DH versus DW😬

Trinigirl

Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2023
Messages
15
DS has nominations interviews in about a week. DH thinks he should wear his JROTC uniform to the interviews. I think that‘s a bit much and he should wear a suit. Dinner/dessert is riding on your answers.🤪
 
I recommend to my students to wear a suit with dress shoes. But either will work. If you son wears his uniform neatly, haircut well, shoes shined, etc., then it will make a good impression too. Just my $0.02 :)
 
I'm a ROTC cadet with no dress uniform so when I showed up to my interview, I was asked why I didn't have one on. I told the interviewers that not only did I not own one but that I also believed that the interview was a professional environment that required professional attire.
 
I'm a ROTC cadet with no dress uniform so when I showed up to my interview, I was asked why I didn't have one on. I told the interviewers that not only did I not own one but that I also believed that the interview was a professional environment that required professional attire.
Down the road, if you become a cadet or midshipman and then an officer, your dress uniform is your professional attire, suitable for a professional environment, as governed by service uniform regs and as prescribed for the occasion, so you may want to tweak that reply as necessary in context.

No doubtt you looked sharp in whatever you chose to wear.
 
DS has nominations interviews in about a week. DH thinks he should wear his JROTC uniform to the interviews. I think that‘s a bit much and he should wear a suit. Dinner/dessert is riding on your answers.🤪

My Senator’s office specified that “JROTC or Civil Air Patrol uniforms are acceptable” (otherwise, attire was business). However, given that it said “acceptable,” rather than “encouraged,” one could probably get away with either. I’ve also read that opinions often vary between offices/staffers. Your DS could always reach out to the office directly or make the final call himself (I’m sure he has an opinion on it).
 
My Senator’s office specified that “JROTC or Civil Air Patrol uniforms are acceptable” (otherwise, attire was business). However, given that it said “acceptable,” rather than “encouraged,” one could probably get away with either. I’ve also read that opinions often vary between offices/staffers. Your DS could always reach out to the office directly or make the final call himself (I’m sure he has an opinion on it).
The staffer is usually NOT the one interviewing you unless they are actually on the panels. If the panelists are veterans, especially
long service or retirees then the uniform needs to be perfect and it is very rare that JROTC uniforms are perfect as in tailored
FOR YOU, no frayed spots, properly pressed and ribbons not frayed. You can choose to believe me or not but in three decades
of doing interviews, I have yet to see a JROTC cadet whose uniform made a better impression on me than a neat jacket and tie or
equivalent for women. I recognize that you may put lots of effort into it but I and other senior vets have spent years being inspected
and doing inspections and you'd be better off not in your uniform. We'll know that you're in JROTC from your packet.

ROTC and enlisted people (including NAPS/MAPS/AFAPS) SHOULD wear their uniforms though as they are actually in the military.
 
Wear a suit. JROTC uniforms often do not fit as well as they should and they hand out ribbons like candy on Halloween. To former, active or retired service members we often get a chuckle out of JROTC uniforms with the excess of badges, ribbons, ropes, etc. Wear a suit. The uniform isn’t going to gain points at an interview.
 
Each interviewer complimented my DS when he interviewed in a suit/tie/ nice shoes and military bearing haircut from Army, Air Force, Navy in the fall of 2018 - he received 4 year scholarships from each. Your JROTC (which is different than ROTC) accomplishments will be highlighted in your application / resume and can be referenced as applicable through the interview. If he can articulate his leadership experience/ accomplishments, mentoring of others, impact he's had as a scholar, athlete, leader in the classroom, athletic field, through service and club leadership, impact on your community, and yes impact through leading in JROTC that will "speak" louder than the CAP or JROTC uniform that for minor accomplishments for some has more medals than it than was worn by the late Saddam Hussein. Sounds like your DS already has one but for other readers, anyone cannot afford a suit, good will, phone a friend are legit options.

*remember to order the lava cake concurrent with your meal, so that the kitchen has time to prepare it whilst you enjoy your victory appetizer and entree:)

Good luck to your son in his pursuit to become an officer!
 
DS has nominations interviews in about a week. DH thinks he should wear his JROTC uniform to the interviews. I think that‘s a bit much and he should wear a suit. Dinner/dessert is riding on your answers.🤪
Hopefully, your DH gets dinner/dessert despite the fact that he is wrong. I'd have agreed with you if it meant being allowed to eat. Not very principled.
 
Each interviewer complimented my DS when he interviewed in a suit/tie/ nice shoes and military bearing haircut from Army, Air Force, Navy in the fall of 2018 - he received 4 year scholarships from each. Your JROTC (which is different than ROTC) accomplishments will be highlighted in your application / resume and can be referenced as applicable through the interview. If he can articulate his leadership experience/ accomplishments, mentoring of others, impact he's had as a scholar, athlete, leader in the classroom, athletic field, through service and club leadership, impact on your community, and yes impact through leading in JROTC that will "speak" louder than the CAP or JROTC uniform that for minor accomplishments for some has more medals than it than was worn by the late Saddam Hussein. Sounds like your DS already has one but for other readers, anyone cannot afford a suit, good will, phone a friend are legit options.

*remember to order the lava cake concurrent with your meal, so that the kitchen has time to prepare it whilst you enjoy your victory appetizer and entree:)

Good luck to your son in his pursuit to become an officer!
Thank you! I think his resume will speak for itself and he will enjoy wearing his suit with his vintage cufflinks that he likes to collects.🙂
 
Is the no uniform advice the same for those attending military colleges? That is, limited to military personnel only?
 
Is the no uniform advice the same for those attending military colleges? That is, limited to military personnel only?
I have not run across this before so really don't have a strong opinion but I'd expect that at a Senior Military college, you would have been through
MANY inspections and have uniforms that are properly tailored and in good shape. If it meets all of those AND it is clean a pressed, I suppose you could but I really don't think that it gives you any additional "points" and as a civilian, it is not required/expected. Of course if you're a member of on campus ROTC, you already have my answer (above)
 
Is the no uniform advice the same for those attending military colleges? That is, limited to military personnel only?
I still sway to the side of a suit. I have only had one young man wear a uniform for his interview. It was virtual and he was at MAPS. I think his uniform would be fine, but as mentioned above, it’s not going to garner any additional points.
 
My DS wore a coat and tie to two nomination interviews with a small CAP pin on his lapel. At each interview, he said that there were other candidates that were wearing their CAP JROTC uniforms. For his final interview, he did a little research and found out that the congressperson was a member of CAP and very supportive of CAP. He asked the opinion of the group commander, and they granted permission and encouraged him to wear his uniform. Members of the panel positively commented on his uniform. He looked great in the suit and the uniform.
 
Is the no uniform advice the same for those attending military colleges? That is, limited to military personnel only?
I wore my school's Service Dress Blues to my USNA nomination interview when I was attending a maritime academy. The feedback I got was that it helped the panel envision me at USNA since the uniform was pretty much MIDN/USN SDBs with school specific insignia, ribbons, and breast devices. In my opinion, if your uniform is squared away and you have good military bearing, it gives the panel a warm and fuzzy that you would represent the district/state well at USXA.
 
Back
Top