I'm worried about getting accepted for a scholarship

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Parker Korpak, Sep 3, 2015.

  1. Parker Korpak

    Parker Korpak New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello, it's always been my dream to be a fighter pilot. I have no color blind-ness, however, I wear glasses and have ADHD/ADD, which are two handicaps for me. I have been off the ADHD/ADD meds for a year now though, and I've been performing fine in school without them. I read I can get lasik approved, so the eyesight shouldn't be an issue either.

    I'm mainly interested in the type 7 Air Force ROTC Scholarship. I hope to major in Aeronautical engineering. I live right by UT-Knoxville, which has Air Force rotc so that would be great. However, the average GPA is 3.76 of your junior year. Mine in my junior year was a 3.444. Also, the average ACT score is a 29.6. Last time, and the only time I took it I made a 25, so I plan on retaking it to at least meet the 26 minimum score. I'm just very worried about not being accepted for the scholarship, so my backup is the Navy ROTC program. I found a nice aviation college in Florida that I could go to. Also, my cousin served in the Air Force for around 20 years. He served as a technical and flight sergeant. He also was an air advisor who trained the Afghanistan air force. He gave me the serious talk about the military. The stuff the recruiters won't tell you, that it honestly can be really crappy, and I understand that and if anything, that talk has inspired me to push myself further. Is there any way this could help me get accepted?

    Can I have some input on this please? Thanks.
     
  2. navymomwannabe

    navymomwannabe Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2013
    Messages:
    859
    Likes Received:
    120
    Welcome. First of all, change your user name if that is your real name. You really should be anonymous on a board like this.

    I don't have first hand knowledge of ADD med stuff but I have read here that you need to be off the meds for a year. So you are good there. If your vision is correctable to 20/20 then you should be ok. Unless your eyes were really really bad (-8.0?) I think that would be ok as well.

    I am an NROTC mom so I won't speak to the type 7 AFROTC scholarship but I do know that you need to increase your ACT by more than 1 point. Bare minimums will not get you a scholarship. They are just too competitive nowadays and with AFROTC, it's a 2 + 2 scholarship so not only do you compete to get it, 2 years later, you compete to keep it.

    Having relatives in the military who can tell you what it's really like certainly help you understand what you are getting yourself into, but I'm not sure how that helps YOU get a scholarship. Other than using that as part of your personal statement, I don't think it'll help much.

    Best of luck!
     
    Stevenson likes this.
  3. Stevenson

    Stevenson Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2014
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    7
    I agree with navymom. Also, why are you worried? You can still participate in ROTC without a scholarship. Most commissioned officer in the Air Force are non-scholarship. Also, depending on the year's funding, you can get an in college scholarship your spring semester.

    I'm not too sure about NROTC because I'm currently not in it but I heard you need to earn a scholarship by 2nd year? in order to continue with the program. Someone can correct me.

    Also, have you thought about anything else besides being a fighter pilot? Rated slots are difficult these days. Not saying you can't do it, but I would think if you would be okay with RPA if the Air Force decides that's what you'll do instead.

    As much as GPA goes, you can't bring it up. Make sure your course rigor is up to par from freshman to junior year. Your extracurriculars can also help you. You should also aim high for your PFA. Try to max it out. ACT is best sitting so retake and aim for 29+. Study is key!

    Since you're a tech major, you have an advantage but not a godly advantage.

    Good luck!
     
  4. navymomwannabe

    navymomwannabe Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2013
    Messages:
    859
    Likes Received:
    120
    Yes Stevenson, with NROTC you must be scholarship after 2 years or you can not continue.
     
  5. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,539
    Likes Received:
    1,002
    Well, not quite right on NROTC. By the start of your junior year you must have advanced standing which means being contracted. You may or may not have a scholarship. If you have advanced standing you get the monthly stipend but receive no funds for tuition.
     
  6. navymomwannabe

    navymomwannabe Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2013
    Messages:
    859
    Likes Received:
    120
    Thanks Kinnem!
     
    kinnem likes this.
  7. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,797
    Likes Received:
    931
    You have 0% chance if you do not apply.

