ICL Waiver

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by rmwalker824, Mar 31, 2017.

  1. rmwalker824

    rmwalker824 New Member

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    I'm currently active duty trying to pursue the green to gold non scholarship option. I received a corrective eye surgery (ICL) in January 2017 while I was in the army by a army surgeon at a army hospital. Keep in mind my vision was fine and correctable 20/20 before and I only got the surgery because it was available to me. For this reason I was DQ'd. Since the surgery I've been cleared for all duty including airborne. All of my packet is complete besides this physical. I've been accepted into school and the ROTC program. I'm trying to go to school this fall starting in August. Does anyone have any insight at all how long this process will take? I was hoping it wouldn't be much of a issue seeing that I am already in the Army and cleared to do everything but it's been over two weeks and it still says the waiver is pending. Any help would ne much appreciated
     
  2. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    The typical response to "how long for a waiver" is 4 weeks to 4 months, depending on complexity. 2 weeks would be lightning fast.
     
  3. rmwalker824

    rmwalker824 New Member

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    I can handle waiting as long it doesn't interfere with me attending school in the fall. I just figured it would be a very cut and try situation considering I am active duty. If am I able to perform all task in the active army then I certainly feel that my corrective eye surgery shouldn't hold me back from improving my career in ROTC......Coming in off the street I totally understand, but I was in the army when I got this surgery and it was done by a army surgeon.The only reason I was eligible is because I'm in a combat arms MOS. I was qualified to do everything prior surgery I just chose to do because the opportunity was there.
     
  4. Jcc123

    Jcc123 5-Year Member

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    Retention standards are different than enlistment/accession standards. I'm assuming you'll be fine, but it's not just a "check the box" type approval. Good luck!
     
  5. rmwalker824

    rmwalker824 New Member

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    I received a email this morning saying my waiver request has been reviewed by the cadet command and has now been sent up to the Surgeon General for further review with a Consultant who specializes in this disqualification. Hopefully I'll be hearing back good news. Does anyone know anyone who has been in a similar situation? I think the main reason that this is a issues is because the surgery was in Jan of 2017 and it's been less than 6 months but by the time I start school in the fall it will be almost 8 months so I'm hoping that won't be a issue.
     
  6. moong1009

    moong1009 New Member

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    Any updates on your waiver? I'm on the same boat. Active duty and had ICL 2 years ago while I was in the Army. I'm in AECP (AMEDD Enlisted Commissioning Program). Complete everything besides commissioning physical to get order.
     
  7. BenMartinez17

    BenMartinez17 New Member

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    Hey. I just turned 19, I had ICL surgery on January 4th to correct my vision. I was DQ from the Navy in October because my eye sight was too poor. I didn't qualify for lasik or prk so I had ICL done. Literally no Recruiter knows anything about the surgery, so no one told me it was disqualifying. It's been 8 almost 9 months since the surgery. I had to have a waiver for the surgery and the docs in the navy denied it, the Marines have the same doctors as the Navy. So I'm trying to go into the Army now. At the moment I've waited a month just for whoever at meps to see my medical documents and give me the go ahead or the "you need a waiver". By the way I have already been to meps through the navy and my eye sight was the only disqualification, I went through everything else, my glasses use to be big af, my eyesight is pristine now haha. Waiting is a huge bummer, so if anyone knows anything then hmu please !!
     
  8. Mama4te

    Mama4te New Member

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    My 19 year old daughter is currently scheduled for ICL surgery w a -11 refraction. I’ve heard -8 is max For acceptance into the military. I know there are waivers but I am hoping when she has completed college in 2 years the military will have changed its policy. Losing out on a lot of great candidates due to this policy.
     
  9. kp2001

    kp2001 10-Year Member

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    DO NOT do the surgery if you want to serve in the military. You are extremely unlikely to get a waiver for enlistment or commissioning with that surgery.

    It is likely to be approved in the future, but right now that is not a good idea. The surgery itself is a good option, but not for those looking to join. We do it on active duty now, but not approved for accessions.
     
  10. Amhagstr

    Amhagstr New Member

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    Hello Sir, as someone who is looking into ICL surgery in order to try out for Navy Seals, I am curious: Why do you say it so hard to get a waiver for ICLs? What is your personal experience with getting waivers for ICLs? Are you speaking from your experience of the navy or from other branches as well? Thank much.

    -Andrew
     
  11. kp2001

    kp2001 10-Year Member

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    I have not seen an applicant with ICL be waived. I am unaware if SEALS allow ICLs although I would tend to doubt it since aviation has yet to clear it either.

    ICLs are a good option for many people; however, intraocular surgery has risks and some risks that are perpetual after surgery (e.g. easier to have a ruptured globe, ICL dislocation, etc). Although these are rare the risk would be increased for those doing high risk activities.