New eczema guidelines?

NavyHoops

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Was wondering how that would impact waivers for the USAF commissioning sources. Maybe Marysb can chime in on his thoughts on where this will go for DoDMBER related Q/DQ and waivers for USAF?
 

5Day

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@Klone i would definitely ask your cadre if your waiver would be reevaluated in light of the new policy. Bring a copy of the article. Your cadre may not know about it. Besides, what do you have to loose. Worst they can do is say no again.
 

Radkid

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Klone, I am in the exact same boat. I was told that it takes effect 1 Feb 2017. I am hoping that I can submit a rebuttal and have my waiver denial overturned in Feb.
 

Capt MJ

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"Eczema: Select candidates medically classified as having mild forms of eczema will be processed for a waiver. Certain occupational restrictions may be applied to secure personal and mission safety."

I excerpted this from the link in an earlier post.

I think the key words will be "select" and "certain occupational restrictions" and the all-important "personal and mission safety." Safety will be the decider. If an outbreak of the condition could potentially interfere with wearing of safety gear or impacting the mission, that might not be waiverable. That is my WAG, seeing a very rough parallel to USNA issuing a handful of waivers for color blindness, knowing those appointees will be restricted to certain warfare communities.

I am sure this is being asked by AFROTC and AFA hopefuls around the country. I am equally sure policy is/has been formulated at HQ level and will be passed down to waiver authorities and elsewhere in the chain of command.
 

Capt MJ

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As a side note, if candidates, appointees and families ever wonder what officers do on headquarters staff duty, if I pulled aside the curtain, you would see:

- staff officers and SME civilian analysts from the manpower, training, safety, medical, and other interested staff directorates, all producing and coordinating analyses, stats, medical research, opinions, across, up, down and out to field commands for comment
- one staff directorate would be project lead
- some defense contractor analysts would be thrown at it for good measure
- liaison with sister services and input on their current practices and policies reviewed and compared
- advance liaison with interested parties on DOD staff would occur
- PowerPoints would multiply like ants at a picnic near the pie plate
- meetings, briefings, re-circulation of the latest draft decision paper for review, comment, sign-off would pop up in electronic tasker coordination queues (the "chop chain" in Navy talk, not sure of AF term)
- at some point, a decision package with proposal, background, analysis, plenty of cool graphs, risk summaries, recommendations, draft policy, draft HQ message, timeline for implementation, action steps, press release plan - lands on the desk of the decision-maker.
- decision gets made, execution begins - publishing policy, sending out taskers and timelines, coordinating press releases, solving unanticipated glitches.
- the grease in this whole process is the staff officers keeping it moving, evolving and accurate


Ahhh... action officer staff duty, a rite of passage for most mid-grade and senior officers before the blessed relief of heading back out for operational duty away from HQ.

I wrote this based on Navy and Joint Staff duty, and to share some knowledge for those whom military officer life is a mystery. I am confident my AF kin here will generally agree with my description.
 

ROTCparent

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My DS was DQ'd for eczema a couple of months ago; he has an AFROTC scholarship and a NROTC scholarship. When AFROTC got the waiver request they DQ'd my DS again right away, and a woman I spoke with at AFROTC said that regardless of how minor DS's eczema was, they would not give a waiver -- she said they are very strict on eczema. Notwithstanding what she said we then had DS's pediatrician write a letter stating that the two instances when he had eczema were very mild, very treatable, resolved quickly, and he doesn't need medication. Then we also had him seen by a retired Army Colonel who was a dermatologist in the Army Medical Corps for 25 years, currently a practicing dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon as a civilian. He examined DS and wrote a really good letter with his medical exam, stating, among other things, that DS has no tell-tale signs of chronic eczema, and recommended that he be granted a waiver, and predicted that he would be world-wide deployable with little problems. AFROTC then changed his status from "waiver denied/DQ" to "pending waiver review/remedial" and sent a letter asking for all his medical records relating to his two mild instances of eczema. We are sending those in right away, fingers crossed he gets a waiver. I think the woman I spoke with at AFROTC wasn't aware of the new policy. Happily, NROTC just granted DS a waiver yesterday (yeah!!!). NROTC seems to be more lenient on eczema, they never asked for additional information -- though I'm sure they saw the letter from the Army dermatologist, that must have helped.
 

ROTCparent

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Air Force ROTC just granted my DS a medical waiver for his mild eczema -- yeah!! Maybe the new guidelines had something to do with it.
 

5Day

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My DS was DQ'd for eczema a couple of months ago; he has an AFROTC scholarship and a NROTC scholarship. When AFROTC got the waiver request they DQ'd my DS again right away, and a woman I spoke with at AFROTC said that regardless of how minor DS's eczema was, they would not give a waiver -- she said they are very strict on eczema. Notwithstanding what she said we then had DS's pediatrician write a letter stating that the two instances when he had eczema were very mild, very treatable, resolved quickly, and he doesn't need medication. Then we also had him seen by a retired Army Colonel who was a dermatologist in the Army Medical Corps for 25 years, currently a practicing dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon as a civilian. He examined DS and wrote a really good letter with his medical exam, stating, among other things, that DS has no tell-tale signs of chronic eczema, and recommended that he be granted a waiver, and predicted that he would be world-wide deployable with little problems. AFROTC then changed his status from "waiver denied/DQ" to "pending waiver review/remedial" and sent a letter asking for all his medical records relating to his two mild instances of eczema. We are sending those in right away, fingers crossed he gets a waiver. I think the woman I spoke with at AFROTC wasn't aware of the new policy. Happily, NROTC just granted DS a waiver yesterday (yeah!!!). NROTC seems to be more lenient on eczema, they never asked for additional information -- though I'm sure they saw the letter from the Army dermatologist, that must have helped.
Air Force ROTC just granted my DS a medical waiver for his mild eczema -- yeah!! Maybe the new guidelines had something to do with it.
Great news and congratulations. You did a great job "working" the system to get the waiver.
 
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