Interview observation from a former Army ROTC Professor of Military Science

Status
Not open for further replies.

AROTCPMS

Former Army ROTC PMS for Claremont McKenna and USC
Banned
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
118
Hi All,

After spending six years as a PMS at two separate Army ROTC programs (Claremont McKenna College and the University of Southern California), I conducted well over 200 PMS interviews. In advising people who come to me now for advice, they ask me what the number one thing to do is in order to be successful in the interview. [note that this question also is applicable to Academy interviews].

I tell them the most surprising thing for me is how little interviewees know about the ROTC, the Service, and what life will be like as a lieutenant (or ensign). Simple questions I posed such as: Do you know what life will be like as an ROTC cadet? (or) What branch or specialty do you want to serve in? –-was often met with silence, a blank stare, or an answer which showed their lack of knowledge.

So how do you prevent this from happening to you in your future interview?

Some tips:

--Visit your local ROTC program well before you interview. Talk to cadre and students who are in the ROTC program. (this helps you answer the interview question about how much you know about ROTC)

--Do your due diligence and research what lieutenants or ensigns do in the Service and what the various officer specialties are. The Services websites are great for this and often have videos which you can view on the subject.

--Visit a local National Guard or Reserve unit. “Shadow” a junior officer for a few hours on a drill weekend. Ask questions about what life is like as an officer and what officers do.

--Talk to a serving junior officer in the Service you are interested in.

If you become educated and knowledge and do your due diligence, it tells the interviewer that you are serious about becoming an officer. Tell your interviewer what you did to become educated. It will impress him or her. You then become the 5% of interview candidates who have adequately prepared in this regard.

There are many more tips that come to mind for me but this one is probably at the top of the list….

Good luck on your future ROTC (and Academy) interviews.


Robert Kirkland, LTC (Ret)
"The Insider's Guide to the Army [and Air Force] ROTC Scholarship for High School Students and their Parents" (Amazon)
 
Last edited:

MidCakePa

DD USNA OORAH! / DS ROTC HOOAH!
Joined
May 22, 2018
Messages
4,239
Outstanding post, @AROTCPMS. Thank you for these well-informed words of wisdom.

To the moderators: Would be great to cross-post this (is that the term?) on each SA thread of SAF. Sage advice that applies beyond AROTC.
 

HawkParent

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Messages
10
Really great advice. Many tips that I have never thought of. Will pass on to my son who is applying!
 

HawkParent

Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Messages
10
Really great advice. Many tips that I have never thought of. Will pass on to my son who is applying!
I find it interesting that many people interviewed don't know anything about the Service they are applying to. It seems that if you do your basic research you are already ahead of the game.
 

tasharose97

New Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Messages
6
Hi All,

After spending six years as a PMS at two separate Army ROTC programs (Claremont McKenna College and the University of Southern California), I conducted well over 200 PMS interviews. In advising people who come to me now for advice, they ask me what the number one thing to do is in order to be successful in the interview. [note that this question also is applicable to Academy interviews].

I tell them the most surprising thing for me is how little interviewees know about the ROTC, the Service, and what life will be like as a lieutenant (or ensign). Simple questions I posed such as: Do you know what life will be like as an ROTC cadet? (or) What branch or specialty do you want to serve in? –-was often met with silence, a blank stare, or an answer which showed their lack of knowledge.

So how do you prevent this from happening to you in your future interview?

Some tips:

--Visit your local ROTC program well before you interview. Talk to cadre and students who are in the ROTC program. (this helps you answer the interview question about how much you know about ROTC)

--Do your due diligence and research what lieutenants or ensigns do in the Service and what the various officer specialties are. The Services websites are great for this and often have videos which you can view on the subject.

--Visit a local National Guard or Reserve unit. “Shadow” a junior officer for a few hours on a drill weekend. Ask questions about what life is like as an officer and what officers do.

--Talk to a serving junior officer in the Service you are interested in.