    Now let me make a clarification about the 2+2. You do not compete for the scholarship 2x. You are guaranteed the scholarship for the 1st 2 years. As a sophomore every cadet will compete for summer field training. The board does not know if the candidate is on scholarship or not, and does not take this factor into account when selecting the cadets. Now if not selected they can choose to disenroll the cadet, thus the loss of the scholarship. If selected than you keep the scholarship/

    Please remember that the AFROTC scholarship is not like the NROTC system where the cadet is tied to the school. Let's say you get a type 7, and decide to go OOS or a private. If the school charges you tuition equal or less than your IS school you can still use it. If not than you can ask for it to be changed to a 3 year type 2. You would contract as a sophomore though.

    Secondly, this is a national board. If they have 900 scholarships, they are not going to say that every state will give out 18 scholarships. IF the top 900 recipients are from California, than so be it.

    Finally, on a whole, your ACT really needs to jump about 3 points to feel comfortable for either the AFROTC or NROTC scholarship impo. You state your composite is 25, but if you read the fine print it is not just the composite minimum, it is the E portion that must be at least 25 too. Thus, if you get a composite 26, with a 28 M, and Science, but a 24 E than you might never make it to even the boarding stage.
    ~ The selection is not just about your ACT, and that is why it is the median. It is about the Whole Candidate. There will be candidates with a 26, but also be the valedictorian and the Captain of 3 sports, plus a great interview score.

    The scholarship selection rate historically has been about 16-18% of those boarded. Nobody here sits on the boards, and if they did they would not tell you, but they would say that there are more cadets/mids not on scholarship than there are on scholarship in the beginning.

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2015
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,797
    Likes Received:
    931
    Forgot to say I never place weight into my cgpa is this or that. There is a reason why I don't. AFROTC will look at your school profile too. They have their own algorithm that they use for the gpa portion. At your school they may use a 7 point scale, and at another candidates school they may use a 10 point scale. An 84 on a 10 point would be a solid B or a 3.4, but at the 7 point school, that is a C, and now their under a 3.2. To make numbers even more insane, than you might have a candidate where the school does the pure 84 X 4.0. That candidate would now have a 3.36

    As you can see, I have 3 kids all with an 84 in a class, and 3 different cgpas. This is also before we start the whole weighted process. Some schools do not weight honors. Some schools have APs weighted at 4.5, 5.0 or 6.0.

    It does not stop there either for the PAR (Prior Academic Record). In your transcript will be the school profile.
    ~It will tell them how many students take AP/IBs. So now when they look at your curriculum and you have 10 APs, but most have 4 this gives you an edge because it says to them you are taking the most rigorous course load and it explains why your cgpa maybe lower.
    ~ It will also tell them the % that go Ivy, 4 yr Public/Private, 2 yr CC or trade and straight to the work force. If you are ranked top 25% with a 3.44 and 35% go to Ivy, it says your school does not give out easy As. Now take that other candidate with the same cgpa, but only 10% go Ivy, and they are ranked top 20%, it says that the school and grading may not be as strenuous as the other candidate.

    There are over 2000 HS in this nation, and since the scholarship process is national, they have to level the playing field to their standard bar. The ACT/SAT is national, so that is not a problem. The gpa and course rigor as I have stated is harder to assess which is why they want to see your school profile. It is why older posters like me will never address it in a chance me thread.
     
  9. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,797
    Likes Received:
    931
    Parker,

    If this is your dream, than start asking the folks for flight school hours as birthday and Xmas/Hannukah presents. It will be a factor when you become a junior in college. It is part of the selection process.

