DQ

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by NoodlersDad, Jul 13, 2017.

  1. NoodlersDad

    NoodlersDad Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2014
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    1
    Has anyone ever heard of a candidate being DQ'd for a medical reason that the DoDMERB located themselves? As in, the DoD doc found it three years ago and now it's a DQ issue. No aggravation, no pain, no complaint, no problemo.
     
    Stealth_81 likes this.
  2. Maplerock

    Maplerock Proud to be an American 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    1,047
    I think you'll have to be more specific to get some educated responses.
     
  3. Pima

    Pima 10-Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    13,862
    Likes Received:
    2,013
    I agree with Maplerock, more info is needed.

    DoDMERB docs are not there just to sign off on the medical history form you submit to them. They are there to give you a physical exam. IF that doc found something than it was their responsibility to report it on your exam.

    I am going to make the assumption since you said it was 3 yrs ago, that they are now doing their exit DoDMERB exam this yr for commissioning. DoDMERB exams are only valid for 2 years, thus, as rising seniors in college they will have another exam to make sure they are still qualified for duty.

    My advice is if this is a true worry get your medical records in order now.

    It is rare, but there is a poster here that went to USAFA (hornetguy). He was pilot qualified when he commissioned. However, he was given an elite slot after commissioning to get his Ph.D through Rand (3 yrs), with a follow on to pilot training. During those 3 yrs., the exam process changed. He arrived at UPT, took another exam, and they DQd him due to the new regulations. He has no real problems with his eyes, and in the corporate world nobody would have given a 2nd notice. HOWEVER, not true with the AF. He even paid for specialist and fought it to the highest level, but to no avail. Hornet is now happily living life as a civilian.

    Just saying.

    OBTW, I don't know which branch or what career field your child wants, but I can tell you the exams in the AF do not ever end. If you go rated, you do an annual exam. They rotate between what is called the short (DoDMERB) and long (FAA). IE. In 2017 you take the short. (45 min exam). In 2018 you take the long (2+ hrs). 2019 you take the short again, and so on and so forth until you leave the service, at which point you do another exam for disability aspects!
     
  4. Maplerock

    Maplerock Proud to be an American 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    1,047
    Thanks Puma! Usually no one agrees with me. :)
     
  5. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2014
    Messages:
    5,012
    Likes Received:
    4,968
    Hmmm...Maple, your 599 "likes" indicates otherwise. ;)
     
    Nateldridge and Maplerock like this.
  6. NoodlersDad

    NoodlersDad Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2014
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    1
    The DodMERB doc told him he had scoliosis when he applied for the NROTC and USNA. Up to that point we had no idea. The doc cleared him for service. Three years later, he completes his pre commissioning physical with no issues. One month later the OCS doc tells him his scoliosis is a reason for DQ.
     
  7. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2014
    Messages:
    5,012
    Likes Received:
    4,968
    Has your DS been advised of the status of any waiver request?
     
  8. NoodlersDad

    NoodlersDad Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2014
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    1
    No, no instructions at all. Just a plane ticket home. No orders. No options. No instructions. Just a word of mouth statement by doc that his back makes him unserviceable.
     
  9. kp2001

    kp2001 10-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,275
    Likes Received:
    277
    I don't think I have enough clarity...you mention NROTC, USNA, and OCS. Did he actually end up at either ROTC or USNA?

    Normally there is a bit more involved if someone goes through those programs and passes their commissioning physical and then has something discovered at USMC OCS (I only say USMC bc rotc/USNA wouldn't do Navy OCS).

    If it was did those applications years ago, but didn't end up going and recently did a commissioning physical and then proceeded to OCS then yes I can see a medical issue discovered at OCS playing out the way you describe.

    A third and more nefarious explanation would be that the back had nothing to do with why your child left OCS, but is being used as a cover story to not disappoint the family/friends/self.

    I'm not at all saying that third one is likely, but it has happened in the past. Would depend on amplifying information.
     
    NoodlersDad likes this.
  10. Pima

    Pima 10-Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    13,862
    Likes Received:
    2,013
    Actually, for scoliosis it does happen, or at least happened to my DH. He was AFROTC and had his DoDMERB. Due to family history he was up front and stated that there was a history (his sister has a metal rod in her back from scoliosis surgery) when he was entering AFROTC. He passed with no need of a waiver, but again it was in his original exam report.

    FFWD to his exit exam as a senior. He was going rated, thus he not only needed to pass the DoDMERB commissioning exam, but also the FAA FC1 physical. He was informed that he did not pass. His parents took him to his sisters specialist (world reknown, featured in every med journal) at Sloane Kettering. The doc re-did the xrays of his back, and proved that he did indeed meet the requirements, with no need for a waiver. From what I understand the reason why his xrays with the AF placed him in the DQ is because if you breathe during it, the degree can change. The doc sent a letter with all of the medical exams that his parents paid for to HQ AFROTC. They accepted his report, BUT please understand this doc was a guy that was the DOC back at that time that you would call for advice. He was even in People Magazine for this new surgery to correct scoliosis.
    ~ JMPO, hard to have the med boards fight the recommendation from a doctor that specializes in this medical arena. IOWS, be like his parents and go to a specialist that only deals with scoliosis. One that does the surgeries.

    He flew ejection seat fighters for 21 yrs. and never once needed a waiver.

    I am not trying to give you hope. I am trying to say sometimes finding a specialist is the worth the cost. I work in Men's retail. I can tell you that we constantly say for this generation when they are getting fitted for a suit compared to their father, all of them have some form of posture issues. I am not saying they have scoliosis, I am saying that these kids carried 30lb backpacks full of books for yrs, and typically wore it only on one arm, causing posture issues. I yank their shoulders when fitting them and VOILA they are fine. I am not a doc. I am only enforcing why you should take him to a doc. Is it posture or is it a curvature of his spine?
    ~ I would also say as a parent take him to a specialist regardless of him commissioning. Scoliosis is not something to take lightly. A curvature can impact organs. It can impact their hips, knees, etc. Straightening the spine is important for years to come, especially when they get older.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2017
    turtlerunnernc likes this.
  11. Idlewild

    Idlewild Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2016
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    96
    Daughter had a mild curvature (not enough to be labeled scoliosis) and was DQd during application process. Went through the remedial and learned a lot. They mentioned that she would be rechecked for this during her time at the academy. Likely they measured and found the degree did not meet the standards or that the bone structure was impinging on other organs. Find out all of the info first and find someone to try to help.