PRK/LASIK restrictions?

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by gama2017, Oct 21, 2018.

  1. gama2017

    gama2017 New Member

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    Can someone enter pilot training if they receive eye surgery? My eyesight is 20/400. I'm an enlisted Airman with aspirations to attend the US Air Force Academy. If the opportunity to become a pilot was there I would definitely take it, but if the eyesight requirement prevents it from happening then I wouldn't be upset. Anyone have information on this?
     
  2. GoCubbies

    GoCubbies Member

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    A couple things go into vision requirements:

    1) visual acuity - yours is 20/400. That’s pretty bad. Definitely not within pilot applicant standards.

    2) refraction- this is the amount of correction needed to get you to 20/20. There’s a standard for this too.

    What is your eye glasses prescription?
     
  3. gama2017

    gama2017 New Member

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    -5 and 5.25. My question is more about entering pilot training after eye surgery. If eyesight was correctable to 20/20 then would someone be able to enter into pilot training. I know obviously right now that my eyesight is nowhere near acceptable standards, but after eye surgery would that career field be an option.
     
  4. Hoodlum15

    Hoodlum15 Member

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    Hundreds of cadets from USAFA get eye surgery each year in order to fly. It's extremely common. Just make sure you don't get surgery before (presumably) coming to USAFA. Getting it done beforehand can be disqualifying. Disclaimer: I'm not sure how those limitations apply to someone already in the Air Force.
     
  5. Tex232

    Tex232 Member

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    Technically it is "disqualifying" per se but you are automatically considered for a waiver when getting a flight physical. The AF almost always waives it so long as you are a certain amount of time post op (a year I believe) and that you have no other disqualifying conditions related to the eye. Other than that however, in my experience the flight surgeons working for the Air Force also tend to be unreasonably stringent, which, for the OP, can kill your flying aspirations if you are unlucky enough to get evaluated by a dirtball flight doc. The AF theoretically evaluates potential flyers to the first class medical standard established by the FAA, yet I can think of multiple instances in which they would not qualify someone who is able to pass the FAA medical. You may or may not want to at least think about one of the other services if you really want to fly, and I'm not saying that you cannot or should not fly for the AF, just that it is not the end-all-be-all.
     
  6. GoCubbies

    GoCubbies Member

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    If you were to get corneal refractive surgery as a cadet at the USAFA, then your current refraction is within the waiverable standards.