    I also want to say that it is good to have this dream, but realistically a very small percentage will sit inside a fighter cockpit, but all of them will owe a decade of their life when they earn those pilot wings, be it a C17 or B52 or F35. Be prepared to be in that B or C group and not in the F. My DS is a pilot. He is a C130J pilot. His Dad was an F15E WSO. Out of the 21 or 24 winged (can't remember the number now). 1 student got a 22. 1 got a 15E. Everyone else got airframes that started with the letter B, C or E.
    ~ This is not uncommon. It typically is a 10-15%
    ~~~ This is winging. Now add in that @15% will wash out of IFT and never go to UPT. At UPT @25% will wash out. So the true number is much less. Probably closer to 6-9% that start from IFT and wing out of UPT with a fighter.

    Just saying keep the goal, but be happy with whatever you get.

    Thank your cousin for serving this great nation. However, the world he lived in and what you aspire to are two different worlds. I am assuming you meant he was a tech sergeant working on the flight line or maintenance. There is no such thing as a flight sergeant. If you want to read a real true blue insight into what IFT and UPT is like, search this forum for raimius. His signature line has a blog tag line. The first part is about USAFA life, but later on he goes onto the daily life of IFT (aka IFS) and UPT.
    ~ Being a pilot is not just academics, i.e engineering, but handling the stick too.
    ~~ My DS was an AFROTC scholarship cadet and majored in Govt and Politics. As I stated he is a pilot of a C130J. Fencers DS is with him in Dyess flying the same airframe. Her DS was a STEM major out of USAFA. My point is at UPT they don't give a crap what your commissioning source was or your major when you are in the program. The slate is wiped clean the minute you commission.

    Finally, ask yourself before you go any further....IF I can't be a pilot which branch would I rather serve in for 4 years at least after college? Will you be happier on a boat or at Oh My God No Alamogordo as an Intel officer? You can choose where to go to college and what to major in. It is 30 weeks out of your life every year for 4 yrs., with the weekends off. AF and Navy will make you go AD, and they choose what you will do and where you will live 24/7/365 for 4 years (non-rated). Rated and for the AF you will be @33 before you can say buh-bye!
    ~ I don't think my DS ever wanted to live in Del Rio aka Hell Rio Texas, nor Abilene, but that is his life. He showed up at Laughlin Sept 30th 2012. Besides the 6 months at Little Rock for C130J school, he will live in TX until 2019 or 7 years. Two bases in the middle of nowhere Texas. He will be able to walk in 2023. He wanted Ramstein, they said TX!
     
  10. Parker Korpak

    Parker Korpak New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've read getting flight school hours outside of the military doesn't help your chances at all. I have gotten a introductory lesson, and I am familiar with aircraft controls and characteristics.

    Anyways, in reply to all. I sound very worried about not making it for either now. There was all this information I didn't know about. I did my research, I spoke to recruiters, and they all mentioned none of this. I know I have to score higher than a 26 for the air force. I do plan to re-take it and I am taking it a lot more seriously now. I don't necessarily feel discouraged from having a career in the military, but I just feel worried about getting accepted for the scholarship.

    Now my questions are:
    I'm a bit confused as to what I do to apply to both the Air Force and Navy for the scholarship. Is that possible, because I thought you had to sign a commitment agreement, or is that only if you're accepted?
    And for both, I compete to keep the scholarship, right? How much do I have to compete, or do I just have to stay about the minimum GPA? I aim for the type 7 scholarship for the air force since UT Knoxville's tuition is under $9,000.

    And if I don't get accepted, what branch would give me a better chance of becoming a pilot?

    Thank you so much to all. I have been trying to get in shape for the PFA, based off the air force Physical Fitness Test minimum scores. I am able to do about 30 90 degrees pushups, and I run a mile and a half in 12 minutes. My mile time itself is about 7, so if I just keep on pushing myself further I should be able to get the mile and a half time down. I know these aren't necessarily things to be proud of, but yeah, I'm getting myself in shape and have been for the past few months. I also have never done a sport, and would community service help me at all? Thank you.
     
  11. chud182

    chud182 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2014
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    2
    There is absolutely no problem in applying to multiple branches for ROTC. Apply to all 3 to keep your options open.
     
