Medical Separation: Deciding Between USMA and ROTC Scholarship - One Additional Consideration

Classof83

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So you are saying that this has nothing to do with a vax or getting covid?

Does not make any sense at all then.

Surely you would think that there must be written policies to follow when it impacts a fourth year student.

Nope. Nothing to do with vaccinations or COVID. As stated earlier, it was a sudden onset of a medical condition.

There is an Army Regulation, AR150-1 which explicitly allows the USMA Superintendent to graduate medically disqualified seniors. In the past, it was usually done. Now, with this "no golden handshake" policy, it usually is not. Why the "no golden handshake" policy? I haven't been given a reason or been able to figure out which problem it is trying to solve, but it is a "thing" according to cadet rumor and statements by the USMA Commandant during the August 2021 graduation.
 

Classof83

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@Classof83,

My honest assessment is that appeals to change the outcome of your young adult's case to allow her to reinstate/ finish/ graduate at WP will be a very likely be as effective as pushing a rope - not a lot of return no matter how hard you push. That being said, I commend you for the efforts taken and wish you the best outcome here. I would do the same thing or try to. I just feel they won't admit they made a hasty or less than optimal decision, and will back the leader even if some are scratching their heads at the choice made privately.

Years ago my application was rejected at one of the largest companies in the world. My recruiter gave me the news, and my response was "please politely tell them I reject their rejection and I'd like 5 minutes on the phone with the hiring manager." I honestly felt I could do the job well. and had the right background, experience, tools. Reluctantly he did, which reportedly brought much laughter to the hiring team. Well, a few of those hiring managers were mocking me at the water cooler at corporate HQ - what a baffoon etc. , and a very senior person, a household name actually - heard it, and gave me five minutes, noting I sounded hungry and like I wanted to be there, flew me out for an interview after that, and I got hired. My point being is odds be d*mned you should still try. I'm just trying to balance that and the message of not keeping on with CPRing with all energy in what i see as an already coded patient.

I do hope you recognize that abrupt separation from any band of brothers group you are close with is brutal - be it the military, classmates you bonded with while at WP, a college women's soccer or football team after an injury, even a corporation you've worked at for 20 years then were laid off after a merger or whatever. Any group you are in the soup with on an athletic field, hot zone, operating theater, theater of combat, etc. It's a sudden loss, and you should continue to support your young adult through this transition, but if I can suggest while CPRing at WP, if you aren't already, also put some of your energy now, 20% IDK, into her path forward- her next school, a transition plan on where to work or rehab as needed to return to optimal shape, etc. her applications, letters of reference, a course plan on what she'll need to take to graduate, internship opportunities, a semester abroad to clear her head and the passport/ funds she'll need, options to get into school this spring or summer. I hope sharing this helps you and your young adult on your journey.

Best of luck as you sort through this and please keep the board posted - I wish I knew how to better help but maybe different viewpoints will help in some small ways.
Great advice, Herman_Snead. Yes, it has felt like pushing on a rope (or string). We were 80%/20% on trying to get a reinstatement vs moving forward now the score is1%/99% (with the 1% representing an appeal up the chain above WP). Probably a better chance of watercoolersnickering than someone who is a household name getting back to us.
 

OldRetSWO

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Great advice, Herman_Snead. Yes, it has felt like pushing on a rope (or string). We were 80%/20% on trying to get a reinstatement vs moving forward now the score is1%/99% (with the 1% representing an appeal up the chain above WP). Probably a better chance of watercoolersnickering than someone who is a household name getting back to us.
You have one potentially strong tool in your box that many other would not and that is your personal network amongst fellow grads. Surely someone who you worked for, roomed with, deployed with, etc knows someone who is on a first name basis with either the Supe or someone like Jack Reed "71". Normally, I'd recommend a member of the Board of Visitors but right now, that is just Senators/Reps and that might be hit/miss other than folks in your grad network.
That is how I'd play it at this point where things have moved well down the path already.
 

