Impact of Sea Cadets on USNA app/Tips for RT?

OZZY

Member
As a recruit I was wondering how being a Sea Cadet would affect your app. I know SC itself doesn't make that big of a difference, but in what ways would it help (being Chief, honor cadet, etc...)? It does prepare you for the military but what is its value on one's application?

Also, RT starts in one week. What are some things I should know and how can I prepare? I've been running, preparing for the PRT, trying to memorize the GOs, but what else should I do? Any useful tips or advice? Getting more nervous as RT comes closer :-(
 

Old Navy BGO

5-Year Member
I believe I have seen some Sea Cadet parents on here, and someone will have ancedotal stories about how DS/DD got into USNA because of their involvement in Sea Cadets, but the truth is nobody really knows what impact participating in Sea Cadets and everybody's experience is different. USNA does report statistics that approximately 20% of an incoming class has participated in Sea Cadets/JROTC/Civil Air Patrol or similar programs, and participating certainly doesn't hurt your chance...but the key is to stand out and become a leader in these programs. It doesn't happen overnight, but apply yourself and the opportunities will develop. I was not in Sea Cadets, but was an Eagle Scout and was leader of my Civil Air Patrol Cadet Squadron , and am sure those things helped me overcome my less than stellar HS academic record.

As to RT -- no idea what that involves, but my advice would be the same as CAP , Boy Scouts or Plebe Summer... its too late to worry about preparation, bring everything they told you to bring (and don't bring what they told you not too), go in with a good attitude , apply yourself and work with your peers -- you want to stand out, positively, and you won't do that as a lone wolf or someone trying to climb to the top by stomping on your peers. Finally, have fun....
 
USNSCC PO1 (soon to be USN MIDN 4/C) here.

If you're talking honor cadet as in being the best cadet at a one/two week long training, that is insignificant to a USNA application. I wouldn't even try to bring that up in any interview for USNA/nominations. Being a USNSCC Chief might be something significant in a USNA application, but only if you are able to describe the leadership role you had with your unit and how you developed and contributed to the other cadets.

If you are talking about USNSCC RT, don't fret about the physical training. If you're remotely athletic, it will be a peace of cake. Where are you going by chance? If you are going to great lakes then you PT one time out of the nine(?) days that the training lasts.

I'm assuming you are going into or were just in 9th grade. My advice is focus on school and make sure that transcript looks good. Don't be nervous about the sea cadets, it's supposed to be a fun program. Involve yourself in more than USNSCC as well. It won't carry a weak application to acceptance.
 

OZZY

Member
USNSCC PO1 (soon to be USN MIDN 4/C) here.

If you're talking honor cadet as in being the best cadet at a one/two week long training, that is insignificant to a USNA application. I wouldn't even try to bring that up in any interview for USNA/nominations. Being a USNSCC Chief might be something significant in a USNA application, but only if you are able to describe the leadership role you had with your unit and how you developed and contributed to the other cadets.

If you are talking about USNSCC RT, don't fret about the physical training. If you're remotely athletic, it will be a peace of cake. Where are you going by chance? If you are going to great lakes then you PT one time out of the nine(?) days that the training lasts.

I'm assuming you are going into or were just in 9th grade. My advice is focus on school and make sure that transcript looks good. Don't be nervous about the sea cadets, it's supposed to be a fun program. Involve yourself in more than USNSCC as well. It won't carry a weak application to acceptance.
I believe we PT every day at Fort Devens, for 1-2 hours. From what I've heard, it's pretty difficult. I wouldn't consider myself athletic, my avg. mile time is 10:45ish, I don't play many sports (and I'm not good at the two I play), and it's hard for me to keep up with the PT at drill. I'm trying to be optimistic as it comes closer and trust the Ft. Devens graduates that told me it isn't that bad... just a few more days until I find out if that's true:confused:
USNSCC isn't of much importance to an app, and I know to do a lot more than just that, but so far it has been fun and enjoyable. I'm pretty good academically and will try to get more involved in sports. Thank you, by the way!
 

seacadetmum

Member
Sea Cadets in itself doesn't do much for an app but the leadership experience you get does, especially if there are not many opportunities available. My dd is small for her age (4'9) and is the youngest in our family. It wasn't until she joined Sea Cadets that she was given the opportunity to show leadership skills. She's only been in a year and she's advanced to PO3 as an LC, is current LPO of the LC division for our 10-11 year olds, and is staffing the League orientation in a couple weeks.
RT is not bad. It's other cadets staffing and they will yell but dd just let's it go in one ear and out the other. If you have been paying attention at drill you will already know a lot of the information they give you. Just keep pushing yourself with PT, dd's friend quit SC after a few months because she was afraid she would never get her mile time down. You will get there, Rome wasn't built in a day.
 