  12. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,539
    Likes Received:
    1,002
    First, and I don't say this to be mean, but you are right to be worried about winning a scholarship. I would say that for any random applicant the most likely outcome is to NOT receive a scholarship. This isn't to say that you won't. All you can do though is to do your best, put the best application together that you can, hope for the best and prepare for the worst. Have backup plans if you don't receive the scholarship.

    Now to your questions. AFROTC and NROTC scholarships are SEPARATE applications. Links to the applications can be found on their web sites. AFROTC ignores anything you do in your senior year (or maybe that's USAFA, not sure). NROTC considers your grades and activities from senior year. Yes, you can apply for both scholarships. You can even accept one and if an offer comes in from the other at a later date, you can do that program if you want.

    AFROTC, you compete to get an SFT slot after your second year. If you do not receive a Summer Field Training slot, then generally speaking you are out of the program. For NROTC, once you have the scholarship you keep it unless you screw up. For example a Marine option has to successfully complete OCS after their junior year to stay in the program. I suppose that's a type of competition. Navy options really need to have a successful 1/C summer cruise. For NROTC, if you don't have a scholarship then you'll need to achieve "Advanced standing" by the end of your sophomore year to stay in the program.

    In either program, you are always competing, whether it be for a scholarship, advanced standing, or just placement on the Order of Merit List. Achieving the minimum GPAs in any case will just not cut it. For example, the NROTC GPA minimum is 2.5. However, my son's unit expected midshipmen to maintain a 3.0 average, and in some cases a 3.5 average. If that is not achieved you are placed on mandatory study hours, where someone is looking over your shoulders a couple hours a day to ensure you're studying.

    Your chances of becoming a pilot are essentially the same whether you receive a scholarship or not. Neither program cares if you have a scholarship when handing out pilot slots, or for anything else either.

    The things that would make you look better for ANY college are the things you should be doing to improve your chances for a scholarship. You still have time to improve grades and SAT scores. You still have time to fit in a sport for NROTC and also other ECs and Service hours.

    Hope this is helpful. Good luck. Work hard. Do your absolute best.
     

    Attached Files:

    nofodad likes this.
  13. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,797
    Likes Received:
    931
    Whoever told you that knows absolutely ZERO about the rated selection process! If we still had the emocon of the BS flag I would have used it.

    1. If you have a Private Pilot License (PPL) you get to waive IFT. The precursor for UPT. IOWS, PPL and you go straight to UPT if selected for pilot.
    2. Cadets meet a rated board and part of the score is the PCSM (Pilot Candidate Selection Method) is how many hours you have. You get bonus points added to your score. You bring your flight log to the TBAS and they submit it. Those hours can mean the difference between UPT and UNT.
    3. TBAS (Test of Basic Aviation Skill).
    ~ AFROTC cadets as C3Cs will take the TBAS exam prior to meeting the board. Having flight hours can help you more than you know.
    4. AFOQT is used for SFT selection. It is broken down into different categories, but 2 of the categories are Pilot and Nav. Having flight hours can help on this exam too.

    Finally, here is something to read.
    OVERVIEW
    The Test of Basic Aviation Skills (TBAS) is a computerized psychomotor, spatial ability, and multi-tasking test battery. It is used as a tool for the selection of United States Air Force pilot and RPA pilot candidates. TBAS scores are combined with the candidate's Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) Pilot composite and flying hours to produce a Pilot Candidate Selection Method (PCSM) score. The PCSM score provides a measure of a candidate's aptitude for pilot and RPA pilot training. This PCSM score is provided to pilot selection board along with other "whole-person concept" information to make decisions concerning pilot candidate selection.

    I am not trying to be antagonistic, I am saying anyone that is rated now will say flight hours matter. It gives you an edge for the TBAS and the AFOQT, It can give you an edge later on when you are a student handling cross winds on a check ride at UPT.

    It was probably the best money we ever spent for our DS. Our deal was he paid for 1 flight, we paid for the next.
    ~ This was a kid until 17 that wanted to go JAG AF. He was bit by the bug, and we were like...oh crap, he is killing us financially. We were basically paying for an hour of flight time every other week! However, I have a picture of him flying over our home the day he solo'd the Saturday before he started his senior year in HS. He did the traditional AF thing, tipped his wings to say HEY it's me!

