Highschool junior with aspirations to get into West Point Academy?

Y_D1922

Member
Hello everyone, im new to this forum, and honestly ive look deeply into a case i was in but i never really found information on it. So where to start.

Im in highschool as a junior (17), and i have had a burning desire to become an army officer,and the best one i can possibly be. whether it would be ROTC or the academy. The problem is in freshman i screwed up badly due to personal problems that i had, while in sophmore i did recieve straight As, this year i went back to being very lazy, due to the fact that with my highschool gpa (2.5) the academies wont even bother looking at me.

Realistically i wont be able to raise my gpa high enough, so i am looking towards community college and to basically take rotc there (it is possible in MDC for army). I was wondering if i

1.performed extremely
well in community college (3.9 to 4.0 gpa)
2.taking pleb-related classes,
3.reccomandation from ROTC and/or congressman
4.High SAT/ACT scores
5.200+ community hours at church/library/hospital
6.i dont play varsity sports, but i do swim/play tennis very much, and am always active going to the gym becoming fit.
7. Have been in multiple clubs (FBLA, JCC, Chess ect...)

Would it be possible to get admitted into the academy with this record speaking hypothetically? And would they pay attention more to your community college record (gpa ect..) or will my highschool record damage my chances? I will work hard for it because i am ambitious and very determined to get into it. and i know i wont be accepted my first time, but i plan to apply multiple times, and if i dont, i always have an ROTC scholarship as a backup plan so i can still go for my goal to becominf an army officer.
 
You'll never know if you don't try, but I'd suggest that you first work on improving enough for ROTC. Then once you prove yourself in ROTC, you can then ask your commanding officer for advice about WP.

ROTC is a perfectly acceptable path to becoming an officer in the army.
 

Y_D1922

Member
You'll never know if you don't try, but I'd suggest that you first work on improving enough for ROTC. Then once you prove yourself in ROTC, you can then ask your commanding officer for advice about WP.

ROTC is a perfectly acceptable path to becoming an officer in the army.
Does ROTC produce officers of the same caliber as West point cadets?
 

Y_D1922

Member
I hope you are all aware english was not my first language. Just answer the question or dont bother wasting my time. First post and i already come by to unpleasant people.
 

candor

Member
From what I know, military officers are officers no matter where they are made. ROTC and USMA would produce the same high quality people, but the journey to the destination differs greatly. Make sure that your #1 goal is to serve, and if USMA is your dream, apply! If the worst comes to worst, you go to a community college and join ROTC; apply again.

I applied for ROTC scholarships this year, and have studied a lot into it. I'd say the only generic difference is the environment that you are placed in...but the rigor and intensity is still there. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

If you need any advice on the application process, PM me! I'd love to talk. I'm a current applicant for the service academies as well as ROTC.

Best.
 

brovol

Member
I hope you are all aware english was not my first language. Just answer the question or dont bother wasting my time. First post and i already come by to unpleasant people.
USMA has tough admission standards. Not only do you need good grades in tough classes, and top standardized test scores, but you need to impress both the admissions committee and nominations panels with written and in the case of MOC nominations, oral presentation. Both substance and style count. Your post jumps out to those familiar with the standard as being conspicuously below grade. So much so, in fact, that, rather than just taking the "polite" approach, some here are just honest and frank, pointing you to how your first impression plays with the rest of us.

There is a lot of information available online addressing what it takes to get into West Point. Read up and assess for yourself where you stand. English being a second language could actually help your application, but only if you can read and write in English at the same level as successful candidates. Math and English are the two most relevant ACT subscores, for example.

You came here for honest insight. If you are not interested in candid honest replies, let us know. Otherwise, take the replies however you wish.
 
If the comments about your grammar bothered you, then I can not recommend WP to you as it seems that you may be far too sensitive for WP.
At WP you will be corrected (and sometimes corrected rather harshly) for extremely minor infractions and if being corrected over an important infraction (improper grammar in written communication) bothers you, then you may need to consider another path going forward.
 

jagger19

Member
Look, man, during Beast you're going to be yelled at and forced to do push-ups because you scratched your nose without permission. The little things will be your biggest problem here. Nobody here was being rude about the correction, and if you are going to be offended over being molded into a better person you will have a very difficult time here. If people turning you into a better version of yourself is seen as being unpleasant, you will always be having an unpleasant time here.

As for actually getting into here, a 3.9+ GPA is a great start, from there you should look at the profiles of other admitted classes. You can gauge the scores on the SAT/ ACT you will need for admittance. Extra-curricular activities will be useful in bolstering your application, so I'd recommend getting in on those. Otherwise, just be the best you can be, and if West Point doesn't work out ROTC is just another opportunity towards being an officer.
 

Y_D1922

Member
USMA has tough admission standards. Not only do you need good grades in tough classes, and top standardized test scores, but you need to impress both the admissions committee and nominations panels with written and in the case of MOC nominations, oral presentation. Both substance and style count. Your post jumps out to those familiar with the standard as being conspicuously below grade. So much so, in fact, that, rather than just taking the "polite" approach, some here are just honest and frank, pointing you to how your first impression plays with the rest of us.

