Peanut allergy

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by Klimps, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. Klimps

    Klimps New Member

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    Recently I learned that my friend applied to USAFAC and was DQ’d after doctors found he was allergic to peanuts. I was interested in applying to the academy as well but I also have a peanut allergy.

    I’m not sure on how severe his allergy was but mine is very mild. I can eat around a teaspoon of peanut butter and only have an itchy mouth and skin.

    I’m only a sophomore in highschool and I don’t know if this should be my path for becoming a pilot now. What do you think my chances of being dq’d are?
     
  2. THParent

    THParent Member

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    I will start by saying that I'm not a doctor, and I don't work for DoDMERB.
    Has it been documented by a doctor? Have you been officially diagnosed with a peanut allergy?
    Maybe peanuts "just don't agree with you" or you "just don't like peanuts" and you really don't have a peanut allergy.
    If not eating peanut butter is the answer to what sounds like a very minor reaction, then there is the very real possibility that you just may THINK you have a peanut allergy.
    Maybe the itchy mouth and skin were caused by the grape jelly, or the bread you had it on was bad? You wouldn't know for SURE unless a doctor tested you.

    So in other words, if you "think" you "may" have a peanut allergy, but it has never been diagnosed and documented, you don't technically have a peanut allergy.
    If it has been diagnosed and documented - then it's a DQ - which probably isn't something you can get a waiver for.
     
    Ptsv and c17hopeful like this.
  3. Falcon A

    Falcon A Member

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    ^^^^
    I agree with everything that THParent wrote except for the very last sentence . . .

    The USAFA medical waiver authority has been very "hard" in the past on granting medical waivers for peanut or treenut allergies. If you do have an allergy, DoDMERB will classify you as "DQ" and then USAFA Admissions will have to determine if they want to put you forward for a medical waiver. (If USAFA Admissions thinks you are competitive to gain an appointment, they will put you forward.) The USAFA medical waiver authority will then look at your file. They may request blood tests and/or an allergist supervised "nut challenge" to prove you don't have an allergy.

    In the recent past the Army (USMA and AROTC) have been more reasonable in granting such medical waivers. Not sure about the Navy.

    Best wishes to you . . . and thanks for being willing to serve
     
  4. pa_ptmom

    pa_ptmom Member

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    Check out the current thread on the DoDMERB page regarding this. They are referring to a test/treatment OIT that can be done over a period of 6-12 months for tree nut allergies. Since you’re a sophomore, this might give you hope for a resolution before you start applying. Good luck!
     
  5. THParent

    THParent Member

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    Ah! That may be good news for our OP here. It hadn't occurred to me that the different SAs may have different views on the peanut allergy thing.
    You would think there would be a standard from one branch to another, but that would make way too much sense.
    This sort of brain-flatulence is probably why the Navy wore that ridiculous blueberry work uniform for so many years. ;)
     
  6. THParent

    THParent Member

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    Also, a Peanut is a legume, not a nut. If you're allergic to Peanuts, you MAY be allergic to Tree nuts, but it's not a given.
    From what I have read, a Tree nut allergen test may not mean anything when it comes to Peanut allergies, since less than 40% of those allergic to Peanuts are also allergic to Tree nuts (and vice-versa).

    Tree nuts are typically; Almonds, Brazil nuts , Cashews, Chestnuts, Coconuts, Filberts/Hazelnuts, Macadamia nuts, Pecans, Pistachios, Pine nuts, Shea nuts and Walnuts. (I had to look that up, and I have never heard of a Shea nut).