How bad is this

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Jcoleman1232, May 30, 2017.

  1. Jcoleman1232

    Jcoleman1232 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2017
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    I want to become a naval aviator. Actually, flying any aircraft for any branch would be a dream. It is what i have aspired to be for a very long but there is only one thing I'm scared of . I took meds for anxiety and adhd off and on until the age of 13. I stopped at that age and will never take any meds again but i have been told that it could be a problem.(there is nothing else on my medical records besides this) How negatively will this effect me in the future. Please answer honestly and if you made it this far through what i have written please feel free to comment if you have an answer.
    Thanks for your time
     
  2. MAC_Daddy

    MAC_Daddy Rationalization is the enemy of excellence!

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    75
    This is not necessarily a DQ. USNA is pretty clear on medical requirements and what are and are not waiverable conditions. Be prepared to have a physician clear any medical condition that you may believe is questionable if it is no longer a condition that affects you. Good Luck!

    https://www.usna.edu/Admissions/_files/documents/MedicalAppendix1.pdf
     
    Jcoleman1232 likes this.
  3. Jcoleman1232

    Jcoleman1232 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2017
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    what about being a pilot
     
  4. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Super Moderator 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    5,660
    Likes Received:
    5,939
    Since you stopped at 13 you more than likely will be okay. Do a search for ADHD and you can find lots of old threads on this topic. Make sure you have copies of all your records. Just take the time to fill out your dodmerb paperwork. As silly as it sounds to say slowly read each question, it is important. There are lots of nuances about age, diagnosis, medication in each question.
     
    Jcoleman1232 likes this.
  5. MAC_Daddy

    MAC_Daddy Rationalization is the enemy of excellence!

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    75
    I can't answer that but others on this forum may be able to. When you enter a Service Academy or the service in general, it's with the understanding that you will be given an opportunity but never a guarantee. There a physical (size, vascular, etc), abstract reasoning abilities, problem solving, amongst a host of other variables that determine if you can be a pilot and if so what kind of pilot.
     
  6. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Super Moderator 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    5,660
    Likes Received:
    5,939
    You will have a physical your junior year at USNA or in ROTC. This physical will determine if you are qualified for pilot and any other warfare communities. Dodmerb spends a great deal of time going over your entire history. The pre-commissioning physical is much more intensive as your eyes get dialated, measurements for sit and reach are taken, and a plethora of other things. Your ADHD as a kid shouldn't impact the pre-commissioning physical, but none of us are experts. All you can do is apply and fill out the paperwork. Read this forum it will help you prepare for when you fill out the documents.
     
    Wishful likes this.
  7. 5Day

    5Day Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2015
    Messages:
    1,724
    Likes Received:
    963
    Anxity and ADHD will most likely be disqualifying, but a medical waiver is possible for both conditions. Severity and when the condition resolved will be factors in the waiver determination.

    For the Navy aviation medical requirements are here http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/nmotc/nami/arwg/Pages/AeromedicalReferenceandWaiverGuide.aspx Lots to sort through.

    It looks like ADHD will be a factor but is waiverable.
    "A diagnosis of ADHD at any time of life is considered disqualifying. Applicants with ADHD who have not taken medication for 12 months and who demonstrate no symptoms may be considered for a waiver."

    Anxiety:
    "Anxiety Disorder Due To Another Medical Condition: NCD when resolved if precipitating organic factors identified and not likely to recur. Physical illness or other disorders causing persistent delirium are permanently disqualifying and should be referred to a medical board." NCD: Not Considered Disqualifying