USNA OR USAFA???

Old Navy BGO

5-Year Member
I like the maverick approach and that’s the type of leadership I’ve felt I’ve always lead by.
I would't necessarily characterize it as "maverick" approach, but there is a historical rationale for the different culture. In the old days of wood ships and steel men, the Naval Officer was sent off to sea with only broad instructions. Communications were scarce, and voyages were long. The Naval Officer had to improvise, adapt to changed circumstances, and exercise independent judgment.

In contrast, the Army was more tightly controlled, and less autonomous. The Air Force culture is passed down from the Army. (And yes, before we start a history debate, there were smaller Army units that operated independently in the West. There are exceptions to every rule, but the general explanation made sense to me).

When I started the journey, Air Force was my first choice, but they wouldn't have me. I went Navy and never looked back. You really can't go wrong with either.
 
View attachment 2195

There you go again. Answering your own question.
You definitely have a point… I have however found it helpful actually writing this out getting my thoughts down on something other than in my head as well as hearing insight from others such as yourself with more experience! It’s just hard to closing a door knowing that that is such a great opportunity as well.
 

Capt MJ

10-Year Member
Go watch “Master and Commander,” with Russell Crowe. The Navy culture descends from that and earlier world-roving sea traditions - operating on the far side of the world, far from direct oversight, having to improvise on the fly, maintaining good order and discipline, knowing when you can joke with your crew, but also keeping a distance that allows for the exercise of authority.

And crank up your surround sound movie speakers (while having a care for auditory health) for the battle scenes and great soundtrack.
 
Go watch “Master and Commander,” with Russell Crowe. The Navy culture descends from that and earlier world-roving sea traditions - operating on the far side of the world, far from direct oversight, having to improvise on the fly, maintaining good order and discipline, knowing when you can joke with your crew, but also keeping a distance that allows for the exercise of authority.

And crank up your surround sound movie speakers (while having a care for auditory health) for the battle scenes and great soundtrack.
Definitely will give that a go!
 

Devil Doc

Teufel Doc
View attachment 2195

There you go again. Answering your own question.
You definitely have a point… I have however found it helpful actually writing this out getting my thoughts down on something other than in my head as well as hearing insight from others such as yourself with more experience! It’s just hard to closing a door knowing that that is such a great opportunity as well.
I’m just adding a little levity to the situation. You sound like a sharp dude. You’ll figure it out.
 

Tex232

Member
Go watch “Master and Commander,” with Russell Crowe. The Navy culture descends from that and earlier world-roving sea traditions - operating on the far side of the world, far from direct oversight, having to improvise on the fly, maintaining good order and discipline, knowing when you can joke with your crew, but also keeping a distance that allows for the exercise of authority.

And crank up your surround sound movie speakers (while having a care for auditory health) for the battle scenes and great soundtrack.
Great movie, and believable too.
 

Jackflerp

Member
USNA provides you with a direct avenue to the Navy or the Marine Corps. At the end of the day, do you want to be an airman, sailor, or Marine?
 

BBQ-Devil

Member
Take this FWIW.

I was at the USAFA Friday and was part of a discussion with admissions where they stated that for the past two years they have had more Pilot slots than qualified cadets to fill those spots. He told another cadet that if you want to fly, do well, and are medically qualified your chances are close to 100% right now. He specifically said that for the class of 2019 they wanted 550 pilots and are commissioning far less.

On a side note the Captain also said that the Sec of the Air Force gave direction to increase the potential pilot pool for the class of 2023 and that fewer medical waivers were given and PPQ candidates were given preference all things being equal. Needs of the Air Force etc etc.

Again this was from a Captain who works in admissions so take it for what it is worth.
 
Take this FWIW.

I was at the USAFA Friday and was part of a discussion with admissions where they stated that for the past two years they have had more Pilot slots than qualified cadets to fill those spots. He told another cadet that if you want to fly, do well, and are medically qualified your chances are close to 100% right now. He specifically said that for the class of 2019 they wanted 550 pilots and are commissioning far less.

On a side note the Captain also said that the Sec of the Air Force gave direction to increase the potential pilot pool for the class of 2023 and that fewer medical waivers were given and PPQ candidates were given preference all things being equal. Needs of the Air Force etc etc.