There is a lot of information available online addressing what it takes to get into West Point. Read up and assess for yourself where you stand. English being a second language could actually help your application, but only if you can read and write in English at the same level as successful candidates. Math and English are the two most relevant ACT subscores, for example.

You came here for honest insight. If you are not interested in candid honest replies, let us know. Otherwise, take the replies however you wish.
Honestly i appreciate the honest answer. I have been criticized twice due to me being hispanic and not speaking english correctly. It only infuriates me because i know im not very good, but at least i try my best in pushing with my goals.
 

Y_D1922

Member
Look, man, during Beast you're going to be yelled at and forced to do push-ups because you scratched your nose without permission. The little things will be your biggest problem here. Nobody here was being rude about the correction, and if you are going to be offended over being molded into a better person you will have a very difficult time here. If people turning you into a better version of yourself is seen as being unpleasant, you will always be having an unpleasant time here.

As for actually getting into here, a 3.9+ GPA is a great start, from there you should look at the profiles of other admitted classes. You can gauge the scores on the SAT/ ACT you will need for admittance. Extra-curricular activities will be useful in bolstering your application, so I'd recommend getting in on those. Otherwise, just be the best you can be, and if West Point doesn't work out ROTC is just another opportunity towards being an officer.
I am aware. I just already have this frustration recently because i really am passionate about going into the service academy. Everything about it is just amazing, from its strict disciplinarian lifestyle, to its militaristic approach. It is something i desire in life. My grandfather served as an officer from a different country, but he encourages me to try out military service for this country since i really do want to perform well as an officer.

But with my highschool gpa, it seems hopeless. Thats why im planning to work hard in CC so i can prove that i do have what it takes to reach that goal.
 

BTCS/USN

Member
Just a casual observation from what I've read so far on this thread.

Y_D1922, You have a long way to go to achieving your goal in a number of areas. Most of the people I see gaining appointments have excellent academic credentials, excel in athletics, have displayed above average leadership abilities, carry above average SAT / ACT scores and have been maintaining these attributes throughout high school and often into college. You are by your own admission, way behind the curve.

The thing that really stood out for me however was your attitude. You ask for other's opinions but when they give you them you lash out because you don't like the way the answers were delivered. Professional military members don't suffer fools lightly and are notorious for dealing with substandard performers rather harshly and in short order.

Also, if you think you are frustrated now, believe me it only gets worse. It usually starts on Day 1 and goes progressively downhill from there the remainder of your military career.

What would scare me the most is if I had to follow you into a combat situation knowing you aren't able to successfully navigate a forum. Good luck to you in your endeavors but you may want to keep plans M through Z open.
 
If your goal is to be an army officer, then I would encourage you to consider ROTC (you can be part of ROTC while at community college) and also other Senior Military Colleges. You need to consider options aside from USMA which has a very low acceptance rate. Even students who have very high SAT/ACT scores and high GPAs need to have a plan B, C, D and E. It's just the sensible thing to do.

And you may want to consider getting tutoring in English grammar. You last post contained quite a few grammar errors so this tells me that you may need extra instruction in this subject in order to be college ready. My advice - take it or leave it.
 

Y_D1922

Member
Just a casual observation from what I've read so far on this thread.

Y_D1922, You have a long way to go to achieving your goal in a number of areas. Most of the people I see gaining appointments have excellent academic credentials, excel in athletics, have displayed above average leadership abilities, carry above average SAT / ACT scores and have been maintaining these attributes throughout high school and often into college. You are by your own admission, way behind the curve.

The thing that really stood out for me however was your attitude. You ask for other's opinions but when they give you them you lash out because you don't like the way the answers were delivered. Professional military members don't suffer fools lightly and are notorious for dealing with substandard performers rather harshly and in short order.

Also, if you think you are frustrated now, believe me it only gets worse. It usually starts on Day 1 and goes progressively downhill from there the remainder of your military career.

What would scare me the most is if I had to follow you into a combat situation knowing you aren't able to successfully navigate a forum. Good luck to you in your endeavors but you may want to keep plans M through Z open.
I see your point. I am aware that ROTC produces the same result as any USMA cadet. Either way i am going to work hard and put all my effort into becoming a great officer.

Personally, i am most of the time short tempered and a bit of an over-thinker(taking things personally), which can be very bad when it comes to leading others. I have been trying to look for ways to control my anger such as anger management, working out ect.. I just need to find a way to be assertive without lashing out inappropriately.

Me being in highschool, ive had pleanty of experiences where i tend to feel like someone was going against me,resulting in me becoming ruthless about people. What would you suggest would be the best way to develop those leadership skills for the better? I know i have it, it just tends to come off very agressively.
 
Last edited:

Y_D1922

Member
If your goal is to be an army officer, then I would encourage you to consider ROTC (you can be part of ROTC while at community college) and also other Senior Military Colleges. You need to consider options aside from USMA which has a very low acceptance rate. Even students who have very high SAT/ACT scores and high GPAs need to have a plan B, C, D and E. It's just the sensible thing to do.

