Question about when Service Time starts?

Joined
Jan 2, 2017
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My DS just accepted appointment to USNA. Can anyone tell me when the clock starts for his service time that counts toward promotions, retirement etc... since he will be on active duty on I-Day is that when it starts or when he graduates in 2021.

Thank you!
 

gonavy14

5-Year Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2014
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41
Years at the academy count as federal service, and they are considered active military during this time. Time at the academy does not count towards military retirement though.
 

Sydney C.

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Oct 18, 2013
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696
I'm quoting LineInTheSand from a 2014 post in answer to a similar question as yours:

The clock for your rank as an officer only starts once you've commissioned as an officer. At the Naval Academy that clock starts the day you graduate. If your buddies graduate two years ahead of you, they are two years ahead in the promotion schedule.
Consider your rank before commission as one big blob of "midshipman" and not as "a 4/c" or "a 3/c".... the promotion clock starts once you graduate and get your commission.
 

Capt MJ

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Sep 27, 2008
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In general:

Promotions: When he is commissioned as an ensign or second lieutenant (paygrade O-1) on Comm Day, he is assigned a unique lineal number and his date of rank is that day. Lineal number is where he ranks in seniority compared to all other officers in his service. OCS, ROTC, direct commission programs, same. The date of rank (he will have subsequent ones) and lineal number (never changes) are the markers for all subsequent promotions. First two promotions are fog-a-mirror: with sufficient time in grade, acceptable performance and reporting senior's recommendation for promotion to next rank. O-4 (lieutenant commander, major) promotion is a competitive board selection.

Retirement: USNA time does not count for military retirement. It can be factored into Federal/civil service retirement. Example: USNA grad leaves AD, goes to work for HLS as a civilian program analyst, can count USNA years toward Fed retirement. Very rough description.

Most officers have no clue about their lineal number until they are more senior. Some fun stories...Navy ships often tie up to the pier in a nest, with ships tied to each other. Unless operational needs dictate, the senior CO gets the preferred inboard berth, the pierside one. How determined? Lowest lineal number. You could have 3 USNA classmates, all destroyer skippers, all same rank, and their lineal numbers will determine seniority. Goes back to class order of merit. Or you could have an OCS skipper, commissioned January that same year, have the inboard berth.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 2, 2017
Messages
37
In general:

Promotions: When he is commissioned as an ensign or second lieutenant (paygrade O-1) on Comm Day, he is assigned a unique lineal number and his date of rank is that day. Lineal number is where he ranks in seniority compared to all other officers in his service. OCS, ROTC, direct commission programs, same. The date of rank (he will have subsequent ones) and lineal number (never changes) are the markers for all subsequent promotions. First two promotions are fog-a-mirror: with sufficient time in grade, acceptable performance and reporting senior's recommendation for promotion to next rank. O-4 (lieutenant commander, major) promotion is a competitive board selection.

Retirement: USNA time does not count for military retirement. It can be factored into Federal/civil service retirement. Example: USNA grad leaves AD, goes to work for HLS as a civilian program analyst, can count USNA years toward Fed retirement. Very rough description.

Most officers have no clue about their lineal number until they are more senior. Some fun stories...Navy ships often tie up to the pier in a nest, with ships tied to each other. Unless operational needs dictate, the senior CO gets the preferred inboard berth, the pierside one. How determined? Lowest lineal number. You could have 3 USNA classmates, all destroyer skippers, all same rank, and their lineal numbers will determine seniority. Goes back to class order of merit. Or you could have an OCS skipper, commissioned January that same year, have the inboard berth.
Thank you so much to everyone for their help and responses. We thought the above was the case, just wanted clarification!
Cheers!
 
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