Legacy Impact

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by willp2022, Jan 16, 2018.

  1. willp2022

    willp2022 Member

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    Hello everyone, currently I'm in the process of applying to the class of 2022. I want to follow in my father's footsteps and become a career officer. I've noticed at many civilian schools that having a parent graduate from that college gives the applicant a bump in the admissions process. My father graduated from West Point in the class of 91 and served for 23 years. Will the admissions team take this into consideration? I'm sure many other candidates have also been inquiring about this.
     
  2. Tex232

    Tex232 Member

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    It’s usually not an overriding factor for any application that isn’t otherwise strong, but since your dad atteneded West Point AND made a career of the Army, it definitely won’t hurt you. I do remember one kid from my high school class getting accepted to USAFA, who in my opinion was just an average guy, but his dad had been a pilot and career officer in the Air Force. I often believe that he got in just due to that fact. I was always under the impression the Air Force cared a little more than the other services about your family background/service. And after being on active duty for a while now I see I was mostly correct. Having not been in the Army I can’t say for certain, but as the son of a former Army Officer I was also under the impression the Army cares less about where you’re from and more about your leadership potential (which is probably a good thing). Since the Army is a bigger service, the family roots don’t seem to matter as much (unless of course you’re a direct descendant of Patton or MacArthur ).
     
  3. willp2022

    willp2022 Member

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    Thank you Tex232 for your response. I also know one of those kids at my high school. The waiting game is killing me but I know there's nothing I can do in the meantime.
     
  4. Casey

    Casey USMA 2015 5-Year Member

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    Check out the discussion in the thread listed below for some more comments on this, but this is what I posted recently in regards to this question:


    https://www.serviceacademyforums.co...to-sa-versus-no-ties.59067/page-2#post-583436



    That said, us Army brats have to stick together. Good luck!
     
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  5. davejean90

    davejean90 Member

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    The biggest reason why legacy candidates are admitted at most civilian colleges is because the college feels there is a greater chance that the legacy parents will contribute more money if the legacy child is admitted. In the case of West Point, most of the fund raising is done by the Association of Graduates (AOG) which has a more distant relationship from admissions then a typical college. Other than the involvement of the AOG scholarship, AOG has very little to no influence on who is admitted. Also private civilian colleges list high rates of tuition that most students do not pay. A "legacy" admit may find financial aid difficult to find and be forced to pay the full tuition rate. USMA has no tuition, so that game is not in play. The biggest advantage a legacy candidate to West Point has is the genetics that have been passed down. If the same qualities that got the parent in are passed down to the child then you have an advantage. There may also be an advantage in understanding the "language" of the military or a better understanding of the admissions process.
     
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  6. time2

    time2 10-Year Member

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    No one on this forum works in USMA admissions, so all you get are opinions and hunches each time this topic gets discussed. The best answer any of us can give is 'we don't know'.
     
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  7. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    The primary reason that legacy has little objective impact is that USMA is funded by federal tax dollars. It is too politically sensitive to create a system that gives advantage to legacies.

    However, children of career military personnel do have an advantage in obtaining nominations.
     
  8. USMA 1994

    USMA 1994 Member

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    @Casey is correct. We do know that having a parent that graduated from the Military Academy will not ensure you an appointment. You MAY (this is what no one is 100% sure of) get a few extra WCS points if your parents are a grad.

    You still have to go through the process of obtaining a nomination and getting qualified. Once qualified, you must still win a nomination slate, be in the first 150 of the NWL or be chosen as an Additional Appointee.

    I know of three other classmates beside my own daughter who were not admitted to the class of 2020. Two are now members of 2021 and the other two decided their Plan B was now Plan A.
     
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  9. buff81

    buff81 Moderator 10-Year Member

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    No WCS points are given to legacies.