    Flight hours are very expensive. 150-200 bucks an hour. I get it if you can't afford it. Like I said, our DS had to step up to the plate too. His entire paychecks went to flying. One xmas all he got was a hoodie because the other present was flight hours. For his Bday all he got was flight hours. Not everybody can afford to do it, but even the minimal amount of time over the next few years will matter. you will not meet the rated board until you are a junior or one year prior to graduation. (Engineer 5 yr program).

    I am not trying to be mean, rude, unkind, etc. I am just stating the true facts. PPL is part of the selection when it comes to AF for rated.
     
  14. FalconsRock

    FalconsRock Parent

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2015
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    537
    Aeronautical engineering is a Type 2 (technical major) AFROTC scholarship (someone can correct me if I'm wrong) and has a higher degree of award than type 7 provided you meet all criteria regarding grades, test scores etc. Chances of getting this type of scholarship are greater than type 7.

    What type of recruiters are you talking to, enlisted or officer recruiters? There is a big difference and if you want to be a pilot, you should be talking to officer recruiters.
     
  15. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,797
    Likes Received:
    931
    Now on to your other questions.

    For AFROTC the min. cgpa is 2.5 to keep the scholarship. However, now we go back to SFT selection. Getting an SFT slot with anything under 3.0 as a TECH (STEM major) is basically putting you at the bottom of the barrel.
    ~ The Avg cgpa is 3.0/3.1 for Tech. 3.3/3.4 non-tech. Plus, they use the AFOQT scores. AFOQT is like the ACT.

    The minimum for AFROTC basically will mean you are in jeopardy for SFT.

    You are young. Please read raimius's blog. I think you have yet to get there is a difference between getting a pilot slot and earning pilot wings. Let's say you have a 85% chance in the AF, but only 25% wing, yet the Navy has a 25% chance and 85% wing.
    ~ That is the thing when you ask for chances.

    I would also say again...look at being a pilot and your lifestyle in the AF vs Navy. They have different missions and that includes the airframe too.

    One last thing.
    OUCH! You need to get that down! I won't swear, but I believe that is a bust unless you are female. I believe pass is @ 11:30 for 1 1/2 miles. My DS is not a runner, but he still does it @10:15. If you can run a 7 min mile, than you should be able to run 11 min 1 1/2 mile. 12 is closer to an 8 min. mile.
    ~ My DS was a PT instructor in AFROTC. They had two cadets that were in charge of the run. One was in the front for the pace. One in the back (my DS) that kept time and screamed at the cadets. The back of their uniform had their last name and he would call it out loud enough for the unit to hear their name if they were close to busting the time.

    Candidates do not place enough emphasis in my mind that the 1st week of PT is also a 1st impression week. ROTC PT will be in spitting rain, 90% humidity, 30 degrees, etc. at 6 a.m. They don't care if you were up until 2 finishing a paper or studying for an exam.
    ~ No excuses accepted. Like the old Nike slogan...Just DO IT!

    This is the life you will be joining. This will be their expectations.

    Some people think ROTC is just show up for LLAB and PT, a couple hours of the week, and you will commission. Like it is a given. Posters here will say otherwise, They will tell you that by the time you commission ROTC can be 20 hours on top of academics every week.

    Pilots will tell you that college was easy. They will tell you that for a year+ they were told they sucked! That from noon on Sunday to 4 p.m. Friday it was all books and chair flying (while eating dinner). Their life was eat, breathe, study, fly 16-18 hours a day, repeat 6 days a week for 54 weeks. (AF).
     
  16. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,797
    Likes Received:
    931
    WRONG!

    That is not how AFROTC works.

    Type 2 means they will pay up to 18K per year for tuition. It is not a tier aspect like NROTC. You could be a Govt and Political Science major like my DS and get a type 2.
    ~ However the odds are way against you as a non-tech major. 15% of all scholarships are typically a type 2 or @135. Out of that only 10-15% of those 135 will be non-tech.

