Current Cadet- Ask Away!

KevBotss

Member
Something I’ve realized coming here is a lot of people didn’t really know what they’re getting in to and are caught off guard by the intensity as well as the change of pace and work load. If anyone has any questions about the application or cadet life please ask. The more informed you are the better off you’ll be!
 

dreamwiz

Member
Hello KevBotss,

Thank you for motivating West Point candidates!

I am planning to visit WP for an overnight visit soon.
I went to USCGA, USAFA and USNA summer seminars but WP's SLE is the only program I was not able to attend this summer. It is why I was very excited to receive a Letter of Encouragement from West Point recently. I understand that a plebe will be assigned to me during my visit.

Is there any advice or recommendation for my overnight visit?

It's just one and a half-day visit but I am feeling that it would allow me to nail down my life-long commitment for a specific branch, e.g., Army or Navy.
 

MrFiggs

Member
Hey! Just have a couple questions. Just for reference: I’m a student from St. John Bosco high school in Bellflower, CA. GPA: 4.23 ACT: 26 SAT 1250 I’m a 3 year varsity wrestler with over 150 hours of community service. I have held a variety of leadership positions including Captain of JV wrestling my freshman year, President of Chess Club, VP of political debate club, and co-Captain of my schools’s SEAL team club (we do mud-runs and train at the navy base in Coronado at the end of the year) I’m almost finished with receiving congressional nomination also. I’m hoping to major in business/management if I receive an appointment because I am currently in a 4 year business/entrepreneurship pathway (partnered with Wharton school of business) at my high school.

From your experience, what else can I be doing to make my application stand out? Also what is Westpoint looking for when they read an applicants essay? Are certain majors more selective with applicants? And if so which are the most competitive? It’s my dream to attend the USMA and hope make myself a strong applicant for an appointment!
 
1) Thanks for posting, @KevBotss
2) Where are you from?
3) Did you apply to the other SA's or ROTC programs? If so, to which other programs were you accepted and why did you choose USMA?
4) How have you enjoyed the experience thus far?
5) What surprised you the most?
6) What is your academic major?
7) Do you play a D-1 or competitive club sport?
8) What's been your favorite summer training or other extra training / activity?
9) What do you think you'll branch into and why?
 
kevbotts
It seems that in your OP you are sending a message of caution and forewarning for potential cadets to be prepared. Is there a relationship and pattern to the incident that just happened in WP? Can you elaborate more on the pace and work load, adjustment needed by a potential cadet.
 

Walman888

Member
Something I’ve realized coming here is a lot of people didn’t really know what they’re getting in to and are caught off guard by the intensity as well as the change of pace and work load. If anyone has any questions about the application or cadet life please ask. The more informed you are the better off you’ll be!
[
 

KevBotss

Member
Hello KevBotss,

Thank you for motivating West Point candidates!

I am planning to visit WP for an overnight visit soon.
I went to USCGA, USAFA and USNA summer seminars but WP's SLE is the only program I was not able to attend this summer. It is why I was very excited to receive a Letter of Encouragement from West Point recently. I understand that a plebe will be assigned to me during my visit.

Is there any advice or recommendation for my overnight visit?

It's just one and a half-day visit but I am feeling that it would allow me to nail down my life-long commitment for a specific branch, e.g., Army or Navy.
Ask a ton of questions. There is a lot of stuff here that you won’t get to see so soak up as much as possible. It’s a hectic life sometimes so try to get a feel for how you’d fit here.
 

KevBotss

Member
1) Thanks for posting, @KevBotss
2) Where are you from?
3) Did you apply to the other SA's or ROTC programs? If so, to which other programs were you accepted and why did you choose USMA?
4) How have you enjoyed the experience thus far?
5) What surprised you the most?
6) What is your academic major?
7) Do you play a D-1 or competitive club sport?
8) What's been your favorite summer training or other extra training / activity?
9) What do you think you'll branch into and why?
2- NC
3-NCSU ROTC
4-It’s hectic but enjoyable, learning a ton and just soaking it all in
5- people here are not nearly as motivated to be here as you’d expect
6-GIS or Engineering (Systems)
7-Trying our for a team
8-Live fire bounding
9-Infantry...I want to be able to lead face to face
 

