Financial aid for those that drop from academies

MtJo

Member
Kids that drop from any of the academies-- It happens as we have learned thru personal experience. We have been so grateful for the parents that have reached out to us with encouragement and information going forward to plan B. We did not know it and thought it would be a great thread to have on here for those that are looking for any information.
For FAFSA purposes only, it is a requirement that a person has a one-day minimum requirement of active duty service in the Armed Forces to be considered a veteran. This can be interpreted any cadet that has been sworn in would be considered a veteran with an honorable discharge for financial aid. It does not make them eligible for any other veteran benefits, it is only for FAFSA purposes. The change will allow the student to be considered an independent student instead of a dependent student from their parents. It will allow them more financial aid on their own and will completely remove parents from the equation of aid.
This is the source for more information. http://www.finaid.org/military/veteranstatus.phtml
 

Capt MJ

10-Year Member
Be sure to read the article for full discussion of the type of discharges and the types that qualify.

An “honorable discharge” as noted by the OP is not the only category. SA Mids and cadets are often given “General-under honorable conditions,” which is not the same as an Honorable. Both are good for FAFSA. Do not let your separating mid or cadet ever lose that DD-214. It’s a key document.

Since a DD (Dishonorable Discharge) is usually only awarded punitively and not administratively, after a Court-Martial, those situations are fairly clear.

Keeper post!
 

Old Navy BGO

5-Year Member
Looks like this is an older post, but want to amplify a little ... I apologize if terms are slightly off, this is recollection from NL class at USNA (law for the Junior Officer), as well as Legal Officer School almost 35 years ago. As CAPT MJ notes., Midshipman are usually administratively separated (ADSEP), on the the General Under Honorable Condition. Both Honorable and General-Under Honorable Conditions are considered good service, and don't impact you in the future.

A General-Under Other than Honorable (G-OTH) administrative separation is a bad thing, and is not considered good service. I don't know how often it is applied at a Service Academy, but would expect if the reason for separation was serious enough (e.g. drug use without courts martial). When I was in Legal Officer School, they told us that a G-OTH carried almost as much stigma as a Bad Conduct Discharge or Dishonorable Discharge (BCD and DD are different levels of BAD !). the difference being that the G-OTH was awarded using a Administrative Process and the BCD/DD awarded at Courts martial. However, it is my recollection that the G-OTH can only be awarded as a result of a hearing process that allows the servicemember due process.

Bottom line, if you are involved in misconduct while at a Service Academy, and are being separated, make sure you know what type of separation you are getting ...a G-OTH can affect you the rest of your life ! (And a BCD/DD will affect you the rest of your life).
 
This caught my eye. If your kid drops from an academy (it's not 100% so hate to think about those this happens to) I heard that you must "pay back" the tuition. Does anyone know what this means or what the actual financial impact or amount might be? Kinda terrifying thought!
 
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Capt MJ

10-Year Member
This caught my eye. If your kid drops from an academy (it's not 100% so hate to think about those this happens to) I heard that you must "pay back" the tuition. Does anyone know what this means or what the actual financial impact or amount might be? Kinda terrifying thought!
Quick overview, and not bothering right now with exceptions, caveats, etc., using USNA scenario (expect USMA, USAFA, USCGA to be roughly similar, USMMA is often different because of their non-active duty model)
- First two years, can walk away with no service obligation, no repayment
- Superintendent has discretion in all requirements for payback
- Medical issues requiring involuntary separation during the last two years, very low probability for payback
- Misconduct issues leading to involuntary separation, high probability of repayment
- Performance issues (can’t pass PRT, can’t meet weight standards, etc.), by graduation, some probability of repayment
- Academic issues the last two years, failure to meet required standards by graduation, some probability of repayment
- Voluntary separation the last two years, case basis. Ex: Mid’s mom diagnosed with fast-moving terminal cancer, younger kids at home, mid asks to go home, humanitarian case, repayment waived. Ex: Mid decides 2/c year to join GF/BF at their college and simply bails, high probability of repayment.

To USNA’s credit, at the academic boards held at semester ends and beginnings for those struggling in academics, much help is given to those who are struggling. The ones at the end of 3/c year, when “good mids” who have continued to be borderline and, based on USNA’s years of experience, not likely to make it even with major switching, summer school and tutors, often lead to heartbreaking involuntary separations, but likely saving them repayment from a separation in the last 2 years.

Payback amounts can easily be in the six digits.

Quick and dirty.
 
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Quick overview, and not bothering right now with exceptions, caveats, etc.:
- First two years, can walk away with no service obligation, no repayment
- Superintendent has discretion in all requirements for payback
- Medical issues requiring involuntary separation during the last two years, very low probability for payback
- Misconduct issues leading to involuntary separation, high probability of repayment
- Performance issues (can’t pass PRT, can’t meet weight standards, etc.), by graduation, some probability of repayment
- Academic issues the last two years, failure to meet required standards by graduation, some probability of repayment
- Voluntary separation the last two years, case basis. Ex: Mid’s mom diagnosed with fast-moving terminal cancer, younger kids at home, mid asks to go home, humanitarian case, repayment waived. Ex: Mid decides 2/c year to join GF/BF at their college and simply bails, high probability of repayment.

To USNA’s credit, at the academic boards held at semester ends and beginnings for those struggling in academics, much help is given to those who are struggling. The ones at the end of 3/c year, when “good mids” who have continued to be borderline and, based on USNA’s years of experience, not likely to make it even with major switching, summer school and tutors, often lead to heartbreaking involuntary separations, but likely saving them repayment from a separation in the last 2 years.

Payback amounts can easily be in the six digits.

Quick and dirty.
Does this hold true ( in principle) for other SAs as well.?
 
This caught my eye. If your kid drops from an academy (it's not 100% so hate to think about those this happens to) I heard that you must "pay back" the tuition. Does anyone know what this means or what the actual financial impact or amount might be? Kinda terrifying thought!
Quick overview, and not bothering right now with exceptions, caveats, etc., using USNA scenario (expect USMA, USAFA, USCGA to be roughly similar, USMMA is often different because of their non-active duty model)
- First two years, can walk away with no service obligation, no repayment
- Superintendent has discretion in all requirements for payback
- Medical issues requiring involuntary separation during the last two years, very low probability for payback
- Misconduct issues leading to involuntary separation, high probability of repayment
- Performance issues (can’t pass PRT, can’t meet weight standards, etc.), by graduation, some probability of repayment
- Academic issues the last two years, failure to meet required standards by graduation, some probability of repayment
- Voluntary separation the last two years, case basis. Ex: Mid’s mom diagnosed with fast-moving terminal cancer, younger kids at home, mid asks to go home, humanitarian case, repayment waived. Ex: Mid decides 2/c year to join GF/BF at their college and simply bails, high probability of repayment.

To USNA’s credit, at the academic boards held at semester ends and beginnings for those struggling in academics, much help is given to those who are struggling. The ones at the end of 3/c year, when “good mids” who have continued to be borderline and, based on USNA’s years of experience, not likely to make it even with major switching, summer school and tutors, often lead to heartbreaking involuntary separations, but likely saving them repayment from a separation in the last 2 years.

Payback amounts can easily be in the six digits.

Quick and dirty.
Thank you, that helps my understanding a lot.
 

Capt MJ

10-Year Member
I omitted involuntary separation due to honor issues in the last 2 years - high probability of repayment.
 

kpmom2013

10-Year Member
Capt MJ's probability list is what I have seen happen at USMMA also. Bottom line is if a cadet/mid is going to leave an academy voluntarily, he or she is well-advised to do so before reporting for 2/C year.
 
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