Humey

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Both the academies and Rotc can screw you over. I have no idea what USAFA would have done with your son's issues but let's same they would have done the same. Yes if your son had been in AFRotc he would have graduated even if he was kicked out of Rotc. On the other hand, AFROTC hands out 4 year National Scholarships every year and what most people assume is that if you fulfill all the requirements as required, you will commission. What is not really talked about although it is included in the contract you sign, is that all cadets regardless of scholarship status must be invited to Field training (summer between 2nd and 3rd year) in order to continue with AFRotc and therefore continue receiving their scholarship. Last year 50% of the cadets were not invited to Field Traning. That means a huge number of kids lost their scholarships for the 3rd and 4th year of college. So while sure, they can stay at the college, they may no longer be able to afford to stay there. There were kids who got scholastic scholarships at college #1 and an AFROTC scholarship at College #2 and choose #2 because they assumed the scholarship was good for 4 years and it was their preferred school and only affordable through Rotc. They too were screwed although money becomes the only issue I am not attacking either institution, but to let you know that there are no guarantees even if you do everything right.
 

Classof83

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Both the academies and Rotc can screw you over. I have no idea what USAFA would have done with your son's issues but let's same they would have done the same. Yes if your son had been in AFRotc he would have graduated even if he was kicked out of Rotc. On the other hand, AFROTC hands out 4 year National Scholarships every year and what most people assume is that if you fulfill all the requirements as required, you will commission. What is not really talked about although it is included in the contract you sign, is that all cadets regardless of scholarship status must be invited to Field training (summer between 2nd and 3rd year) in order to continue with AFRotc and therefore continue receiving their scholarship. Last year 50% of the cadets were not invited to Field Traning. That means a huge number of kids lost their scholarships for the 3rd and 4th year of college. So while sure, they can stay at the college, they may no longer be able to afford to stay there. There were kids who got scholastic scholarships at college #1 and an AFROTC scholarship at College #2 and choose #2 because they assumed the scholarship was good for 4 years and it was their preferred school and only affordable through Rotc. They too were screwed although money becomes the only issue I am not attacking either institution, but to let you know that there are no guarantees even if you do everything right.
Humey, sorry about the delay in my reply.

I think I remember hearing about the drastic reduction in AFROTC cadets invited to summer training. I'm definitely not in favor of the knee-jerk reaction and poor planning associated with drastic force changes that don't look beyond the current threat assessment, and the associated costs that come with dramatic up-scaling and drawdowns (example: bonuses to go active and early retirement incentives).

As you mention, the invitation to ROTC field training comes between the 2nd and 3rd year. That makes the academy situation different. After that summer at one of the academies, if a cadet hasn't resigned or been separated for deficiency in the academic, military and/or physical category (and every class loses between 100-200 cadets to these circumstances) before this point, they are "invited" to affirm and if they do that, they incur an obligation of 10 years (remaining time at the academy and eight years of active and inactive service). My cadet was far beyond this point and had completed the last year of summer military training. Again, according to tradition and recent practice, a medical disqualification during the senior year, before the current command's "No Golden Handshake" policy, would have allowed for graduation. Had the separation occurred in the first two years, before academic major classes had begun, my cadet was advised by a straight-talking counselor at one of the competitive (low freshman acceptance rates) universities that transferring to a competitive university would have been much easier had two or more years remained until completion of the bachelor's degree. This is due to the tuition and fees the university would have earned combined with the time being spent at the university and the impression the university's culture would have made on the person transferring. In a nutshell, competitive universities were not interested in a cadet who only had a year of time remaining until graduation. That would not be enough time to "imbue" the graduate with the traditions and values of the university.

It's true, that a ROTC student who is not invited to field training may not have the funds necessary to stay at an expensive competitive university. I would imagine, however, that the university would endeavor to keep an admitted student in that case and help with additional financial aid. But if not, they would certainly be welcomed at other universities given that two years remained until the bachelor's degree and the student had not even begun their academic major.