KevBotss

Member
Hey! Just have a couple questions. Just for reference: I’m a student from St. John Bosco high school in Bellflower, CA. GPA: 4.23 ACT: 26 SAT 1250 I’m a 3 year varsity wrestler with over 150 hours of community service. I have held a variety of leadership positions including Captain of JV wrestling my freshman year, President of Chess Club, VP of political debate club, and co-Captain of my schools’s SEAL team club (we do mud-runs and train at the navy base in Coronado at the end of the year) I’m almost finished with receiving congressional nomination also. I’m hoping to major in business/management if I receive an appointment because I am currently in a 4 year business/entrepreneurship pathway (partnered with Wharton school of business) at my high school.

From your experience, what else can I be doing to make my application stand out? Also what is Westpoint looking for when they read an applicants essay? Are certain majors more selective with applicants? And if so which are the most competitive? It’s my dream to attend the USMA and hope make myself a strong applicant for an appointment!
Biggest thing is network and show you want it. You’re qualified. Keep working hard in classes and stay involved with friends. I let the application consume me sometimes. Enjoy your senior year and keep working hard. Contact reps and admin events and just talk to people. Match your face with you accomplishments.
 

UFDMD

Member
As a parent of a current USMA plebe I’m going to interject my 2 cents. Technology has given grade school parents the ability to monitor their child’s grades, due dates, test dates, etc..almost daily. This affords us the ability, if we so desire, to micromanage and stay on top of their success. This goes away the minute you say goodbye to them on R day. If up to this point you have relied upon your parents to manage your schedule, stay on top of your homework, remind you of test dates, motivate you to study, etc. then the schedule, academic rigor, military/physical demands and responsibilities will quickly become overwhelming. All this can wear on even the most prepared cadet which in turn can outwardly appear as a lack of motivation. It’s an emotional and physical roller coaster. Understanding and buying into the concept of delayed gratification is crucial.

I have three children and not surprisingly they are all very different. With my middle son we rarely had to manage his academics, the other two, not so much. My gut instinct was that he would be prepared to navigate the USMA journey. This has at least held true to date. He told me the cadets that are struggling are the those who do not know how to manage their time, work ahead and utilize every waking minute wisely. It is extremely difficult to wait to the last minute to complete homework, cram for a test or write a paper because you never know when you are going tasked to do something for which you hadn’t planned. West Point provides a myriad of emotional, spiritual and academic support for those that are struggling and need help, but no one is going to be there to constantly micromanage your free time.

So my advice is to look long and hard at your self discipline and motivation. If you have it then more than likely you will be successful. If not, and you truly believe in your heart that West Point (or any other SA) is for you, then begin now learning and implementing these habits of success.
 

Walman888

Member
As a parent of a current USMA plebe I’m going to interject my 2 cents. Technology has given grade school parents the ability to monitor their child’s grades, due dates, test dates, etc..almost daily. This affords us the ability, if we so desire, to micromanage and stay on top of their success. This goes away the minute you say goodbye to them on R day. If up to this point you have relied upon your parents to manage your schedule, stay on top of your homework, remind you of test dates, motivate you to study, etc. then the schedule, academic rigor, military/physical demands and responsibilities will quickly become overwhelming. All this can wear on even the most prepared cadet which in turn can outwardly appear as a lack of motivation. It’s an emotional and physical roller coaster. Understanding and buying into the concept of delayed gratification is crucial.

I have three children and not surprisingly they are all very different. With my middle son we rarely had to manage his academics, the other two, not so much. My gut instinct was that he would be prepared to navigate the USMA journey. This has at least held true to date. He told me the cadets that are struggling are the those who do not know how to manage their time, work ahead and utilize every waking minute wisely. It is extremely difficult to wait to the last minute to complete homework, cram for a test or write a paper because you never know when you are going tasked to do something for which you hadn’t planned. West Point provides a myriad of emotional, spiritual and academic support for those that are struggling and need help, but no one is going to be there to constantly micromanage your free time.

So my advice is to look long and hard at your self discipline and motivation. If you have it then more than likely you will be successful. If not, and you truly believe in your heart that West Point (or any other SA) is for you, then begin now learning and implementing these habits of success.
Well put. This rings true for so many.
 
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