CLIP-B is alive and well....

botello

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Jan 4, 2022
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131
My son is considering a BA versus BS for the language hours. He will be NROTC, but my question is really more about students starting a completely new language in college. I would think it would be extremely difficult with zero experience; how successful are new language learners in college? I know some will say if he puts his mind to it and I get that...but I'm curious about that along with the regular demands of a college student along with ROTC requirements.
 

WT Door

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Joined
Dec 25, 2019
Messages
576
My son is considering a BA versus BS for the language hours. He will be NROTC, but my question is really more about students starting a completely new language in college. I would think it would be extremely difficult with zero experience; how successful are new language learners in college? I know some will say if he puts his mind to it and I get that...but I'm curious about that along with the regular demands of a college student along with ROTC requirements.
I'm not sure how successful new language learners are but here is my due centesimi worth (two cents). It’s based on having attended the Defense Language Institute (DLI) in Monterrey, California for Italian language study. My first question is, what language does your son intend to study? At DLI, the romance languages (French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese) are six months long. The Slavic languages a little longer, with Mandarin and Arabic being the longest – more than a year, if I remember correctly. I’d also ask, does your son have an interest and ear for languages? Whether we acknowledge it or not, some people are better at learning languages than others. Just as some do better in STEM courses. Learning a new language is going to be time intensive. Why? Your son will be learning language constructs very different from English; he’ll have limited vocabulary and will have to listen, speak, read and take exams in the target language. Along with the other college courses and ROTC, learning a new language is going to be very demanding. Buona fortuna a lui. (Good luck to him).
 

cb7893

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Dec 6, 2011
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3,036
My son is considering a BA versus BS for the language hours. He will be NROTC, but my question is really more about students starting a completely new language in college. I would think it would be extremely difficult with zero experience; how successful are new language learners in college? I know some will say if he puts his mind to it and I get that...but I'm curious about that along with the regular demands of a college student along with ROTC requirements.
I am the self-appointed SAF language expert. I am to foreign language what @THParent is to guns and bacon.
First off your son will not be going to the Defense Language Institute. He would have available Project Go available after contracting. It is an intensive paid for Summer immersive language program for Cadets and Mids, SA or xROTC.

I had two years of HS French and started Russian when I began college. I did fine because I was interested in the history, geo politics and culture of the Soviet Bloc. My suggestion would be to pick a language, any language whose culture, politics or history interests him. If he isn’t interested he will neither practice it nor retain it.
 
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THmom

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Apr 2, 2019
Messages
624
I am the self-appointed SAF language expert. I am to foreign language what @THParent is to guns and bacon.
First off your son will not be going to the Defense Language Institute. He would have available Project Go available after contracting. It is an intensive paid for Summer immersive language program for Cadets and Mids, SA or xROTC.

I had two years of HS French and started Russian when I began college. I did fine because I was interested in the history, geo politics and culture of the Soviet Bloc. My suggestion would be to pick a language, any language whose culture, politics or history interests him. If he isn’t interested he will neither practice it nor retain it.
Actually, Project GO is ROTC-specific, and one does not need to be contracted. https://www.rotcprojectgo.org/eligibility-selection
 

THmom

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Apr 2, 2019
Messages
624
Thank you. I stand corrected.

My DS, AROTC, did the Russian Course in Kyiv several years ago. Can’t recommend it enough.

I’ll no longer compare myself to @THPare…a real expert.
Wasn’t sure whether to LOL or thumbs up. What is your DS doing now? Mine seems to be on similar path.
 

cb7893

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Dec 6, 2011
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3,036
Although Russian is a part of his job requirement, the Project GO experience was not a determining factor in the long run to what he is doing now. His advancement was based on how well he did his job as a Signal Officer, i.e. making sure all the comms work.

I don't know where your DS is in terms of career path, but I can only encourage him to do everything possible to keep the language fresh. That includes changing the language interface on digital devices, watching TV/movies in the chosen language, never being afraid to strike up a conversation about anything. One never really knows when it could come in handy. It is absolutely a differentiator among one's cohort. That has been my DS's experience.
 

nuensis

10-Year Member
Joined
May 23, 2011
Messages
888
My son is considering a BA versus BS for the language hours. He will be NROTC, but my question is really more about students starting a completely new language in college. I would think it would be extremely difficult with zero experience; how successful are new language learners in college? I know some will say if he puts his mind to it and I get that...but I'm curious about that along with the regular demands of a college student along with ROTC requirements.
If Navy, there are career benefits to developing INDOPACOM AO expertise (particular Far East, East Asia). A B.A. in Far East or East Asia-related studies may result in award of a additional qualification designator and additional consideration for promotion.

The most recent convening orders (document discussing favorable or priority skills or traits for promotion) specifically outline this expertise as desirable.

 
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