usma 2014 questions for upcoming west pointers

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by Luke45Eagle, Apr 7, 2014.

  1. Luke45Eagle

    Luke45Eagle New Member

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    I have not yet accepted West Point's offer of appointment. What would happen if I accepted it, and the April 15th deadline passed, then I decided not to go? weighing out all my options, and I just want to know what would be the consequences for doing this? Thanks
     
  2. USMA2017

    USMA2017 New Member

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    You would screw kids who actually want to go out of an appointment. If there is even a shadow of a doubt, don't go.
     
  3. BigNick

    BigNick Member

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    Man-up. Get a gripe! If you have doubts make way for someone who wants to go.
     
  4. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    Practically, not much. I don't know when you have to put a deposit down, but you might lose the deposit. I am assuming if you decided go with this option, you will also put a deposit down with another college. I doubt West Point admissions office will go after you by contacting the other school to get them to withdraw their offer, but never know.

    If I may, you are becoming an adult now many things can't be fixed by your parents or your apologizes anymore. As a kid, when you get into a fight a suspension or yours parents picking you up worked, but as an adult you might get arrested. If you smoke pot and get caught now, your might get grounded or lose your privileges, at West Point likely expulsion. If you end up working for a company that does drug testing, you are going to get fired. Yes, I have heard many "I won't do that when I am older." Well, you have reached that point.

    You are about to start a phase of your life. If you think you got it figured out (i.e. I am not sure about West Point, I accepted my appointment, and if I change my mind before R-day, I just won't go), my answer is not likely.

    There is something called karma also.
     
  5. BoLwife

    BoLwife Member

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    A very practical answer to your question: probably not much. And you likely won't screw anyone else out of a slot because, as long as you don't take too long in deciding (although it seems you should have done a lot of thinking about it already) they will give it to another candidate -- they are giving out appointments almost all the way to R-day. And unlike other schools, WP doesn't actually require you to pay any kind of deposit right away.

    If you weren't waiting, like so many other candidates have been, with baited breath for notice of your appointment to come in the mail, it may not be the best choice for you. Do you have some people you trust who can help talk you through the decision?
     
  6. BoLwife

    BoLwife Member

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    And one more thing. Do realize that by accepting the appointment, you will be creating a lot of work for the people at USMA -- work that may end up being for nothing, so do give some consideration for their valuable time, especially at a busy period in their year.
     
  7. ca2midwestmom

    ca2midwestmom Member

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    Also, if you accept and wait until the last moment to actually decide if you'll show up on R-Day without having done all of the paperwork along the way, you will be scrambling at the last minute to get dental x-rays, police records, security clearance paperwork submitted, etc. Is WP your Plan B? Are you waiting on (or deciding upon) an appointment to another SA?
     
  8. hopeful2018

    hopeful2018 Member

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    I think your smart by thinking it through, this is a life decision. This is a serious commitment.

    I personally don't think your "screwing anyone". Life is about decisions!

    I do agree that you are making a lot of work for yourself and the staff but again if there is doubt take your time. People may criticize but in the end it will all work out
     
  9. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    Disagree, Luke45eagle will be preventing someone for getting an appointment if he accepts his appointment and don't show up on the R-day.

    Appointments are supposed to be given out until the last possible moment, but there are practical limitations. Cannot fill a vacant slot on the R-day. West Point might offer 5 more appointments knowing that X number of new cadets don't show up on the R-day. So Luke45eagle can think him not showing up allowed someone to get in. No, offers of appointments to these 5appointment would have been valid regardless Luke45eagle showed up or not. Why do you West Point waits until the R-day to announce the size of the incoming class.

    If Luke45eagle was a Congressional vacancy winner, he or she just screwed #2 from his or she Congressional district. If #2 kid was good enough to get in by the National Waiting List, than #3 kid got screwed as Congressional vacancies are filled as long there are qualified candidates with matching nomination.

    It's a personal decision, but it will have an impact on another candidate.