With the new "No Golden Handshake" policy, one might imagine that the command at USMA would be amenable to offering assistance in transferring to another university to medically disqualified seniors. As already mentioned, my cadet was told four days after the initial diagnosis that they would be separated and not one finger has been lifted to assist my cadet transfer. Never mind that a classmate of mine consulted an Army JAG General Officer on this case, who said that my cadet "was not being given due process," I am under the impression that the command views helping transfer to competitive universities medically disqualified senior cadets who are separated may counter the overall objective of the "No Golden Handshake" policy which is to provide a disincentive to cadets seeking a medical disqualification and not commissioning and thus avoiding their obligation. Excuse my optimism, but I don't believe there are many cadets who are seeking to graduate and not commission, and certainly, this is not the case in my cadet's situation given the commissioning disqualification is due the diagnosis of chronic and lifelong medical condition.
 

parentalunit2

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I truly empathize with your situation and cannot imagine your family’s shock and disappointment. Thank you for posting this, as a cautionary tale to anyone reading this thread in the future. As I’m sure you know, golden handshakes were not a thing at WP in the mid-80s, then they became a thing, but in this scenario it appears that it is not being granted. But one item I am not fully grasping is exactly what type of assistance you expect from USMA in helping your daughter transfer to another university. Other than providing any requested transcripts, what is it you are looking for in the way of assistance from the academy? Gaining admittance to any other program/university would be up to the student.
 

Classof83

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I truly empathize with your situation and cannot imagine your family’s shock and disappointment. Thank you for posting this, as a cautionary tale to anyone reading this thread in the future. As I’m sure you know, golden handshakes were not a thing at WP in the mid-80s, then they became a thing, but in this scenario it appears that it is not being granted. But one item I am not fully grasping is exactly what type of assistance you expect from USMA in helping your daughter transfer to another university. Other than providing any requested transcripts, what is it you are looking for in the way of assistance from the academy? Gaining admittance to any other program/university would be up to the student.
Parentalunit2, thanks, and great question!

It is common for universities to have articulation agreements with each other for a wide-range of circumstances. If the practice of immediately separating (within days) medically disqualified senior cadets (some in the semester before graduation) endures post the current command (and I'm not sure that it will if my U.S. Senator's reaction is any indication of how other MOCs will react when their appointees are removed under similar circumstances), simply having agreements which have laid the foundation for transferring to a handful of willing selective universities would provide the option for these cadets to complete their education without having to endure significant (perhaps years) delays.

Having just recently attended a conference of leaders of higher education, anyone who heard this story (again, a few were "old" grads) was aghast at the treatment of a medically disqualified senior at West Point. It certainly did not present West Point in a positive light. Many offered their assistance but mentioned the impediments of having a cadet transfer to their university for just the last year. Coincidentally, Just this week, another prominent West Point alumnus expressed, in their opinion, disappointment with the options open to my cadet. It was felt that the options available, in his opinion, were not commensurate with the institutional level of West Point. I agree.

Having articulation agreements in place at two or three selective universities and in several programs could overcome the impediments and would certainly soften the impact of being separated from West Point under circumstances beyond the senior cadet's control. The institutions, with agreements in place, would simply evaluate the cadet's record and recommend an appropriate program. This wouldn't have to be invented, on a cadet by cadet basis, by an admissions officer. This would be an agreement negotiated by the leaders of the institutions. As mentioned, these leaders in higher education, at least those at the conference, are willing to do this, but it would be best approached from an institution to institution level by leadership and not on a case by case basis at the admissions officer level.

This will not help my cadet. But perhaps it will assist the unfortunate cadets who follow. In my cadet's circumstance, the command, from the top to the bottom of the command, once the medical condition was discovered, did not waste one word of empathy or compassion on one of the soldiers in their command who had just developed a lifelong medical condition (this is the leadership demonstrated by the world's leading military academy?). If the "No Golden Handshake" policy is institutionalized beyond this command, the articulation agreements would only help the medically separated cadets land on their feet at another institution. It really wouldn't take much effort by the academic administration at West Point to do this. As stated in my previous post, while it seems counter to logic, there may be hesitancy as some could believe this would serve as an inducement to present a medical disqualification. I don't believe this would be the case but can't think of any other reasons why there are no articulation agreement in place other than a lack of imagination and willingness to do it.

In reference to "As I’m sure you know, golden handshakes were not a thing at WP in the mid-80s, then they became a thing," I remember a classmate who, weeks before graduation delayed seeking medical attention because he was afraid of being separated. Post graduation and commissioning, he sought medical attention. It was too late. He died. It's amazing what cadets will do, after four years of West Point, to graduate. Perhaps that's why the "No Golden Handshake" policy "became a thing" of the past. Until now.
 
