Running Advic

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by classof2022, Nov 24, 2017.

  1. classof2022

    classof2022 Member

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    Hello.

    I have my LOA and awaiting my formal nomination. I have been prepping up for Beast because I want to be in best shape as possible. Running is most definitely my weakness. I got my LOA through sports and I’m focusing on getting stronger for sports, however, with Beast, it will make me lose a lot of muscle. I want to get stronger but any advice on training for running? I’m nervous about that but have plenty of time to prep.
     
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  2. Artillery

    Artillery Member

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    I'm an xc runner. The biggest thing with running long distance is that you'll end up losing a lot of lean mass if you don't train other muscle groups more often than you run. I lost 15 pounds by the end of XC season after passing my CFA.

    I'd say do runs 2/5 weekdays, do strength the other three days, do both on the weekends (as in, work out and then go for a run). So Monday Wednesday Friday do your strength training whatever you do and then Tuesday and Thursday go for distance runs. On weekends, do strength and then go out for a run (over the summer I tried mini CFAs cuz I was training for it, but I still do it cuz its actually a great way to work out)

    As far as distance runs go, if your focus is just being able to run for a longer distance, first find trails or a place to run that's easy to get to. Start with maybe 25 mins, just do an out and back kinda thing, go out for 13:30 and then turn around and come back the way you came. See how far out you got. At this point there's two things to work on: distance per run and distance per time. For the first run in the week, just benchmark it. Second run, try to get out farther. On the next week, add five minutes to the run. You'll get it eventually. On weekends, do 75% of the run after you do your workout, run how you feel (make it just a tad bit uncomfortable, but not as bad as the weekday runs).

    There's obviously no one size workout because everyone's different, but that's what I do when I'm not focussing on just running cuz I need to build back up the muscle, you don't want the runs to make you lose weight because, while you'll probably lose fat, you're also gonna be losing muscle just because your body thinks its gonna need to lose weight to keep you moving. Hope that works!
     
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  3. another13mom

    another13mom 10-Year Member

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    Once admitted, both of mine ran 4-5 times a week for 4-6 miles and did tons of pushups every day. It's hilly where we are so they were prepared for the hills at West Point. If it's not hilly where you are, run the steps of the closest high school stadium multiple times a few times a week so the hills won't wear you down. The fitter you are for running and pushups, the less tired you'll be during beast, the less likely you'll be drained by the yelling/training/running to wait, the easier it will be to do well.
     
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  4. MidwestDad

    MidwestDad Member

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    Distance not so important - hills are. Overall cardio is critical but you don't need to run more than a few miles at a time. If you are not used to it get a decent pack and hike / jog with weight until you can carry 40 lb uphill without struggling. You don't need to be a distance runner to make it thru beast but you better have outstanding cardio and core in addition to upper body strength.

    You will also be in clunky dress shoes and boots a lot so try some ankle weights to add some weight to your feet - a world of difference vs lightweight running shoes.

    DS never ran more than 2 miles in one shot before beast, he had no troubles physically but was in top overall shape.
     
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  5. another13mom

    another13mom 10-Year Member

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    ^^^ Lots of conflicting advice. Mine is for a kid who wants to do well and not just get by. You'll do an average run of 3-4 miles a day during beast, some days more - on hills. You'll ruck but they work up over the 6 weeks in time, distance and weight. Do not put weights on ankles to train - ever. That is asking for trouble. Do not carry more than 30 lbs - you won't during Beast. You will do push-ups and abs every morning, and run. If you're not a runner, don't limit yourself to 2 miles in one shot (unless you are a true beginner and then work up from 2-4 or 5) - you will be running more. I've had two go through and both were beast cadre. Also the APFT is 2 miles - if you want to train to do well on it, you'll need to run/train w/ more than 2 miles.
     
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  6. onepercenter2021

    onepercenter2021 Member

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    Hills. Hills. And More Hills. It's the hills we heard so much about that killed the kids during the rucks this summer.
     
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  7. usafa2022

    usafa2022 Member

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    You don't really need to run more than three or four times a week to build a pretty solid aerobic base. A split that I like using is lifting Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday/Sunday and running Monday/Wednesday/Friday. Start out with easy runs of 3-4 miles and later on throw in some harder workouts, like 800-1200m repeats on the track or hard 2-3 mile tempos. Distance running will hurt your speed so, assuming that's important for whatever sport you play, you might also want to throw in some sprinting or hills as a finisher for your strength workouts.

    If you want to run and do heavy lower body lifts on the same day, run first and lift after. Lifting stresses your central nervous system, which can lead to injuries if you try to run immediately after.

    Also, eat a ton. Especially carbs and protein. Recovery is essential in running.