OZZY

Member
Sea Cadets in itself doesn't do much for an app but the leadership experience you get does, especially if there are not many opportunities available. My dd is small for her age (4'9) and is the youngest in our family. It wasn't until she joined Sea Cadets that she was given the opportunity to show leadership skills. She's only been in a year and she's advanced to PO3 as an LC, is current LPO of the LC division for our 10-11 year olds, and is staffing the League orientation in a couple weeks.
RT is not bad. It's other cadets staffing and they will yell but dd just let's it go in one ear and out the other. If you have been paying attention at drill you will already know a lot of the information they give you. Just keep pushing yourself with PT, dd's friend quit SC after a few months because she was afraid she would never get her mile time down. You will get there, Rome wasn't built in a day.
One of the things I'm looking for during my time in SC is leadership. This is the youngest I could go to RT (I hadn't heard of SC when I had the chance to become a LC, so unfortunately I don't have the opportunity to graduate as an E-3 like your DD would) so technically I could become LPO or Chief, which would provide me with leadership opportunities. I'll try to enjoy RT, I guess it'll be better if I'm optimistic:)
 

cabarle

5-Year Member
One of the things I'm looking for during my time in SC is leadership. This is the youngest I could go to RT (I hadn't heard of SC when I had the chance to become a LC, so unfortunately I don't have the opportunity to graduate as an E-3 like your DD would) so technically I could become LPO or Chief, which would provide me with leadership opportunities. I'll try to enjoy RT, I guess it'll be better if I'm optimistic:)
I'm a fan of the Sea Cadet program and truly enjoy maximizing their exposure to USNA. Have to agree with the theme here as I've seen 17 year olds apply in the program because they think it looks good for admissions. I'm also the C.O. of Knighthawk Squadron in Vienna, OH. Let me know if I can assist.
 

NotCollegeMom

New Member
The Sea Cadets are allotted something like 100 slots in each class. From a percentage standpoint that's fairly significant. From a leadership perspective DD learned great lessons about motivating, encouraging, and disciplining other cadets. All of these was under the watchful eye of a retired Chief and LtJG. DD was also exposed to the enlisted reservists who trained at the facility where Sea Cadets met. Each year she did about 4 weeks of full time training. I believe her experience helped her in admissions and is helping her get through plebe summer. However she loved Sea Cadets and looked for the hardest trainings she could find. So like any extracurricular activity do it because you enjoy it and want to excel and not just to tick off another box.
 

Old Navy BGO

5-Year Member
The Sea Cadets are allotted something like 100 slots in each class
Not sure of the source of this information. 15% of the Class of 2020 (2021 stats are not released yet) participated in JROTC/Sea Cadets/Civil Air Patrol, but I have never heard of any "allotment" specifically for Sea Cadets. JROTC can also serve as a nominating source, but I don't think this extends to Sea Cadets. Not saying Sea Cadets isn't a good program, and good source of leadership experience, but it's just one of the many activities that can contribute to a successful application. (Google "USNA Class Profile" or "USNA Class Portrait" and you can find information on recent classes).
 

Capt MJ

10-Year Member
Not sure of the source of this information. 15% of the Class of 2020 (2021 stats are not released yet) participated in JROTC/Sea Cadets/Civil Air Patrol, but I have never heard of any "allotment" specifically for Sea Cadets. JROTC can also serve as a nominating source, but I don't think this extends to Sea Cadets. Not saying Sea Cadets isn't a good program, and good source of leadership experience, but it's just one of the many activities that can contribute to a successful application. (Google "USNA Class Profile" or "USNA Class Portrait" and you can find information on recent classes).
That's correct. NJROTC has nomination ability, as specified in regs.

Sea Cadets is an independent non-profit youth leadership organization that is officially recognized by both Navy and Coast Guard as a youth activity. Some benefits can accrue to former Sea Cadets who enlist. See link:
http://www.seacadets.org/benefits/
The "100 slots" is probably a conflation of a stat about USNA mids who listed it as a leadership activity.

Here's the info about NJROTC noms to USNA:

https://www.usna.edu/Admissions/Steps-for-Admission/Nomination-Sources/NROTC-Units.php
 

OZZY

Member
I got back from RT two nights ago. People were surprised about this but I had a lot of fun and really miss it. I thought PT was going to be difficult, but it really wasn't too bad. The hard part was the running, and it was tough for the first week, but the second week it felt a lot easier. That was the first time I had ever had fun doing PT.

So like any extracurricular activity do it because you enjoy it and want to excel and not just to tick off another box
I really do enjoy being a Sea Cadet and I'm in to have fun. I also happen to have an interest in the academy and wanted to know how being a cadet would help. By the way, does anybody have any recommendations for winter training? I'm new to the world of advanced trainings and have no clue which ones are out there. I'm looking to staff at RT next year if that would make any difference.

I wish there was JROTC at my school. I've also been considering CAP, but I've also been told that it sucks and SC is a lot better. I'm not looking to see which one is better, just trying to experience and look at the different aspects of the military. I probably won't join but any opinions or comments or whatever would be nice. Thanks to everyone for the replies.
 

Old Navy BGO

5-Year Member
I did CAP long ago..probably pretty similar, but USAF biased rather than Navy. CAP does have a real world, operational mission in supporting Search and Rescue and is considered an Auxiliary of the Air Force rather than independant organization, but realistically, that doesn't mean alot from the Cadet perspective. I think I participated in a couple SAR exercises, but my experience with Boy Scouts was better.
 
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