Athlete recruitment process?

Gupus27654

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Mar 25, 2017
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I'm currently a sophomore and going to one of the soccer camps this April at the USNA. I'm not sure how this process works, and if it's any different from a normal college. It's my dream to go to the usna and I've got a good background with soccer. Does anyone know someone who's been recruited or have been recruited yourself? I wish I knew what to expect at this camp but I guess we'll see. I just want to know what I'm in for. Thanks to anyone who can help
 

Lukieboy06

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Hi,
My son got recruited last year for a sport at the Academy. He got invited for Junior Day and the coach got in contact with him at the beginning of his Senior year. He didn't get any nomination so they helped him with it. I think every sport has allocation for Sup nomination.
 

DesertCaliMom

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When you are there, ask for your area's recruiting coach. That person would be your blue and gold officer if recruited. Introduce yourself, show your knowledge of the program and be prepared to answer typical recruiting questions. Keep up the dialogue after your next season, have film, ask for next steps.

Edit to add- start learning about the NCAA eligibility center as well as the requirements for that, too. If you qualify for Navy, you'll qualify there, just be familiar with the dates and deadlines.
 
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CA_USNA_Dad

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My DD is a recruited athlete. We were planning to visit colleges during spring break last year (DD's junior year) and DD contacted the coach at USNA. We were given a two hour tour of USNA and coach explained all the traditions and answered most of our question. After the trip DD followed up with a handwritten "thank you" card and constantly updated the coach on her progress, both academic and athletic. In the fall of her senior year DD was offered a recruiting trip to USNA where she spent a weekend meeting her potential teammates. For us, the process was a little less nerve wrecking than it seems to be for many others because the coach was DD's primary contact. The entire process is very stressful and it does really help to have an advocate helping your cause. It is a very valuable resource to have a coach on your side and you should work hard to develop a positive relationship.
 

CA_USNA_Dad

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To add to what Lukieboy said, the coach told DD that she should apply to all the possible nomination sources but also told her that they could help her secure a nomination, if need be. DD did get a nomination (2 actually) so it wasn't a problem but the coaches do have pull. Maybe they don't get to make the final decision as some D1 coaches do but their support can nudge the needle to your advantage.
 

NavyHoops

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The recruiting process is very similar to any other D1 school with the exception being the application process. And that is a big exception as it's a long app to include the need for a nomination and passing the physical. If you are good enough and on the recruiting radar you will be contacted by the coaches. Have you filled out the perspective studen athlete (recruiting) form on Navy Sports? If not, do that. Assuming you are going to the elite camp? Obviously doing well could put you on the radar. I hear slot of kids who want to go to a SA and say they want to be recruited but when I asked what other schools are pursuing them it's none. USNA is a D1 school, if you aren't being pursued by other schools, don't expect USNA to recruit you because you want to go there and play a sport (not saying this is you, it's a generalization).

As with all schools and recruiting, one day you might be their #1 guy and the next very little interest. It is a roller coaster in the recruiting world, especially D1 level. It sounds like USNA is where you want to go regardless, so follow the recommendations on the USNA website for rising juniors as far as timeline. 'Blue chip' spots are very limited, don't count on one, especially for sports outside revenue sports (football, basketball, lacrosse). Yes, being sa recruited athlete moves your application POC to the coaches vice someone in admissions. They help guide you through the process and can answer questions.
 

ktnatalk

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As with all schools and recruiting, one day you might be their #1 guy and the next very little interest. It is a roller coaster in the recruiting world, especially D1 level.
Knowing this is extremely important!
 

socalprospect

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Are the academic standards the same for recruited athletes (class rank, SAT/ACT scores)? Our son is in the top 20% with +650 students in his class. He will also need to retake the SAT: 590 math and 540 reading. We have met with the coaches and they indicated that they want his scores up, but they do treat recruits differently. It would seem to us they have since our son has been corresponding with the coaches for over a year, has gone through CVW and has been accepted into summer seminar (which is highly competitive). We've been afraid to ask the coaches, understandably, if our son cannot improve his scores, could they help out with admissions? Has anyone experienced this?
 

CA_USNA_Dad

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Are the academic standards the same for recruited athletes (class rank, SAT/ACT scores)? Our son is in the top 20% with +650 students in his class. He will also need to retake the SAT: 590 math and 540 reading. We have met with the coaches and they indicated that they want his scores up, but they do treat recruits differently. It would seem to us they have since our son has been corresponding with the coaches for over a year, has gone through CVW and has been accepted into summer seminar (which is highly competitive). We've been afraid to ask the coaches, understandably, if our son cannot improve his scores, could they help out with admissions? Has anyone experienced this?

It all depends on the athletic ability of the candidate and the needs of the team (and SA). Having said that, the scores and even the class rank seems low. He may not be able to do much about the rank but he could and should do something to improve his scores. As a professional in the test prep industry, I would recommend...

1. Tutoring if you could afford it and it is available in your area.
2. Go through exercises on Kahn Academy website
3. Set aside a specific number of hours per week dedicated to the SAT (or ACT).