If you become educated and knowledge and do your due diligence, it tells the interviewer that you are serious about becoming an officer. Tell your interviewer what you did to become educated. It will impress him or her. You then become the 5% of interview candidates who have adequately prepared in this regard.

There are many more tips that come to mind for me but this one is probably at the top of the list….

Good luck on your future ROTC (and Academy) interviews.


Robert Kirkland, LTC (Ret)
"The Insider's Guide to the Army [and Air Force] ROTC Scholarship for High School Students and their Parents" (Amazon)

i am very anxious to know these answers as I would lay down my LIFE for my country and would be HONORED to serve. I have made mistakes in the past have vowed to never repeat them. um, i also scored a 97 on the asvab if for some reason that would help my case
1.) can you join the army if you have done lsd- not abused it but used it twice?
2.) how long do records stay at MEPS?
3.) can you join the army or the army rotc if you have been kicked out of the marine corps dep?
4.) will another branch know if you confessed to doing drugs at meps but never tested positive?
 

jlevy129

Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2020
Messages
58
Hi All,

After spending six years as a PMS at two separate Army ROTC programs (Claremont McKenna College and the University of Southern California), I conducted well over 200 PMS interviews. In advising people who come to me now for advice, they ask me what the number one thing to do is in order to be successful in the interview. [note that this question also is applicable to Academy interviews].

I tell them the most surprising thing for me is how little interviewees know about the ROTC, the Service, and what life will be like as a lieutenant (or ensign). Simple questions I posed such as: Do you know what life will be like as an ROTC cadet? (or) What branch or specialty do you want to serve in? –-was often met with silence, a blank stare, or an answer which showed their lack of knowledge.

So how do you prevent this from happening to you in your future interview?

Some tips:

--Visit your local ROTC program well before you interview. Talk to cadre and students who are in the ROTC program. (this helps you answer the interview question about how much you know about ROTC)

--Do your due diligence and research what lieutenants or ensigns do in the Service and what the various officer specialties are. The Services websites are great for this and often have videos which you can view on the subject.

--Visit a local National Guard or Reserve unit. “Shadow” a junior officer for a few hours on a drill weekend. Ask questions about what life is like as an officer and what officers do.

--Talk to a serving junior officer in the Service you are interested in.

If you become educated and knowledge and do your due diligence, it tells the interviewer that you are serious about becoming an officer. Tell your interviewer what you did to become educated. It will impress him or her. You then become the 5% of interview candidates who have adequately prepared in this regard.

There are many more tips that come to mind for me but this one is probably at the top of the list….

Good luck on your future ROTC (and Academy) interviews.


Robert Kirkland, LTC (Ret)
"The Insider's Guide to the Army [and Air Force] ROTC Scholarship for High School Students and their Parents" (Amazon)

I just really want to know why this poster was banned 😳
 

Torero_dad

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
228
I've not read the terms of use (shocking, I know), but this same post or a close variant, is posted with regularity. Recently original poster began writing about a new podcast he is creating. I think this regular self-promotion was tolerated but attempts to siphon readership to a new channel of media is in a different class.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2018
Messages
680
He’s charging kids/naive parents for “expert” advice that they can get for free on here or by simply calling a ROO. A great interview isn't going to overcome no sports no leadership and crummy test scores. I’ve seen nearly 1000 interviews and there is no difference between a 180 (good candidate) and 200. Some PMS’s are santa clause and some are grinches. It takes 3 years in HS to build a winning 4yr scholarship packet or SA packet.
 

jlevy129

Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2020
Messages
58
He’s charging kids/naive parents for “expert” advice that they can get for free on here or by simply calling a ROO. A great interview isn't going to overcome no sports no leadership and crummy test scores. I’ve seen nearly 1000 interviews and there is no difference between a 180 (good candidate) and 200. Some PMS’s are santa clause and some are grinches. It takes 3 years in HS to build a winning 4yr scholarship packet or SA packet.
Excellent points! I’m so thankful for all the knowledge shared here. I’m hopeful my son, who will be a freshman I high school next year, can benefit from all the “free” info I’ve come across.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top