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Classof83

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Both the academies and Rotc can screw you over. I have no idea what USAFA would have done with your son's issues but let's same they would have done the same. Yes if your son had been in AFRotc he would have graduated even if he was kicked out of Rotc. On the other hand, AFROTC hands out 4 year National Scholarships every year and what most people assume is that if you fulfill all the requirements as required, you will commission. What is not really talked about although it is included in the contract you sign, is that all cadets regardless of scholarship status must be invited to Field training (summer between 2nd and 3rd year) in order to continue with AFRotc and therefore continue receiving their scholarship. Last year 50% of the cadets were not invited to Field Traning. That means a huge number of kids lost their scholarships for the 3rd and 4th year of college. So while sure, they can stay at the college, they may no longer be able to afford to stay there. There were kids who got scholastic scholarships at college #1 and an AFROTC scholarship at College #2 and choose #2 because they assumed the scholarship was good for 4 years and it was their preferred school and only affordable through Rotc. They too were screwed although money becomes the only issue I am not attacking either institution, but to let you know that there are no guarantees even if you do everything right.
Humey, It was USAFA that recently allowed a cadet with the same medical condition (by all accounts worse) as my cadet's to graduate and commission ("I have no idea what USAFA would have done with your son's issues but let's same they would have done the same."), and I agree, these programs (ROTC, academies) don't take into account what students give up to attend their programs ("There were kids who got scholastic scholarships at college #1 and an AFROTC scholarship at College #2 and choose #2 because they assumed the scholarship was good for 4 years").
 

Classof83

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You have one potentially strong tool in your box that many other would not and that is your personal network amongst fellow grads. Surely someone who you worked for, roomed with, deployed with, etc knows someone who is on a first name basis with either the Supe or someone like Jack Reed "71". Normally, I'd recommend a member of the Board of Visitors but right now, that is just Senators/Reps and that might be hit/miss other than folks in your grad network.
That is how I'd play it at this point where things have moved well down the path already.
OldRetSWO, very good advice, but I worked the back channels hard at the beginning with people who are on a "text message basis" with the TOP decision makers. And, as mentioned in my opening post, the WP BOV already brought this to the USMA Superintendent's attention:

"Disenrollment of seniors due to medical disqualification was mentioned at the last meeting of the West Point Board of Visitors in December of 2020. From the minutes of that meeting (https://tinyurl.com/hj8664zd, p. 8), it is recorded that LTG (Ret.) H.R. McMaster asked the question as to whether the current medical waiver process at West Point was, “meeting the standards and not excluding people that may deserve a waiver.” The answer provided unfortunately was vague."

I also contacted a current WP BOV member about the issue. Unfortunately, the fall BOV meeting, which would have been well-timed to address this issue, was cancelled. Perhaps it will be addressed at the March meeting.

This policy is not popular. It's not right. I'd be surprised if it lasts beyond this current command.
 
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Charlene711

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My son is in his second year and will likely be medically separated because of a childhood skin disorder that is no longer even an issue in his life. He had multiple full ride scholarships to other colleges, but he turned them down because he wanted to go to West Point. When applying, my son was up front about this childhood issue and he was still accepted. Only now are they making a big deal of it without any basis. I know that West Point does not hold his future in their hands - ultimately God does. However, my son feels called to military service and as he is a National Merit Scholar, having studied the military and its history since he was a young child, I have difficulty seeing him just joining the regular Army outside of West Point. He's ranked #162 out of 1,180 cadets - top 15%. He's been invited by WP leaders to numerous academic travel activities but he turned them down to pursue a leadership position that would be more helpful for him in a military career. We will know by early March whether they will separate him or not but we are all very frustrated because he does not have any health issues and yet they have made up their mind to end his career with no real basis for doing so. And we have no recourse or say in the matter, despite my son's meeting with numerous people regarding this.
 
