Military pre-med vs NROTC

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by vcent@2021, May 27, 2017.

  1. vcent@2021

    vcent@2021 Member

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    Hello all,

    I was rejected from USNA a while back, and although 2 years of preparing for my candidate application seems to go down the toilet, I have had the honor to receive the national 4-year NROTC scholarship to a Big-10 school (go Illini!) However, doing further research into the requisites of the program, it seems as that I would be unable to pursue a pre-med coursework effectively while under contract at UIUC.

    Having spent time in my high school career volunteering at the local hospital, doing an internship at a dental clinic and working as a scribe at the VA, I've grown to love and appreciate the field of healthcare. Having done research when it comes to programs such as HPSP and the USUHS (the west-point of medical schools) I think my dream career is to be a military phyisican, attached to a front-line army/marine corps combat unit. This way, I can contribute to my country by saving the lives of wounded servicemen/women who gave up everything on the line of duty.

    However, pre-med coursework is known for being difficult and time-consuming, and the grades/MCAT/ clinical hours needed to apply to medical school is very daunting: so many people drop out of this coursework when "sh*t hits the fan" and their grades dont make the cut.

    I was able to receive a full scholarship (civilian one) to a public school in california belonging to the UC system, which has the tools necessary for a medical school pathway.

    I'm willing go balls to the wall, and to devote myself to academic/intellectual excellence to become the best doctor I can in service of my country, but I have doubts whether or not i can make it. Med school is no guarantee for anybody; but I'm willing to do what it takes.

    So my question to all of you, is should i pursue NROTC and become a commissioned officer in my warfare specialty, a career that guaranteed (assuming i dont do anything stupid) or should I go to my state school and pursue a pre-med coursework with the goal of becoming a military doc?
     
  2. bman

    bman Member

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    If your goal is to be a doctor, then NROTC is probably not the way to go as your chances are very limited to go to medical school out of college. Army ROTC may be a better option. My DD just commissioned through NROTC and had only two in her class at college who were Army ROTC, but both of them were going on to medical school to serve as doctors in the army. If you have a full ride to college and can go pre-med, that is probably your best route. You could possibly go OCS and even if not picked up for medical school, you could serve your minimum commitment, use GI Bill benefits to help pay for med school, and then go back into the service afterwards.
     
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  3. CL123

    CL123 Member

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    You can go pre-med at a civilian school on your CIV scholarship, then join the Army and have them pay for your med school. In a round about way. I work at a hospital (medic) and the docs I work with all went civilian route for undergrad, then joined the Army to pay for med school.
     
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  4. AROTC Parent

    AROTC Parent 5-Year Member

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    Take the civilian scholarship to a UC and then consider HPSP or USUHS when you are ready to apply to Med School.

    A premed curriculum is hard enough on its own without the distraction of ROTC.
     
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  5. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

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  6. CL123

    CL123 Member

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    To add to what I said earlier, the Army will obviously be there when you get done with undergrad. If you want to be the best you can be at what you do, you have to completely buy into it. If you cant give your all to pre med or you know you aren't the type that can learn quickly and ace all of the tests, I think it's important to weigh your options here. Good things come to those who wait and the Army would much rather have someone prepared for the job at a later date than someone jumping in too quick. I'm the type that needs that extra study hall/time aside with the professor, so I'm just giving you my viewpoint on it.
     
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  7. vcent@2021

    vcent@2021 Member

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    thank you ALL Cl123, AROTC-dad. AROTC parent, and bman for your input! Really makes my decisions to pursue a civilian undergrad more crystal-clear. It's now HPSP/USUHS or bust
     
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  8. AROTC Parent

    AROTC Parent 5-Year Member

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    Check out the Navy HSCP program too. Health Services Collegiate Program. Another option is called FAP (financial assistance program) for after you complete medical school and have a residency match in a specialty in need by the military.

    If you have a sincere interest in serving in the military as a physician and get an MD or DO acceptance you will be competitive for the scholarship/financial assistance programs. Generally, the medical school acceptance is the hard part.
     
  9. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G. 5-Year Member

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    ROTC (outside of the nurses and dietitians) isn't designed to create medical officers. You have to ask yourself if you'd be just as happy as a logistics officer. If not, then ROTC isn't for you.
     
  10. vcent@2021

    vcent@2021 Member

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    a career as an unrestricted line officer in my opinion beats working a 9-5 job in a company run by h1b visa holders anyday, in my opinoin