Students (and people in general) are good at whatever they spend the time and effort doing. Make SATs a priority until the scores get more competitive.
 

NavyHoops

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Are the academic standards the same for recruited athletes (class rank, SAT/ACT scores)? Our son is in the top 20% with +650 students in his class. He will also need to retake the SAT: 590 math and 540 reading. We have met with the coaches and they indicated that they want his scores up, but they do treat recruits differently. It would seem to us they have since our son has been corresponding with the coaches for over a year, has gone through CVW and has been accepted into summer seminar (which is highly competitive). We've been afraid to ask the coaches, understandably, if our son cannot improve his scores, could they help out with admissions? Has anyone experienced this?

Yes and no, an athlete must be scholastically qualified like everyone else. His SATs do need come up. Yes recruits are handled by coaches for admissions vice an admissions counselor. They go to the same admissions board as everyone else. Also, if your DS has an interest in NAPS, I would express that to the coaches.

Let me expand on the yes and no part. As mentioned above there are no free passes for athletes. A coach, and this heavily can depend on the sport, has so many "blue chips" in their pocket. Blue Chips are essentially recruits they can go to bat for in admissions. They must be 3Q for this to happen. They only get so many of these, some sports it might 1 maybe 2. Others like football might have a dozen or more. The other part that you won't necessarily know and can change by the hour is how big of a recruit your DS is. You could literally go from being the #1 guy they want to someone they have little interest in depending on a number of factors. Coaches will not and generally are not fully transparent on this. Its because they don't want to show their cards and as mentioned it can change so quickly. For example... the coaches could have an inbound recruit coming from NAPS who is slated to be #1 on the depth chart. If they don't make the cut, all of a sudden there could be a large gap in that position and your DS might move up on the list in terms of need for the team. It could also go the other way with a recruit was they didn't think would qualify in some way all of sudden does or maybe thought they were going somewhere else all of a sudden commits. This part of the recruiting process is not unique to USNA, it is part of the recruiting game across all NCAA schools, especially the D1 level.

Corresponding with coaches is a great first step, but that doesn't really gauge how high on the list of recruits they are. CVW is separate for athletics recruiting. An official NCAA visit is usually a better gauge on how much the coaches want someone vice a CVW or correspondence.
 
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Clark Rogers

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My DS is a recruited athlete in the Class of '21. A few things to keep in mind:

1. Talk to your current HS and Club Coaches. Let them know what you are thinking and get an honest assessment from them about your ability to play at that level. College coaches, USNA included, will call either directly or find out about you through the network. Important to be realistic.
2. Take the initiative and be politely persistent. Most athletes/candidates are not 4star football recruits where schools will find you. You have to make yourself identifiable and follow up regularly. Let the staff know when you are going to be on the yard. Typically, coaching staffs are happy to meet even in unofficial situations.
3. Recognize that you need to fit within the team and the style they play.
4. The USNA coaches do have influence with admissions and will use it for the right fit. If you are the right fit and get through the initial screens, be ready to indicate that USNA is your top 1 or 2 choices. Coaches of secondary sports won't use their admissions capital or even official visit budgets on someone who is just testing the waters.

Best of luck
 

socalprospect

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Thanks for the information. Really appreciate the information as we're still learning about the process. Go Navy!
 

MidEMSmom

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I can tell you from experience that the recruiting process is basically the same at USNA as it is at other colleges. My son is a plebe soccer recruit and his scores ( gpa,sat, act) needed to be on par with the entrance requirements for ALL applicants. There are also physical requirements that need to be met as well as a congressional nomination. If you want to attend USNA, I would advise emailing the coach directly to get on his radar and let him know youre attending the soccer camp. Coaches cannot push you through as a recruit if you do not meet the academic requirements. You could be recommended to go to a Navy prep school if the coach wants you but are not quite ready due to lower test scores. Every situation is different. Good luck - it's an amazing place - GO NAVY!!!
Are the academic standards the same for recruited athletes (class rank, SAT/ACT scores)? Our son is in the top 20% with +650 students in his class. He will also need to retake the SAT: 590 math and 540 reading. We have met with the coaches and they indicated that they want his scores up, but they do treat recruits differently. It would seem to us they have since our son has been corresponding with the coaches for over a year, has gone through CVW and has been accepted into summer seminar (which is highly competitive). We've been afraid to ask the coaches, understandably, if our son cannot improve his scores, could they help out with admissions? Has anyone experienced this?
I'm currently a sophomore and going to one of the soccer camps this April at the USNA. I'm not sure how this process works, and if it's any different from a normal college. It's my dream to go to the usna and I've got a good background with soccer. Does anyone know someone who's been recruited or have been recruited yourself? I wish I knew what to expect at this camp but I guess we'll see. I just want to know what I'm in for. Thanks to anyone who can help
 

parent

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If you are a star and close then NAPS is it. Otherwise you need to meet the academic requirements! BTW they can and will pull strings remember it is the US Government after all. they have quotas to meet also and peopll eto answer too.
 