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exodus

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My son is in his second year and will likely be medically separated because of a childhood skin disorder that is no longer even an issue in his life. He had multiple full ride scholarships to other colleges, but he turned them down because he wanted to go to West Point. When applying, my son was up front about this childhood issue and he was still accepted. Only now are they making a big deal of it without any basis. I know that West Point does not hold his future in their hands - ultimately God does. However, my son feels called to military service and as he is a National Merit Scholar, having studied the military and its history since he was a young child, I have difficulty seeing him just joining the regular Army outside of West Point. He's ranked #162 out of 1,180 cadets - top 15%. He's been invited by WP leaders to numerous academic travel activities but he turned them down to pursue a leadership position that would be more helpful for him in a military career. We will know by early March whether they will separate him or not but we are all very frustrated because he does not have any health issues and yet they have made up their mind to end his career with no real basis for doing so. And we have no recourse or say in the matter, despite my son's meeting with numerous people regarding this.
this sounds horrible. but what happened to his health? did he recently go to see his doctor regarding the skin condition? just don't understand and afraid this will happen to us down the road?
 

Charlene711

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this sounds horrible. but what happened to his health? did he recently go to see his doctor regarding the skin condition? just don't understand and afraid this will happen to us down the road?
He went to a WP dermatologist about itchy scalp issues. At 3 months old he was diagnosed with a rare skin disorder that went away as a teen. His itchy scalp had nothing to do with anything. Many people have itchy scalp from dandruff or something similar. The dermatologist saw the skin disorder on his record and went up the chain of command, making the proverbial mountain out of a molehill. He has no long-term or even current health issues. Clearly, if it happened to my son it could possibly happen to your child. Unless your child is a star athlete - even one who cheated on exams in a huge cheating scandal. Those types of Cadets are still there, but MY son likely will get the boot. If your child is at WP or considering going, don't ever let them go to a doctor at WP.
 
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Impulsive

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It makes me wonder if Big Army routinely med-separates pre-comm and boot camp folks expeditiously, and someone decided no more sweetheart deals for those special people at WP - this is pure speculation, only because I have seen my share of tunnel-vision decision-making roll down the hill in my direction often enough.
I can tell you from knowledge, that indeed recruits do get "expeditiously" discharged if ANYTHING arises during Basic Training that disqualifies them. BUT they, having served one day of AD are eligible for VA benefits and usually are granted them. As for Pre-Comm students, SA, OCS/OTS, or DC I am not sure, but I think it on a case by case basis.

Always a good idea to seek out advice from a Veterans Service Organization Benefits Officer and see what can be done.
 

shock-n-awe

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Seems odd that he made it through DODMERB with full disclosure of the prior skin condition. Apparently it acted up badly enough to go on sick call, and has now been determined to be severe enough of a condition to force medical separation.
There may be an appeal process worth looking into.
I would suggest refraining from bringing up other Cadets and future Cadets into the conversation. It won’t help your cause.
You are correct in that his future is in God’s hands….
Best of luck!
 

Humey

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Humey, sorry about the delay in my reply.

I think I remember hearing about the drastic reduction in AFROTC cadets invited to summer training. I'm definitely not in favor of the knee-jerk reaction and poor planning associated with drastic force changes that don't look beyond the current threat assessment, and the associated costs that come with dramatic up-scaling and drawdowns (example: bonuses to go active and early retirement incentives).

As you mention, the invitation to ROTC field training comes between the 2nd and 3rd year. That makes the academy situation different. After that summer at one of the academies, if a cadet hasn't resigned or been separated for deficiency in the academic, military and/or physical category (and every class loses between 100-200 cadets to these circumstances) before this point, they are "invited" to affirm and if they do that, they incur an obligation of 10 years (remaining time at the academy and eight years of active and inactive service). My cadet was far beyond this point and had completed the last year of summer military training. Again, according to tradition and recent practice, a medical disqualification during the senior year, before the current command's "No Golden Handshake" policy, would have allowed for graduation. Had the separation occurred in the first two years, before academic major classes had begun, my cadet was advised by a straight-talking counselor at one of the competitive (low freshman acceptance rates) universities that transferring to a competitive university would have been much easier had two or more years remained until completion of the bachelor's degree. This is due to the tuition and fees the university would have earned combined with the time being spent at the university and the impression the university's culture would have made on the person transferring. In a nutshell, competitive universities were not interested in a cadet who only had a year of time remaining until graduation. That would not be enough time to "imbue" the graduate with the traditions and values of the university.