    Type 7 is the bulk of all scholarships. @80% will be type 7. This is also where any non-tech has a good shot.

    Quick overview
    Type 1: 5% of all scholarships awarded. Tech majors get 95% of these scholarships. In real numbers...45 nationally. Non-tech 2 or 3.
    ~ Pays total tuition regardless of the cost. Tuition 50K ...okey dokey.

    Type 2: 10-15% of all scholarships. Again you are looking at 90-95% awarded to tech. 135 at tops. Non-tech maybe 30 are non-tech.
    ~They will pay up to 18K tuition, if the tuition is over 18K than the cadet can use scholarships or pay out of pocket for the difference. Tuition 50K, than that the 32K is on you, but you can use the scholarship!

    Type 7: The bulk of all scholarships. Still 75%+ go Tech.
    ~ They will pay only up to the cost of the IS college. You cannot say my kid is attending OOS and I will pay the difference. It is flat out IS costs, and nothing else. Now if that private or OOS college says we will charge IS than you can use it.
    ~~ TAMU is a great example. If you get a 1K scholarship, than they will charge you IS tuition. You can live in VA, and be OOS for TAMU, but they will charge you IS and you can now use the type 7 for all 4 years. Now if another candidate decides to go to VT and is from Texas, they are SOL because VT will charge them as an OOS.
    ~~~ That means they must convert their 4 yr type 7 to a 3 yr type 2. They will pay OOS for their 1st year. Sophomore year they will contract.

    NROTC and AROTC is totally different than AFROTC. I think you are thinking NROTC tier. AFROTC is simple you are tech or non-tech. Engineering is tech. The OP is good on that chance me aspect.

    I am not trying to be mean, rude or unkind. I am just trying to make sure that kids applying as a tech major understands that AFROTC is not a tier major aspect, and that AFROTC does not tie the recipient to a school like NROTC.
    ~ The thing they do have in common is this...decide next year to quit that STEM major and become an accounting major, chances are your scholarship will be revoked.

    Think before you say I am going engineering and the only way to pay for that dream school is the ROTC scholarship.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2015
  17. FalconsRock

    FalconsRock Parent

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2015
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    537
    Well, Pima, you ought to know, but I am still confused. My DD is also applying for AFROTC and the website is not clear on what you just wrote. It does list the types of all the majors and such and describes which ones are considered technical. The other category is "all others". My DD is going pre-med but may major in physics (technical) or biology (non-tech). So, are you saying that she can compete for a type 1 scholarship (I know chances are low compared to engineering)? I thought she was only eligible for a type 7 scholarship. So, can you please explain in terms that one who is not in the know can understand. I am just not getting it today:scratch:
     
  18. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,797
    Likes Received:
    931
    She will compete for type 1, 2 or 7 regardless of her intended major. THEY will decide if she gets a type 1, 2 or 7. She tells them her intended major on that pull down tab. Every candidate is eligible for every type. It is just statistically the chances change. See above.
    ~ It is not like NROTC and tiers. ....govt majors can only get a type 7 because they are not tech/stem is not true. What is true is they better be that superstar as a non-tech...ACT needs to be in the mid 30s best sitting, top of the class, lots of APs, ECs.

    However, IE: if she goes tech (physics), that will give her better odds of getting any of the scholarships, since probably 80-85% of all scholarships go tech.

    Let's assume they give her a tech type 2 for Physics, and after the 1st semester she decides she wants to go BIO, she than must get approval from HQ AFROTC. to switch to now a non-tech major. Highly doubtful that will occur. If they say no, than she is between a rock and a hard place. Keep that 18K tuition in a major she hates, or give it up and go non-tech which now can be a player in SFT since she does not intend to go rated.

    Here is my take on the whole ROTC scholarship aspect. Chances are you will find out about merit scholarships from your colleges around the same time as the board results for AFROTC. DS go picked up on the 1st board, around xmas.

