Serve concurrently?

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by ktnatalk, Apr 30, 2016.

  1. ktnatalk

    ktnatalk Sailor. Shipmate. Parent.

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2016
    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    383
  2. goforspaatz

    goforspaatz USAFA c/o 2020

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2015
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    209
  3. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    2,445
    When Joe Cardona was drafted last year the USN agreed to let him play and then he worked at NAPS. Tuesday was his off day in the NFL so he worked a full day there and then worked a few hours each day around his football schedule. Once the season ended he headed to his ship. If I remember correctly the USN has not made a determination beyond last season for Joe. I could be wrong in that.

    The USN could do something similiar with Keenan. First, Keenan has to make the team. Joe was a long snapper and played in every game. Keenan isn't as much a lock as Joe was to make the active squad. My guess is he could and if not, I suspect he would definitely make practice roster while he learned to be a WR. Keenan service selected Info Warfare or Professional (can't remember which one). He could do something like Joe with working at USNA in his 'off time' or at FT Meade which would be a natural location for his service selection. Be interesting to see what happens.

    I believe the Army has approved a female basketball player to play in the WNBA this year. Much easier as that is a short season and she could serve for the other 8-9 months of the year.
     
  4. ktnatalk

    ktnatalk Sailor. Shipmate. Parent.

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2016
    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    383
    He selected Information Warfare, which has since renamed Cryptologic Warfare. It will be indeed interesting to see as his story develops.
     
  5. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    2,445
    Wait they rwent back to the original name? Crypto was the original name. IW is the newer name.
     
  6. ktnatalk

    ktnatalk Sailor. Shipmate. Parent.

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2016
    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    383
  7. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    2,445
    Oh I know. I am old enough to have worked with cryppies and have friends who were cryppies before they changed it all.
     
  8. ktnatalk

    ktnatalk Sailor. Shipmate. Parent.

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2016
    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    383
    Personally, I rather see Reynolds flourishes full time in NFL than part-timing as a cryppie or anything else in the Navy. He also draws too much attention everywhere he goes, which is not his fault.
     
  9. murfthesurf

    murfthesurf DS - USNA 2020

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2015
    Messages:
    566
    Likes Received:
    615
    Navy secretary approves Keenan Reynolds to play in NFL this season


    Ray Mabus says Reynolds can fulfil his military obligations in the Naval Reserve Force, meaning he can play full-time for the Ravens this season

    Keenan Reynolds has been given the all-clear to play for the Ravens this season after Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus gave him his blessing.
    Reynolds, who set numerous NCAA records at the US Naval Academy, was picked in the sixth round of the NFL draft by the Baltimore Ravens, but had been waiting for permission from the Navy to join the team. Upon graduation, all athletes from the Navy, Army and Air Force academies are required to complete active duty.

    But Mabus told The Dan Patrick Show on Friday that Reynolds can fulfill his military obligations in the Naval Reserve Force, therefore freeing him up to play full-time for the Ravens this season.

    Mabus had already told Reynolds, Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti and coach John Harbaugh.

    Mabus had previously told Patrick that he was “confident” Reynolds would be able to play in the NFL while honoring his service commitment.

    “Keenan Reynolds is one of the finest people that I know,” Mabus said. “He is just a sterling individual. If I’m an NFL coach or GM, he’s the kind of person I want in my locker room.”

    Reynolds went 32-13 in his four years at Navy and set a records in the NCAA for rushing touchdowns (88), rushing yards by a quarterback (4,559), and points scored (530). He is in the middle of transitioning from quarterback to wide receiver and as OTAs and minicamp begin, he will compete with Breshad Perriman, Marlon Brown and Chris Moore for playing time.
     
  10. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    2,445
    Other articles also state that Joe Cordova was also submitted.
     
  11. brovol

    brovol Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Messages:
    836
    Likes Received:
    556
    Is it just me, or are others bothered by this? I am a huge sports fan, but to make exceptions for athletes suggests that playing professional sports is more important than the mission of our armed forces. Would the services do this for a less talented and unknown athlete who wanted to play minor league baseball? Or, a talented musician who had a chance to play with the Vienna Philharmonic?

    I think it reaffirms the message that media has sent for decades; fame and athletics are more important than education, economy, and even national defense. And athletes should be awarded special entitlement.

    It used to be that the services, and the academies in particular, were mostly beyond this, and I am disappointed to see that, like some other things, they are trending in a less traditional direction. We have as a nation become too beholden to popular opinion.

    ....but I digress. I will get off my soap box now.
     
    goforspaatz and 16maybt like this.
  12. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,358
    Likes Received:
    1,820
    The Navy has been very stingy over the years with who it has allowed to do this, going straight Reserve instead of AD to fulfill service obligation.

