Self Harm

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Lancer8, Oct 1, 2017.

  1. Lancer8

    Lancer8 Member

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    I'm a senior now and I did a little self harm in 9th grade on both biceps but nothing big and nothing that caused a lot or really any bleeding when I did it. However, there are enough faint scars on one bicep to tell that that's what happened but they're very faint. My question is, how close do they check you for scaring? If I check yes for that box in the paperwork, am I automatically DQ'd? Anyone have any tips to minimize the scaring as much as possible? Like I said its very faint, they're old, and there's not many of them.
     
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  2. kfnj

    kfnj Member

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    My DS had to report his own scars, the Dr did not “look” for any. He reported the one on his forearm from a surgical repair with hardware after a bad break.
     
  3. Keel-USNA

    Keel-USNA Member

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    They only asked me to see scars that were big and visible, if they are faint and barely there anymore they most likely won't put them down. They are looking for identifying marks that can be easily seen.
     
  4. USMAROTCFamily

    USMAROTCFamily 5-Year Member

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    The self-harm/self-mutilation situation is the bigger issue. While the scars may not be "caught" for your basic DODMERB exam, you will have a commissioning physical that is much more intense and these doctors will see these (and know what these scars are) and then there is going to be a non-disclosure issue. OP, you are probably aware that self-harm is a disqualifying issue, for justifiable reasons in the military. I urge you to be upfront about this.
     
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  5. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    @Lancer8

    I have returned to this thread multiple times, because I care that you have this history, and hope you have gotten help to understand why it happened, what were the triggers and how to coach yourself out of self-harming action. Your health is the primary issue, AND being truthful when asked about it.

    The military is an extraordinarily high stress environment, starting in the training and education phases and peaking in an operational or combat situation, with lives depending on you. Issues that are controlled or dormant in an everyday setting can zoom right back. This is why the DODMERB bar is so high.
     
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