Schools' started by Question_Asker, Dec 31, 2016.

  1. Question_Asker

    Question_Asker New Member

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    Hello,

    I was wondering if somebody to answer a question of mine. Do members of CGAS (Coast Guard prep) leave MMI/GMC/NAPS eligible for the GI Bill? The only thing I've found on the subject is here...

    https://andrewfullerblog.wordpress.com/2010/12/11/are-ex-cadets-eligible-for-the-post-911-gi-bill/

    This individual states that, if the cadet attended THE prep school for the service academy, then they may be eligible. However, because Coast Guard doesn't have a single prep school, do the sponsored cadets become eligible? The CGAS cadets are active duty (E2 rank) for the entirety of their time there, which is about 8-9 months.

    Thanks!
     
  2. trackandfield08

    trackandfield08 USCGA 2014

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    According to the VA website, "If you have at least 90 days of aggregate active duty service after Sept. 10, 2001, and are still on active duty, or if you are an honorably discharged Veteran or were discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days, you may be eligible for this VA-administered program." http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill/post911_gibill.asp

    Going by this guideline, because all CGAS prepsters are enlisted as E-2s on Active Duty until they either a) report to CGA for R-Day or b) withdraw/are removed from the program, CGAS prepsters are technically eligible for the GI Bill and may be accepted for benefits. However, keep in mind that in order to have access to 100% of the benefits provided by the GI Bill, you must serve at least 36 months on active duty. At the end of the CGAS program, you will have technically "served" approximately 1o months and are therefore only entitled to 50% of the total benefits.

    IMO, the Coast Guard has already paid for a year of college for prepsters who's only payback in terms of service has been attending classes. The GI Bill was created to give educational opportunities to those who served in an operational sense, most of whom have served on one or multiple deployments. Yes, you have a loophole of sorts to get some sort of benefit but I wouldn't say that receiving those benefits would be an ethical choice. You want money for college? Enlist, apply for scholarship or grants, fill out your FAFSA, get a job. The VA application process for the GI Bill can be full of red tape. I know of an AD Coast Guard member who applied and didn't receive his GI Bill benefits until almost 2 years after his original application.
     
  3. No1Fanof2

    No1Fanof2 Member

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    Last edited: Dec 31, 2016
  4. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    Paragraph 5i seems to be the applicable answer, and would seem to indicate no eligibility. "Initial training" usually describes OCS, OTS, boot camp, etc., for those who have not previously entered military service.
     
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  5. trackandfield08

    trackandfield08 USCGA 2014

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    I thankfully stand corrected. I was just talked with a few people on my watch section about this, it did seem ridiculous to me that receiving benefits for being a prepster with no prior military experience would be a waste of already depleted government finances.
     

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