I have no military background

USNAChrisKim

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In my case, I have no eagle scout or military background. But here's what I have.


Varsity Indoor Track Captain
Varsity Outdoor Track Captain
FCA Leader
Church Youth Council
Church grade president
GMCYO (prive orchestra, we go to third world countries on relief efforts and performances for hte unfortunate) 1st violin, leader
Key Club Co-chair
School Orchestra 1st violin, 2nd principal blabla i should be concert master ...
TaeKwonDo 1st degree class leader
rec team soccer captain (when I was little kid)
and middle school concermaster

umm I probably forgetting something.. but yes, Those are my leadership positions, and although I've never done jrotc or whanot, I've had my share of learning how to become a leader.

"To lead, you must first serve"
 

aznarkarus

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I see no point in this thread. If you are looking for an approval from someone who will look at your resume and say that your current leadership positions are substantial for your lack of military experience, then I doubt you will get many responses.
 

aznarkarus

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PS: I apologize if I came off a bit harsh; I just truly resent reading all those threads about whether the OP is good enough or not (especially those chance me threads). I know you are trying to be modest but arrogance is not too far off.

Anyway, back to your post. IMO, nobody has any military background unless they're transfering directly from the fleet. I wouldn't consider CAP or JROTC either--it's simply a preparation for that experience.
 

USNAChrisKim

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hahaha no it's fine I totally forgot to ask the question


Does the naval academy value like eagle scouts and stuff over other only normal leadership positions?
 

Luigi59

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Eagle scout is equal to varsity team captain.

Both are examples of demonstrated leadership.
 

NativeTexan

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Why not try looking at the USNA profile on the USNA admissions site rather than posting all this Do I have a chance. I am sure you can figure out what USNA is looking for.

You keep posting you stats in many different threads.... maybe enough is enough

http://www.usna.edu/Catalog/Dialup/2007-2008introduction.pdf
page 12

Profile of Midshipmen
It takes a special kind of young man or woman to handle the Naval Academy’s demanding program, but that doesn’t mean all midshipmen are alike. Midshipmen come from all 50 states, U.S. territories and several foreign countries. They have roots in cities, suburbs, farms and ranches, small towns and military bases. They have talents and hobbies of every kind and personalities that fi t every description, and they represent the diverse ethnic and cultural heritages that, together, make the United States a great nation. Some characteristics seem to be common among Naval Academy midshipmen, however. The charts on these pages show you that midshipmen are good students, leaders in their high schools and communities and participants in competitive sports. But other common qualities of midshipmen don’t show up in statistics. The young men and women who choose the Naval Academy are looking for more than a college degree. They like the idea of being challenged mentally, physically and morally. They are people who don’t want to settle for the ordinary, the routine or the easy.
Midshipmen also want to serve their country in a meaningful way—in a profession that helps preserve our nation’s freedoms.

Finally, midshipmen are young people who look to the future. They look forward to the challenging Naval Academy program, as well as the opportunities open to them in the Navy and Marine Corps after graduation.

CLASS OF 2011 PROFILE
Applicants and Nominees
Applicants (includes nominees) ................12,003
Number of applicants with an
official nomination ..................................3,827
Nominees qualifi ed scholastically,
medically and in physical aptitude ..........1,893
Offers of admission ....................................1,448
Admitted ....................................................1,202

Combined Scholastic Assessment Test I (SAT-1) and
American College Testing (ACT) Program Scores
Score Range Verbal Math
>700 (31-36) 23% 30%
600-699 (26-30) 46% 54%
<600 (<26) 31% 16%

Rank in High School Class
First fifth ..........................................78.0%
Second fifth ......................................15.3%
Third fifth ......................................... 5.1%
Fourth fifth ........................................1.3%
Fifth fifth ........................................... 0.3%

Previous College and Prep School
The Class of 2011 includes 28.3 percent (340) from college
and post-high school preparatory programs which include:
202 from the Naval Academy Preparatory School (NAPS) in
Newport, R.I.; 20 from the Nuclear Power School Program in
Charleston, S.C. (none having previously attended college);
67 from the U.S. Naval Academy Foundation Program; (43
from private preparatory schools and 24 from colleges under
Foundation sponsorship; and 51 additional students have
completed at least six months of study at a college or university
(43), or a private preparatory school (8).

Military Background
The Class of 2011 includes 86 midshipmen who previously served
as enlisted members of the Navy (63) or Marine Corps (23).
This fi gure includes 16 who entered directly from Fleet Service
(12 USN, 4 USMC), 20 from Nuclear Power School and
50 from NAPS (31 USN, 19 USMC).

Geographical Distribution
Midshipmen were admitted from every state in the nation, as
well as Washington, D.C., and Guam. The Class of 2011 also
includes nine international students from the following countries:
Albania, Azerbaijan, Belize, Federated States of Micronesia,
Lithuania, Madagascar, Singapore, and Tunisia (2).

School Honors and Activities
Student body/council/government
president or vice president ........................... 8.3%
Class president or vice president ..................... 11.6%
School club president or vice president ........... 35.2%
School publication staff .................................. 22.7%
National Honor Society ................................. 62.0%
Varsity athletics .............................................. 90.9%
Varsity letter winner ....................................... 84.2%
Dramatics, public speaking, debating ............. 88.4%
Eagle Scout/Gold Award ................................ 11.0%
Boys/Girls State or Nation ..............................15.5%
Reserve Offi cer Training Program .................... 13.7%
Sea Cadets ........................................................ 3.0%

Minorities and Women
The Class of 2011 includes 24.2% (291) minority midshipmen
with ethnic backgrounds as follows: African American (60),
Hispanic (132), Asian American (62), Native American (28)
and Hawaiian/Pacifi c Islanders (9).
The Class of 2011 includes 20.9% (251) women.

Sons and Daughters of Alumni
The Class of 2011 includes 55 sons and 16 daughters of Naval
Academy alumni (5.9 percent of the class). One is the daughter
of a female Naval Academy graduate (0.08 percent).
 

Zaphod

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You are hardly alone in not having any military experience when applying. Don't sweat it.
 

usna1985

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USNA doesn't expect candidates to have prior military "experience."

In terms of leadership, it's not just having the position, it's what you do with it. I typically ask my candidates to tell me what they've done as team captain, club president, etc. If an Eagle Scout, I ask about their project. Anyone can be in a position of leadership -- the question is whether or not they have done anything TO LEAD.

Examples of things that require leadership -- organizing fundraisers, setting up a new communithy outreach program, increasing membership, developing training schedules, and on and on. In fact, you can be just a "member" of a club and still be a leader. You can be active in only one activity and be a major leader.

Those of you not yet seniors, think about things you can do, not just positions you can hold. Consider how you can make an organization larger, better, more effective, etc. That's how you lead.
 

kaullman

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They are Looking for Leadership

I agree with Zaphod and USNA1985 whole heartedly. It is what you do with the leadership that counts.

I disagree with Luigi in that Eagle Scout shows unique perseverance, especially in that there is less and less peer support as one gets older. It shows different things than being a varsity team captain. The admissions board is looking for someone who is in for the four-year marathon that is the SA.

CDR, USN (ret), BGO, Dad of USNA 2007
 
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