Shoulder Dislocation advice

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Tb637, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. Tb637

    Tb637 5-Year Member

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    Son in 4th of 5 years AFROTC was at PT yesterday and suffered a shoulder dislocation. Was reduced at local ER. Any advice for approaching this in future? I see it is a big source of DQ. He has never had any prior issues at all. Any advice will help.
     
  2. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    A single incident of a shoulder dislocation should not be a problem. Here is the army standard:
    b. Current joint dislocation if unreduced, or history of recurrent dislocations of any major joint such as shoulder (831), hip (835), elbow (832), knee (836), ankle (837), or instability of any major joint (shoulder (718.81), elbow (718.82), hip (718.85), ankle and foot (718.87) or multiple sites (718.89)) does not meet the standard. History of recurrent instability of the knee or shoulder does not meet the standard

    But to be proactive, collect and save as much documentation as you can incase he needs it in the future. When he follows up with a doctor after the shoulder has healed make sure it is documented that the condition has fully resolved with no restrictions. Save that documentation. I will assume that since it was during PT, that his CoC is already aware of the dislocation, so reporting has been completed. But, he may want to follow up with his CoC to see if any documentation needs to be completed.
     
  3. brob

    brob Member

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    I am not a doctor, but I dislocated my shoulder as a young adult. The problem with a shoulder dislocation is that the tissues surrounding that joint will never be quite the same, instability results, and subsequent dislocations are very common. A regimen of physical therapy can help a great deal to increase stability and strength - if this is done, the individual might not have any further problems for a while. The aging process and loss of muscle tone can result in more dislocations in middle or senior years! Surgery might be required down the road at some point.
     
  4. cb7893

    cb7893 5-Year Member

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    @Tb637 , If you haven't done so, search on this forum for shoulder dislocation" or "shoulder subluxation"--they are the same thing. This is a fairly frequent topic among HS athletes.

    I am not a doctor. I dislocated my right shoulder-I'm left dominant--as a 17 year old (reduced at the ER), at 19 (reduced at the ER), and at 21 (dislocated and reduced all at once while water skiing). The final one occurred 6 weeks before headed to Communist Era Eastern Europe for a year. I babied that shoulder like you wouldn't believe for fear of their hospitals. As soon as I arrived back in the US, summer 1979, I got the operation. At that time, some surgeons were still using pins to secure the ball in the socket. Fortunately, my surgeon was using a new technique of somehow rearranging the tendons/muscles to accomplish the same. My physical therapy consisted of at home exercises using nothing more than a door frame. I believe the procedure is still used today, but has probably improved greatly, along with the PT.

    Bottomline. I'm 61 and bear no resemblance to Tony Horton, the PX 90 guy. However, I do a relatively strenuous workout 3/4 times/wk which involves a whole lot push-ups, planks, overhead carries, etc. I have goal of doing 15 unassisted pull-ups at once before I die. (I'm stuck at 9 and am not betting on me). I still try to cut as sharp as possible when I water ski. The shoulder has 100% mobility. My points of failure at whatever I'm doing have absolutely nothing to do with my shoulder or a fear of injuring it.

    Your son's orthopedist can best advise about the severity of his injury and the likelihood of another dislocation. One way or the other, if your son wants to lead any kind of active life inside or outside of the military, surgery should be in the cards and it is nothing to fear.
     
  5. AirsoftRanger

    AirsoftRanger Member

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    Shoulder subluxation are not the same, by the way, subluxation refers to movement but without a complete dislocation...
    Have your ROTC Friendly Physician update your record with "THERE IS NO HILL SACHS DEFORMITY NOTED ON XRAY" (assuming that is true!) and include this very important information on any query into this matter!!!
    Approach surgery with extreme caution and in order to avoid a rendez-vous with Mr. Knife, work diligently to approach a goal of dumb bell lateral raises 25 # for 15 reps!!!!
     
  6. serviceaboveAll

    serviceaboveAll Member

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    @Airsoft- what is “Hill Sachs Deformity”? I ask bc I’m picking up DS surgical records tomorrow. He had a torn labrum & surgery this summer. I don’t recall the Dr mentioning anything like that but curious what this is or what part it plays in shoulder dislocations.
     
  7. THParent

    THParent Member

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    A Hill Sachs Deformity occurs during a dislocation. This is what causes long term "instability of the shoulder" and is typically a DQ, because it increases the odds of another dislocation in the future.
     
  8. AirsoftRanger

    AirsoftRanger Member

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    hill sachs is an old term to describe a divit in the ball of the humerus, which if present, suggests an increased risk for recurrent dislocation. so, if your son needed surgery, even if he had this they might not mention it.
     
  9. Tb637

    Tb637 5-Year Member

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    Thanks everyone with info-he saw MD today and MRI -artho tom-so needless to say surgery looks necessary-can anyone speak to Air Force DQ on this if he makes full recovery? Comission is sched for may 2019
     
  10. THParent

    THParent Member

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    Once a shoulder has been dislocated, no one can tell you what the outlook is.
    They could move ahead with commissioning, or choose to separate. It all depends upon the extent of his recovery and the needs of the Air Force, at that time.
    You would think that they wouldn't spend all that time and money on his education just to cut him loose before his active duty, but it happens.
    I know I probably speak for all of us when I say Good luck!