    I get sidetracked a lot and I see this situation similar to saying smoking pot is a harmless crime, except the criminal enterprise profiting from it.
     
  10. famof8

    famof8 Member

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    My son, like you, has an appointment that he hasn't accepted yet. I think you are wise to decide by " weighing all your options ".

    While my DS has always had a passion to serve this great country, it has come down as a choice he has to make between branches: Army (West Point) and Navy (NROTC scholarship). He is currently studying up on the differences in branches, besides the obvious land and sea difference, and trying to decide what is right for him.

    Any advice from anyone reading would be much appreciated!

    My advice to you is to try to decide by the 15th, and stick to it!
     
  11. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    Your DS might want to think about what he wants to do first than see what branch provide most opportunities. Nothing is guaranteed, but having more opportunities increases your DS' chance of doing something he wants to do.

    For example, he wants to fly jets - Navy offers more chances to almost no chances in the Army, but no guarantee he will get it.

    He wants to become a Marine to become a grunt (Infantry) - Army offers more chances to become an Infantry officer. Don't know if your DS's NROTC allows him to become a Marine.
     
  12. famof8

    famof8 Member

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    No marine option MemberLG.
     
  13. another13mom

    another13mom Member

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    Last year, on R-day, a mom posted on the 2017 parents facebook page that her incoming new cadet would not get out of the car - they were in the parking lot - Don't wait till then, but yes, this is a big commitment and it deserves serious consideration. Going to West Point does mean sacrificing a normal college experience, and for the first year, sacrificing a lot of freedom your high school friends will have to travel, sleep in, hang out and not have to answer to people telling you at 10 pm to empty trash or at 5:30 am to go for a run. After your first year, you still won't be able to enjoy a beer when you want, or leave for a better dinner two towns over, unless it is within the parameters given for passes or leave. You know yourself - or should - to know if this is the experience you want. If you have doubts, review your options and see what appeals to you more. Don't be the kid in the parking lot.
     
  14. batgirl95

    batgirl95 Member

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    Don't go. My friend lost her spot because the kid who took hers showed up on R-Day looked at his dad and said "this is your dream, not mine." And left. If there's a shadow of doubt, don't go. She got in for the class of 2017 and is stronger academically, but it still sucked that she had to wait a year because someone couldnt make the decision to tell his dad that he didn't want to up come here. Don't decide not to go after accepting an appointment and make someone who wants it more than anything not go. Please. And I am a second applicant. The same thing happened to me and although waiting a year was the best option, knowing that 8 people didn't show up/didn't make requirements on R-day angered me because I wanted it so badly. Please don't do that.


    Sent using the
     
  15. Dixieland

    Dixieland Member

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    :thumb: I agree! When my Firstie was a new cadet, a girl went through all of the proceedings of the morning and the 90-second good-bye, and then refused to get off the bus as it unloaded the NCs to begin their in-processing.
     
  16. agamejb

    agamejb Isabella.

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    Flip a Coin! :) Trust me!

    Hey Luke! You know what will make your decision much easier? Flip a coin!
    Don't laugh. This actually works. I remember an old saying from when I was younger.

    "When you have to make a
    hard decision, flip a coin. Why?
    Because when that coin is in the air, you
    suddenly know what you're hoping for."

    In common terms, the saying is recognizing that even if we CLAIM that we don't know which decision to choose, internally we have already decided on it. Think about it. What can two teams or two people do to settle a dispute? That's right. Just like in the Superbowl, they can flip a coin. :cool:

    The same thing applies to you. As an individual, you have a personal bias. Meaning that no matter what you do to make it APPEAR as if you are "neutral", or don't know which to choose, you will ALWAYS have chosen one in your head and in your heart.

    Luke! Flip a coin. It will make your life a whole lot easier. Trust me. :thumb:
     
  17. GoBlue1984

    GoBlue1984 Member

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    Luke45Eagle and FamOf8 DS,

    Here is what I would add.

    1) Academy life is hard. Only go if you are convinced that you want to be there. It is disciplined, regimented, and can be boring.