Again this was from a Captain who works in admissions so take it for what it is worth.
This is great information to have regarding my decision. I will take this into consideration! What else did you learn on Friday that I may not get without visiting?
 

FMHS-79

Parent
View attachment 2195

There you go again. Answering your own question.
You definitely have a point… I have however found it helpful actually writing this out getting my thoughts down on something other than in my head as well as hearing insight from others such as yourself with more experience! It’s just hard to closing a door knowing that that is such a great opportunity as well.
JMPO - don't focus on the door you are closing, but put 100% of your energy in the one that you've selected.

Close your eyes for a moment and put the recommendations you've received from this forum, your friends, and your family out of your mind. Visualize your future ten years from now - you've completed flight training and you are now in your first duty assignment. Where are you? What are you doing?

Not that logical analysis is bad, but don't forget to factor in your heart...
 
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BBQ-Devil

Member
Take this FWIW.

I was at the USAFA Friday and was part of a discussion with admissions where they stated that for the past two years they have had more Pilot slots than qualified cadets to fill those spots. He told another cadet that if you want to fly, do well, and are medically qualified your chances are close to 100% right now. He specifically said that for the class of 2019 they wanted 550 pilots and are commissioning far less.

On a side note the Captain also said that the Sec of the Air Force gave direction to increase the potential pilot pool for the class of 2023 and that fewer medical waivers were given and PPQ candidates were given preference all things being equal. Needs of the Air Force etc etc.

Again this was from a Captain who works in admissions so take it for what it is worth.
This is great information to have regarding my decision. I will take this into consideration! What else did you learn on Friday that I may not get without visiting?
My DS is interested in Cyber Warfare so we spent some time talking with a professor and got a tour of some of the cyber labs. USAFA is investing heavily in this area (as is most of DoD) and we were told, as with pilots, they have more slots than graduates right now.

As far as visiting the campus, it is beautiful if you like the outdoors. It's hard to describe unless you see it. The campus is literally tucked right against the base of the Rocky's. There were single-engine planes buzzing overhead all day and many were towing gliders used in the soaring program. It does have a different feel than Annapolis. Annapolis "felt" more like a college campus (after you get through security) where USAFA felt a little more like a military base. Kind of goes along with the comments from above about "by the book" vs "maverick". It's hard to quantify but that was the feeling I got just walking around.
 

Tex232

Member
fewer medical waivers were given and PPQ candidates were given preference all things being equal. Needs of the Air Force etc etc.
Why would they be giving fewer medical waivers if they need more pilots? Just trying to understand their logic, you would think that if they’re having trouble filling slots then they’d be increasing the number of waivers, not decreasing.
 
Why would they be giving fewer medical waivers if they need more pilots? Just trying to understand their logic, you would think that if they’re having trouble filling slots then they’d be increasing the number of waivers, not decreasing.
I think they were giving out for your waivers so that the incoming class would be comprised mainly of people who are already pilot qualified than us the greater amount of pilots in the long run. Maybe I’m wrong, I do appreciate all of your advice thus far.
 
JMPO - don't focus on the door you are closing, but put 100% of your energy in the one that you've selected.

Close your eyes for a moment and put the recommendations you've received from this forum, your friends, and your family out of your mind. Visualize your future ten years from now - you've completed flight training and you are now in your first duty assignment. Where are you? What are you doing?

Not that logical analysis is bad, but don't forget to factor in your heart...
I honestly think that is just what I needed to hear. I feel my heart pulling me one way and if I look back, I lose out on giving my first choice all I have. Thank you so much.
 

A1Janitor

Member
fewer medical waivers were given and PPQ candidates were given preference all things being equal. Needs of the Air Force etc etc.
Why would they be giving fewer medical waivers if they need more pilots? Just trying to understand their logic, you would think that if they’re having trouble filling slots then they’d be increasing the number of waivers, not decreasing.
For instance ... they wouldn’t give my son a waiver for colorblindness that would allow him into the SA ... because he can’t be a pilot.
 

raimius

10-Year Member
Run a logical analysis.
If you don't get a definite answer (they are both good options), I'd suggest looking at it this way: will you look back and say "If only I had tried that..." to one of those choices? As an 18 year old, I didn't know which choice would be the best, or if I could really achieve my first choice, but I knew I would regret not trying.
 
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