    Big Navy will use Keenan as a recruiting tool, and is willing to flex on the AD. Keenan is also a well-respected, personable, smart guy, so Navy is happy to let him go down this path, knowing they will get their pound of flesh in other ways. Others have been allowed to go to Olympic camps, trials and the Games themselves, assigning them to nearby Navy or Marine commands or recruiting stations. If Keenan makes it past all the cuts and makes the Ravens team, the Naval Academy and Navy will get brought up by every color commentator - priceless brand advertising on a national scale for years to come.

    There have been a handful of other athletes who also made the NFL cut but were not considered to be exceptional enough to merit the Reserve deal and spokesperson/recruiting role. I recall one football player who was ordered to report to his ship and commence his career as a SWO, but who deliberately chose to underperform and have conduct issues. Navy held him accountable, eventually separated him and recouped the six-figure cost of his education, which he paid for from his NFL money. His name is seldom mentioned in a positive way. Big Navy is gambling on Keenan succeeding in both NFL and Reserve career, delivering years of brand marketing, and potentially making major donations over the years - perhaps funding USNA Foundation Scholarships or some other need not covered by Govt appropriated funds.

    Rightly or wrongly, the Navy will capitalize on the country's love of sports and a good story to advance and burnish its brand, as a marketing strategy they are willing to pay for with trading active duty for Reserve duty. These cases are carefully scrutinized internally, in terms of precedent and exceptional nature.

    David Robinson served two years of active duty, then a Reserve period, and continues to be a hugely respected role model and benefactor of USNA, delivering positive marketing for the Navy year after year simply by being himself. Roger Staubach followed a similar path, and he continues to play a huge role at USNA and the Navy. There are handful of other names, small in the face of 1100+ who graduate each year.

    Exceptional grads are allowed to go other paths, if it can benefit the Navy or Marine Corps both short and long-term. The same is true for other Services. Pragmatic, self-serving -yes - but useful in a utilitarian way over the long haul.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2016
    EOD/SEALmom, SDMom2019 and ktnatalk like this.
  13. brovol

    brovol Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Messages:
    836
    Likes Received:
    556
    I understand the argument, Capt, but all due respect, I don't necessarily agree that the advertisement and PR trumps the principle. Likely I am in the minority on this, but the commitment and sacrifice which accompanies that commitment to serve, in the traditional manner, is something that all cadets and midshipmen of service academies share, and distinguishes them from all others. It's part of their patriotic bond. Indeed, it is mentioned by television commentators during every SA game broadcast.

    I think treating some SA graduates more special than others, and allowing them out of their commitment to pursue football of all things (as opposed to cancer research for example), waters down that bond, and compromises the significance of the commitment.

    Would the Catholic Church alow one or two priests out of their vows of celibacy if it helped promote the church? (Please, no alter boy jokes. Lol).

    Perhaps I am making too big a deal out of this, but I think the commitment should be just that; a commitment.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2016
    goforspaatz likes this.
  14. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,358
    Likes Received:
    1,820
    Roger all. I laid out the whys as I understand the Navy strategy to be, in terms of how the commitment is framed. I have always had my own reservations, but since I don't sit behind the big mahogany desk on the E-Ring, figured bigger heads than mine were paid to make those decisions. I will watch his career with interest.
     
  15. brovol

    brovol Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2015
    Messages:
    836
    Likes Received:
    556
    Dang, now we have to find something else to discuss Capt.
     
    Capt MJ likes this.
  16. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2007
    Messages:
    8,755
    Likes Received:
    1,004
    I think it rubs a number of people the wrong way. As far as I can tell, USNA and Navy seem to be the only ones in recent history to do this (I could be wrong?)
     
  17. parentalunit2

    parentalunit2 Parent

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    Messages:
    278
    Likes Received:
    162
    brovol, +1 and don't even get me started on this topic. :mad:
     
  18. ktnatalk

    ktnatalk Sailor. Shipmate. Parent.

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2016
    Messages:
    461
    Likes Received:
    383
    Agree with all y'all. However, I say it again:

     
  19. bookreader

    bookreader Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2015
    Messages:
    397
    Likes Received:
    162
    I'm shaking my head over here with you @brovol . @Capt MJ - thanks for your explanation. As a non-sports person, I am mystified by the pull that sports has over people but your explanation was helpful.
     
    goforspaatz likes this.
  20. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    2,445
    I am honestly torn on this. It goes in waves at all the SAs. USAFA tended to be the most lenient in previous decades. Not sure the situation has popped up in recent years. I read the other day that Kelsey Monato from USMA was going to be authorized to play in the WNBA if she made the squad. Looks doubtful she will. Be curious to see how each service deals with this. As an athlete I think it's great. The other side of me thinks... They need to serve. I understand the strengths of the argument to let them play and the strengths for the opposite to make them serve. I seem to flip flop on my opinion on this one.
     
    Capt MJ likes this.

Share This Page