Med School after ROTC

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by senior2k17, Oct 9, 2017.

  1. senior2k17

    senior2k17 Member

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    Hello, I know there are a lot of threads on this but when I graduate college and ROTC, I will be a 2nd LT. But if I get edu delay and go to med school, how does the ranking works? Will I still be a 2nd LT the entire 4 year too? And will I still train with the ROTC unit at that particular med school then?
     
  2. AROTC Parent

    AROTC Parent 5-Year Member

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    For Army:
    If you are selected for an educational delay you will be a 2LT in the Reserves for the four years of medical school. You will not drill as a Reservist if you are on Educational Delay. You will have no significant relationship with any ROTC unit while in medical school. Administratively they may have your records, have you weigh in, and do a PT test though generally a local medical recruiting office handles the administration.

    If on HPSP - you will have four periods of Active Duty Training (4 or 6 weeks?) while in medical school. Non HPSP (self pay) are also authorized four ADT's. Generally one of those you remain at school to study for Step 1 or the Osteopathic version of Step 1. These are called 'school orders'. You get paid as a 2LT during these ADT's.

    The other three are likely rotating at a military hospital as a medical student. The last ADT, though sometimes the last two, are considered 'audition' rotations during which you will essentially have a month long audition for a medical residency that follows medical school. The only other requirement for ROTC graduates on Ed Delay is to attend AMEDD BOLC.

    Military obligated medical students re-commission as a Medical Corps Captain when they graduate.

    Attending medical school while in the Reserves or NG, not on Ed Delay, is different than described above.

    A word of caution - Medical School is difficult to get into. A small percent of pre medical students continue to medical school. AROTC will be a distraction. Be prepared to commission in FA, AG, QM, CM, IN, FI, ...
     
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  3. buff81

    buff81 Moderator 10-Year Member

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    @AROTC Parent - is it less difficult for an officer to be accepted to USUHS than to a civilian med school?
     
  4. AROTC Parent

    AROTC Parent 5-Year Member

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    No medical school is a sure bet for acceptance. Every year some competitive applicants are not accepted at any medical school. No acceptance to a medical school, if on an Ed Delay from Army, they are accessed in another branch (MS, QM, AG, MI....).

    USUHS publishes their class composition annually - I found these two quickly Class of 2017 and Class of 2019

    @buff81 My opinion is that overall it is more difficult to get into USUHS than to a civilian med school. It's a result of small numbers and that it is an Allopathic (MD) school. There are roughly 65 Army, 50 AF, 50 Navy, and 2 PHS slots at USUHS each year. Some of the Army, Navy/Marine, and AF slots now go to EMDP2 (Enlisted to Medical Program) applicants further lowering the number of slots for applicants off the street - It's a great program for enlisted applicants on AD and competitive.

    Like any medical school though USUHS has a stated mission - theirs is the only one that includes military medical practice and supports military readiness. Most ROTC or Academy graduates align with the mission.

    An acceptance to an Osteopathic (DO) school is significantly less difficult, but not easy, as their average numbers (MCAT, cGPA, sGPA, EC's) for acceptance are lower than most MD schools.

    An acceptance to any medical school (MD or DO) is not straight numbers (MCAT, cGPA, sGPA, EC's). Apply broadly to both MD and DO, interview well, align with their mission, and hope for the best.

    The AD service commitment from ROTC and USUHS is long. With no delays in education and the shortest medical residency (3 years), applicants are finished with their commitment at age 40. That's tough considering the first contract is signed at age 18.