Will 2-star letter of rec help with ROTC waiver?

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by JCHRNCSHNG, May 13, 2019.

  1. JCHRNCSHNG

    JCHRNCSHNG New Member

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    Currently have a waiver pending for history of adjustment disorder. Was diagnosed by the VA after my enlistment, and fought the VA to get it removed. Had to pay back the VA, and was re evaluated and completely cleared. Either way I have a "history of".

    Anyways I recently met a retired Major General and told him my story. He suggested he write a letter or recommendation for me, and I am planning on submitting it when he sends it back to me. Will this help at all? If so how? I know it always looks good to have a letter of rec, but this is a medical waiver issue.

    Any help?
     
  2. Old Navy BGO

    Old Navy BGO 5-Year Member

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    Not necessarily true. First, question is whether there is a condition at all, and whether it is "waiverable?. These are strictly medical determinations, and DODMERB isn't going to care what a 2 star thinks.

    If this is an issue where NROTC can grant a limited number of waivers for an issue, an letter could help ...or it could hurt. Of course the retired 2 Star thinks he's important and can help you, but FOGO's are political animals. and there is always the possiblity that the 2 star stepped on toes and/or pissed someone off along the way, and the recipient could hold the letter against you.
     
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  3. Devil Doc

    Devil Doc Teufel Doc

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    ...and, you say you "recently met a retired Major General and told him my story."

    If this is a recent acquaintance, what could he possibly write of any value or substance concerning your adjustment disorder?
     
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  4. Tex232

    Tex232 Member

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    As others have said, DODMERB probably isn’t going to care what a general has to say. However that isn’t to say he can’t be of help to you. Rather than write you a letter of rec, you might be better off asking if he has some friends (political or military) that could actually intervene on your behalf and force DODMERB to give you a waiver. It will be much harder for them to turn you down if they have a congressman or the like, leaning over their shoulder and putting political pressure on them.
     
  5. Old Navy BGO

    Old Navy BGO 5-Year Member

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    Again, not necessarily true. First, DODMERB only evaluates whether you meet the established medical qualification. This is (usually) an objective criteria, and political influence or pressure shouldn't have any impact. Waivers are granted by the accession source, individual Service Academy , ROTC, OCS, etc., and some conditions are not waiverable. For those conditions that are waiverable, having someone provide "influence" can help, but as noted above, it can be a double edged sword. Also, from the practical perspective, you have to wonder why a person of influence is going to stick their reputation out on the line for someone they don't know.
     
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  6. Impulsive

    Impulsive Member

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    Absolutely correct Old Navy BGO.....To tell someone to have a "friend" put pressure on DoDMERB could really backfire! Unless that MOC or "connection" knows you and your family really well it would be surprising if they stuck their necks out....they probably are not doctors and don't know what medical conditions are in your record. There are conditions that even with divine intervention you cannot be cleared medically.

    Also something to think about.....VA does NOT "diagnose" a disability without evidence, examinations, and YOUR input (YOU have to ask for it). When you say you had "VA remove your diagnosis" but had to pay them back, that tells me if you are being truthful that you must have told them you really didn't have a mental illness, but filed the claim anyway. The only times VA enforces "repayment" is an overpayment mistake (usually for a dependent or a drill pay issue for reservists), or fraud in the compensation claims process. So if you are telling the whole story here, be careful asking for intervention unless you know your VA record is clear otherwise you may end up with an even greater problem. Just so your are aware (which I am sure you are), there are only two ways for VA to ask for repayment. Either for fraud in connection with a claim for compensation 38 CFR 3.851, or overpayment of a benefit, even Renouncement of a Rating does not require repayment, it simply stops future payments and prevents a claimant from re-filing the same claim later (38 CFR 3.106).

    Be careful, if VA issues your new rating and explains removal of the old rating as a result of any form of misconduct in the claims process (the only reason for repayment and severance of rating), any BI conducted for Security Clearance will see it and your integrity will be questioned.
     
  7. Tex232

    Tex232 Member

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    You would be surprised.
     
  8. Impulsive

    Impulsive Member

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    Perhaps you could could enlighten us? My problem and question is not so much the "waiver assistance" as the VA issue. This General or MOC may very well be able to help the OP get their waiver, but there is another issue. If the OP is telling us the whole story (I have no idea, only what the OP says), they still have the credibility and ethical issue of asking for and receiving a VA Disability Rating, then having it "removed" and having to "pay back the VA". If this is the actual facts regarding OP's VA history, that will be in any Background Investigation performed and IF fraud or misrepresentation is involved (I don't have the records so I don't know) there will be a major issue with issuance of a Security Clearance.
     
  9. Tex232

    Tex232 Member

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    What I meant was, in general, there are waivers for almost anything if you look hard enough and/or know the right people.

    Like you I’m not really sure what the details are regarding his VA thing. From the way he wrote it, I was under the impression that he was misdiagnosed and didn’t want it in his record in the first place. But if he is telling the truth and he did pay back the VA then I doubt a security clearance would be an issue.
     
  10. Old Navy BGO

    Old Navy BGO 5-Year Member

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    This is not true, there are some conditions that are simply not waiverable, ever. The Navy, and other branches I presume, take the medical requirements seriously -- many are written in blood. It doesn't matter how bad you want to attend a Service Academy or who you know, if the condition is not waiverable, you aren't going to get in. Further, even if a condition is waiverable, it makes an already competitive admission process even more competitive.
     
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  11. Tex232

    Tex232 Member

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    Hence why I included the word almost. Of course if you’re Hellen Keller, then you won’t be receiving a waiver.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2019
  12. Tbpxece

    Tbpxece Member

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    Well, yeah. She died in 1968.