    Don't wrap yourself up in this aspect. DS commissioned with 28 other cadets. 110 cadets started with him as a freshmen. His unit was voted 2X in 5 years the best large AFROTC det. in the nation.
    ~ They had 100% go rated that requested it. 13 out of 13. The Cadet Wing Commander was not scholarship. He was also the only one to get ENJJPT.

    I will say that statistically those on scholarship commissioned at a higher rate, but I don't know if that was desire or need to pay for college.

    The point is the slate is wiped clean the minute they step on campus. Nobody talks about the scholarship. They typically only know in my opinion because every college kid struggles with their piggy bank. ROTC scholarship kids can't wait until the 1st and the 15th. They are the ones that all of sudden are going to Chipotle or Pot Belly's for lunch that day instead of eating ramen! But the CoC couldn't care at all about that when they rank the cadets/mids.

    I am not going to sugar coat or lie to you. Pre med non-tech (Bio), non-rated is not easy when you look at SFT selection. Last year (FY14) the rate was 58% overall. 17% non-tech/non-rated were selected.
    ~ Going Physics can also be a problem. she would be tech/non-rated, and have a higher chance. However, they can turn to her as a senior and say...we will not give you Educational Delay for Med school. You will go AD as... upon commissioning.

    She needs to be honest to herself and answer this one question.
    Is she ready to say: Service before self?

    If this is about I want to serve in XYZ capacity, that is great, but is she willing to serve as ABC? Is she willing to go Physics and be sent to Minot as a Missileer? Is she willing to be sent to Eilson (Fairbanks AK) as a Public Affairs officer?

    It is great to have those dreams, but if you do not accept that service before self is not a cliche and more of a reality you can be in for a very bad wake up call that will last @5 years after commissioning on a good day.
    ~ Most AFROTC grads will wait 6-9 months after commissioning before reporting. The clock does not start ticking until they report.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2015
  19. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,539
    Likes Received:
    1,002
    I think some folks are inadvertently talking past one another. For AFROTC there are TIER 1, 2, and 3 MAJORS. There are also 3 different TYPES of scholarships, type 1 (full tuition), type 2 (pays tuition up to 18,000), and type 3 (pays in-state rate tuition for YOUR state). Types have nothing to do with tiers. Anyone who applies for an AFROTC scholarship with ANY declared tier major is in competition for any TYPE of scholarship. So a tier 3 major CAN win a type 1 scholarship. 85% of scholarships will be awarded to TIER 1 and 2 majors.

    Hope this helps everybody.

    EDIT: Cross posted with Pima
     
  20. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,797
    Likes Received:
    931
    kinnem there is no tier 1,2 and 3 for AFROTC majors. You are either TECH or NON TECH.

    There are 3 types of scholarships which you are correct about. 1, 2 and 7.

    Again, there is no tier 3 major like NROTC. It is tech or nontech. That are your 2 options.
    ~ It does get a little insane for some majors, especially IT. Some IT majors are Tech, some are non-tech. It can also be an issue for students like my DS2. He is Bio Chem. He is not AFROTC, but HQ AFROTC might say he is Bio, non-tech or Chem a tech major all because he is Bio Chem.

    You are correct though ...an underwater basket weaving major can get a type 1, and at the same time an aerospace engineering major can get a type 7. It all comes down those 3 little letters...WCS!

    WCS= Whole Candidate Score.

    I am going to say it again. 16-18% of all candidates boarded will get a scholarship. @900 in total.
    Type 1 in numbers is 45 in the nation.
    ~ Yes, you read that right. 45.
    ~ Maybe 2 or 3 non-tech majors will get a type 1...OUCH!
    Type 2 in numbers is around 135 in the nation.
    ~ Maybe 6 -9 nationally will get it as a non-tech major.
    Type 7 will have @700
    ~ 75% of them will be tech.

    I am not trying to be mean. I am just saying, plan to commission without a scholarship. That is the norm.

    You can commission with or without a scholarship. Look at Gen. Colin Powell.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2015

Share This Page