And you may want to consider getting tutoring in English grammar. You last post contained quite a few grammar errors so this tells me that you may need extra instruction in this subject in order to be college ready. My advice - take it or leave it.
That is preety much my plan B. I have a set of plans in which will give me the same outcome, just different ways. My original plan is obviously what i mentioned about USMA, my backup plan is ROTC for 4 years while getting a business administration degree (first 2 years at community college and then 2 years at a State university). And in my third option, im not quite sure. I was also considering Virginia Military Institute, as i still admire it for its lifestyle. Would it be possible to do ROTC for 1-2 years at my community college, and transfer to VMI for its ROTC program and finish it there?

And i am trying my best learning to perfect my English, i have been perfecting Spanish and French on my free time, so i think it will help. Thank you for the honest answer. :)
 
Last edited:

BTCS/USN

Member
I see your point. I am aware that ROTC produces the same result as any USMA cadet. Either way i am going t work hard and put all my effort into becoming a great officer.

Personally, i am most of the time short tempered and a bit of an over-thinker(taking things personally), which can be very bad when it comes to leading others. I have been trying to look for ways to control my anger such as anger management, working out ect.. I just need to find a way to be assertive without lashing out inappropriately.

Me being in highschool, ive had pleanty of experiences where i tend to feel like someone was going against me,resulting in me becoming ruthless about people. What would you suggest would be the best way to develop those leadership skills for the better? I know i have it, it just tends to come off very agressively.

I am not sure how to go about answering these questions but what I am willing to do is share my experience of what works and what didn't over a career in the military. Now for full disclosure seeing that you're currently in high school and may not be fully up to speed on the military, I am or rather was a senior enlisted member of the military and not part of the officer community. With that said, what I am going to say more than likely applies throughout the ranks from E1 through O-10. If I get something wrong, I'm sure I'll be corrected.

"Personally, i am most of the time short tempered and a bit of an over-thinker(taking things personally), which can be very bad when it comes to leading others. I have been trying to look for ways to control my anger such as anger management, working out ect.. I just need to find a way to be assertive without lashing out inappropriately."

Being short tempered and taking things personally are emotions. They have no place in leadership roles and most importantly in combat situations. Keep in mind, combat is a viable option given the career path your are striving for. Logic and reason works, emotions don't. Figure out how to eliminate emotion from your professional life or you will probably fail.

"I just need to find a way to be assertive without lashing out inappropriately."


No, you need to know when to be assertive if required and lashing out is always inappropriate. It's also detrimental to good order.

"Me being in highschool, ive had pleanty of experiences where i tend to feel like someone was going against me,resulting in me becoming ruthless about people."

If you feel like people are against you and it results in you becoming ruthless about people, then I would call that developing a chip on your shoulder that is going to cloud your thinking in everything that follows when dealing with people. Lose the chip. 'Nuff said on that.

"What would you suggest would be the best way to develop those leadership skills for the better? I know i have it, it just tends to come off very agressively"

Lose the aggression. First of all, it doesn't impress anyone but you and it turns people off instantly to anything further you may have to contribute to any conversation.

OK, now, as Paul Harvey would say, the rest of the story:

There is no thing as a natural born leader. There may be people that tend to have traits of leaders but they're still learned traits and they are always learning and adjusting along the way.

In order to lead you must first and foremost learn how to follow.

Where ever you are in the food chain you always have someone that you answer to. You are a piece of the machinery, not the machine.

Service before Self. It's not about you. You don't count. The mission counts. The team counts. The goals of the team count. Your brothers and sisters in arms count. You are just there to do what you can to help them achieve their goals to achieve the best results to achieve the mission.

Be aware of your audience. Whether your dealing with superiors, subordinates or peers, know who you're dealing with and speak and act to achieve the best results to make the mission goals achievable. Mission is paramount.

Listen to the advice of the people who have been doing this longer than you. Your superior officers didn't get where they are by being idiots and lucky. They got there by learning how the real world works and applied those lessons. Your senior subordinates didn't get where they are by being idiots and lucky either. They probably applied the same lessons.

Listen to those who went before you and have experienced things that you have not yet faced. Their knowledge is golden.

Make your goal in life doing what you can to help your brothers and sisters to accomplish their goals. That's your one and only job.

Do Not, I repeat, Do Not, alienate your comrade in arms either above you or below you in the rank structure. Either direction can cause you to be deemed useless at the drop of a hat.

Always do what you can to advance the goals of the unit. Always and I do mean Always, cover your "brothers" six. Always stay true to the mission. And Always remember that it's not about YOU, it's about the goals of the organization.

That's just a small part of what I found leadership to be. Take it for what it's worth.

Most importantly.......Stay Humble.
 
Last edited:

BTCS/USN

Member
BTW, Y_D1922, When I said know your audience, some of the people on these forums are retired officers, current officers, retired enlisted, current enlisted, civilians with no military background, civilians with extensive military background, parents, grandparents and probably a lot of people that will be making decisions on your future in regards to advancing in the military. May also be the people that have your life in their hands if you manage to get an appointment to a SA. Just saying :)... Good luck and have a great day.
 
Last edited:
Top