    2) WP is steeped with tradition and history. But the allure of the academy (any one of them) wears off. This came from my cadet, not simply my opinion.

    3) WP is a great place to learn to be a leader and learn to serve. The opportunities you will get there are unparalleled. At a recent dinner an O-6 told my cadet that at the academy, cadets are spoiled in their ability to interact with senior officers and in their early careers, they will seldom have individual contact with field grade officers beyond the rank of major. His point was they needed to take advantage to ask questions and learn while they could.

    4) ROTC will give you a more normal college life. In contrast the discipline you learn and have at the academy is a life changing experience. At the academy, my cadet tells me that everyone has similar goals, purpose, and focus.

    5) In contrast to #1, academy life can be fun. The bond cadets feel with each other is unique. My cadet has told me that he feels closer to his friends there than most people he grew up with. The bonds last a lifetime. Think Band of Brothers bonding.

    6) Almost everyone thinks of leaving and thinks of the opportunities they passed up to be there. But no one who makes it through, regrets having done it afterwards.

    7) The one major difference between the academies and civilian college is the honor code. In any other environment, you will not be held to the same standard and accountability as you will at the academy. But you will be surrounded by others who live under those expectations and have a similar commitment to live honorably. In contrast at a civilian college you will be surrounded by others who are trying to get away with things. At the academy the opposite is true.


    Last words: Nothing is guaranteed. You have been given an opportunity that is unique and challenging but there is no guarantee you will make it through. Cadets all struggle with something: academics, physical, or military. If you think you are going to excel at all three, you are mistaken. Every year, a 1C or 2C cadet (at all the academies) is separated because of some deficiency or mistake, and either has to pay back or serve enlisted. Of the entering CO2018, 15% will not graduate (that is the statistic, and that is a higher retention percentage than occurred 15 years ago).

    Entering the academy is a risk: are you going to make it through? Are you going to get hurt? Will you quit during BEAST? Can you survive COW DROWNING and the HOUSE OF HORRORS?

    But civilian college has risks too. You might lose an ROTC scholarship because your grades fall below the median (3.0) of your classmates. You might fail an PFT or not get selected for Field Training because of the competition. You might have a unit commander that just doesn't like you.

    I've read the posts saying "if in doubt, let someone take your place" and read the criticisms for those who jettisoned the opportunity because of doubt. I can't do that. The academy is a personal choice and a great preparation for a military career. Nothing more, nothing less. Only you can decide if it is the right place for you. My only advice is whatever you choose, don't look back.

    Best wishes to you and your future.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2014
  18. jackiejyp7

    jackiejyp7 Jackie

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    Your heart needs to be 200% in. This is service to your country, not a regular college acceptance. If you have doubt, give someone else the opportunity to do what they've wanted all their lives. I withdrew my Air Force appt and ROTC scholarship knowing I would be giving another person a shot at their dream. It wouldn't be fair to hold on to what I knew I didn't want.
    Go with your heart!


    Jackie, USMA USAFA USMMA Candidate for Class of 2018
    Principally Nominated to USMA & USAFA
    Appointed to USMA and USAFA
    USMA Class of 2018
     
  19. educ8

    educ8 Member

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    Funny, our DD wrote to the admissions team asking what was happening on her slate. The admissions counselor told her that there had been an offer extended to someone, but that offer has not been accepted yet. If he accepts it she goes to Penn State, if he declines she does the happy dance and goes to West Point with her brother(who is at USMAPS).

    I don't want to know what district you are in, but I bet my DD hopes it isn't hers. Or if you decide to decline...that it IS hers!
     
  20. hopeful2018

    hopeful2018 Member

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    That's a sad way to see things, someone doesn't get in because of themselves not someone else. People are allowed to weigh their options. While I definitely think he should not wait until rday, I don't think he should rush on anyone's account. There are people that think they are 200% and don't stay through Beast . I have even known of someone who left after two years that thought they were whole
    heatedly in it.
    .
     

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