GNBA2020

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The recruitment process will start up in earnest in your junior year. You can always contact the college coaches and tell them about you and your interest in Navy Mens Soccer; however, until the summer after your Junior year, the NCAA limits the amount of contact they can have with you. They will likely just send you information about their camps. That's OK because you are getting on their radar screen. Anytime that you are in a tournament, let them know that you are playing and ask them to come and see you. They have a limited budget and thus may not be able to attend smaller, regional tournaments but still send them an email. The two larger tournaments that Navy coaches go to (as well as many other college coaches) are Disney and Dallas Cup (see Tweet about going to Dallas Cup https://twitter.com/navymsoccer?lang=en). If you are able to play in one or both of these, you definitely want the coaches to know you will be there and are VERY interested in Navy Mens Soccer. There is a reasonably good chance that they will come to see you play. If you don't play in these tournaments, then the Navy camp and/or other regional camps attended by Navy coaches are good alternatives. Again, email them BEFORE you arrrive so that they know that you are an interested recuit AND email them afterwards thanking them for coming to see you play or for the camp. Finally, consider video of your play and sending them highlights via YouTube. This will give them an idea of your skill sets and whether or not you would fit into their system.

Agree with others that you don't have to be in the top academically but you need to be in the ballpark to be competative. If you haven't already found them, here are the current Navy Mens Soccer coaches: http://www.navysports.com/sports/m-soccer/coachingstaff.html

Good Luck.

Go Navy, Beat Army
 

landlock

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Agree with all the good advice here. I would add, be prepared for lots of ups and downs.... lots. Hopefully she is a blue chip recruit, but if not it can be quite an emotional ride. My daughter was not recruited but refused to give up after going to what seemed like a recruitment soccer camp here between sophmore and junior year. She thought she had a great ID camp and when she asked the position coach where she stood he said sorry, they had committed a player at her position the camp before hers! I always wondered if she had started earlier would she have been the "recruit". So I would recommend starting early. Who knows my DD may not have been the one even if she started early but it could not hurt...especially in girls soccer they commit early nationwide at the good schools. She was told she would have to get in on her own, brutal, but at least she knew. USNA was still the only place she wanted to go. She took the SAT's 6 times, and an SAT course, to get math up to 690 from mid 500's. Tried ACT's as well but fared worse. Kept training and playing soccer on a top 50 team in the country. Was a 4 year started and captain the last 3 years on HS team which I believe probably helped her application a lot. Eventually got an appointment and tried to walk on. She was the last walk-on cut, but moved on to other sports. Finishing her second year and absolutely loves the place and its mission, even without soccer. So your child needs to want to go for the right reasons, to be a naval officer. Good luck!!
 

MammaMia

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DS is a current NMS player and I echo the sentiments expressed here. The most important thing is for you to want to attend the Naval Academy because of its mission, not for soccer. There are so many things out of your control - change of coaching staff, injury, other recruits in your position in your same year - if things change, if you break your ankle in a bad tackle the second day of preseason training, do you still want to be there? Study what they study (including taking 17 - 21 credits a semester in season, taking 3 semesters of calculus, electrical engineering, navigation - regardless of your major)? Commit to the military mission (including not getting your first choice at service selection and having to take your second or third choice)? Having 12 hours of off-campus liberty a week your plebe year? The happiest varsity athletes (and former varsity athletes) are in 100% for all the non-soccer aspects of USNA. And if you do make the team, understand that you may train 110% and play 0%, even if you were a star in your high school and on your club team. If soccer is the biggest thing in your life, that's awesome - but be realistic about your playing prospects and understand that the academics at service academies are rigorous and emphasized more than at most non-military D-1 schools.
 
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Sorry for necroing this thread.

Does anyone know how much admissions help rowing gives? I've been emailing the heavyweight coach a bit. There's no way they can get a borderline appointee in, is there?
 

Old Navy BGO

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Does anyone know how much admissions help rowing gives? I've been emailing the heavyweight coach a bit. There's no way they can get a borderline appointee in, is there?

Someone above made the comment that it depends on how good you are , and how bad the coach wants you, but don't count on it.
 

time2

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It also appears that some think they can bypass the admissions requirements (and/or increase their chance of an appointment) by simply being 'recruited' and that is incorrect. You still need to be 3Q AND have a NOM to be in the running for an appointment. No one who attends an SA pays any tuition/room/board, so the financial incentive of being 'recruited' at a civilian college isn't there at an SA. The fact a coach has contact with you is no guarantee of an appointment. Everyone being recruited is NOT considered a 'blue chip'. As mentioned above, where you stand with a specific coach can change due a number of factors you have no control over. You also under no obligation to continue playing a sport for which you are recruited at an SA, unlike a civilian college where you would probably lose whatever financial incentive they offered.

Some athletes CAN successfully balance all of the demands on their time associated with an SA, however, many cannot and the bigger picture is being able to balance your priorities in order to graduate.
 
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