Changes to the ACT

boxmm24

Member
This is brilliant (particularly the part about being able to retake only certain sections. Too bad it doesn't take effect until next September.

 

Heatherg21

Member
WOW, wish it were active now. My DS brain is mush after having taken the ACT 3 times to improve his scores. Hopefully this saves money in score sends if they superscore the report.
 

Objective

Member
Very interesting. DS did very well on the ACT but was unsatisfied with one specific section. So, he re-took the test. For 3 sections, he filled in choice "C" for every question. For the section he was concerned with, he tried hard and earned the score he wanted. Despite a 99% Superscore, one Ivy was extremely unhappy with what he did and asked for a written explanation. This change would have prevented that stress
 
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AROTC-dad

Moderator
5-Year Member
Very interesting. DS did very well on the ACT but was unsatisfied with one specific section. So, he re-took the test. For 3 sections, he filled in choice "C" for every question. For the section he was concerned with, he tried hard and earned the score he wanted. Despite a 99% Superscore, one Ivy was extremely unhappy with what he did and asked for a written explanation. This change would have prevented that stress
Your experience underscores one of the risks associated with this "single" section strategy. There are a few schools that do take an average of all scores, or worse yet, accept your latest score only, as opposed to super scoring.

Plan B school consideration needs to be part of your overall testing approach.
 

Holden100

Member
Reddit's going crazy right now with juniors who've taken the exam this year thinking colleges will perceive their scores as watered down ACTs when they submit to colleges. DS's experience thus far is that many of the schools where he applied did not superscore the ACT, but did the SAT, so I'm kinda surprised the ACT is doing this. Most said they took the highest single setting composite, but would consider other section scores (so send them all in). Curious how colleges will respond and how much will ACT be charging for this. . .
 
Georgetown just made a change as well...they require 3 SAT Subject Tests (aka SAT II) in addition to SAT or ACT. But they just changed it to allow AP exams or any combination of SAT II/AP exams to count towards that requirement. Makes sense to me, an AP exam is a worthy substitute.
DS rushed to get a SAT II Math 2 test done in time for Georgetown EA, and it turned out to be his best score, so it's good that they hadn't changed it before now I guess!
I think Georgetown is one of the few schools that require 3 SAT II tests, from what we've found. But they take ALL sittings of all tests, they don't participate in "score choice" for tests.
 

Heatherg21

Member
As far as checking c's for the sections the student didn't want/need to improve on, and only focusing on the one section, my DS said this has no true advantage. You have to complete portions within the time allotted, so speeding through one section doesn't grant you more time on the section you are focused on. Only advantage might be to not have tuckered out your brain prior to the section you are worried about.
I also wondered about the new score report costs. They nickle and dime you to death as it is, I can imagine a premium charge for your super score reports would be pending.
I hesitate to say that standardizing how colleges/academies consider these scores would be a good thing. I generally don't think all things need or should be standardized. But it would make the process simpler for sure. Colleges changing their procedures, like Georgetown did make it difficult. Let's say kid A takes tests his junior year, with college A in mind. Then changes his mind to college B in the fall of senior year and they have a different policy? Limited time to retake and meet criteria. Not every student knows exactly where they want to apply and doesn't waiver from those choices early on.
 
I think the only solution is to take all the tests that your most demanding (test-wise) school wants, then you'll have all bases covered.
I for one thing much more of it should be standardized. It's very tough on kids and on teachers too (recs). But of course, the common app has led to kids applying 20 schools, and that's not great either.
 
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