It's true, that a ROTC student who is not invited to field training may not have the funds necessary to stay at an expensive competitive university. I would imagine, however, that the university would endeavor to keep an admitted student in that case and help with additional financial aid. But if not, they would certainly be welcomed at other universities given that two years remained until the bachelor's degree and the student had not even begun their academic major.

With the new "No Golden Handshake" policy, one might imagine that the command at USMA would be amenable to offering assistance in transferring to another university to medically disqualified seniors. As already mentioned, my cadet was told four days after the initial diagnosis that they would be separated and not one finger has been lifted to assist my cadet transfer. Never mind that a classmate of mine consulted an Army JAG General Officer on this case, who said that my cadet "was not being given due process," I am under the impression that the command views helping transfer to competitive universities medically disqualified senior cadets who are separated may counter the overall objective of the "No Golden Handshake" policy which is to provide a disincentive to cadets seeking a medical disqualification and not commissioning and thus avoiding their obligation. Excuse my optimism, but I don't believe there are many cadets who are seeking to graduate and not commission, and certainly, this is not the case in my cadet's situation given the commissioning disqualification is due the diagnosis of chronic and lifelong medical condition.
I too am sorry for my delay in responding. Honestly never saw it. I realize what happened to your son is way more dramatic (wrong word) compared to losing your scholarship at the start of year 3. My point was you can get screwed over with both situations and there is never a guarantee. . Obviously attending four years and then not being able to graduate is much worse than losing a scholarship at year 2. NOt sure what you can say to make anyone feel better about this situation. I would assume some of the classes will transfer but many wont so he will now have to basically do another 3 years of classes while dealing with the emotional impact of not only commissioning but not graduating. I really wish him luck and while the next 3-4 years may suck, its will only be a blip in his life.
 

Charlene711

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Seems odd that he made it through DODMERB with full disclosure of the prior skin condition. Apparently it acted up badly enough to go on sick call, and has now been determined to be severe enough of a condition to force medical separation.
There may be an appeal process worth looking into.
I would suggest refraining from bringing up other Cadets and future Cadets into the conversation. It won’t help your cause.
You are correct in that his future is in God’s hands….
Best of luck!
NOTHING has changed in his skin or general health. In a previous post, I mentioned how he had gone to the WP dermatologist about itchy scalp which is dandruff shampoo wasn't addressing. That is how this non-issue became an issue. But his itchy scalp is not at all related to his early childhood skin condition. He has had no issues related to the skin condition for probably 12 years, but the fact that he was ever diagnosed as a 3-month-old baby and that it's on his record is cause enough for them to possibly discharge him. In this case it seems that ANY health related 'issue' on record could be a cause for discharge. But I would think that many a cadet has SOMETHING on their health record - from asthma to allergies - that are more significant than this non-issue early childhood skin disorder that my son has.
 

Heatherg21

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NOTHING has changed in his skin or general health. In a previous post, I mentioned how he had gone to the WP dermatologist about itchy scalp which is dandruff shampoo wasn't addressing. That is how this non-issue became an issue. But his itchy scalp is not at all related to his early childhood skin condition. He has had no issues related to the skin condition for probably 12 years, but the fact that he was ever diagnosed as a 3-month-old baby and that it's on his record is cause enough for them to possibly discharge him. In this case it seems that ANY health related 'issue' on record could be a cause for discharge. But I would think that many a cadet has SOMETHING on their health record - from asthma to allergies - that are more significant than this non-issue early childhood skin disorder that my son has.
On the face of what you state this seems insane.
 

Classof83

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My son is in his second year and will likely be medically separated because of a childhood skin disorder that is no longer even an issue in his life. He had multiple full ride scholarships to other colleges, but he turned them down because he wanted to go to West Point. When applying, my son was up front about this childhood issue and he was still accepted. Only now are they making a big deal of it without any basis. I know that West Point does not hold his future in their hands - ultimately God does. However, my son feels called to military service and as he is a National Merit Scholar, having studied the military and its history since he was a young child, I have difficulty seeing him just joining the regular Army outside of West Point. He's ranked #162 out of 1,180 cadets - top 15%. He's been invited by WP leaders to numerous academic travel activities but he turned them down to pursue a leadership position that would be more helpful for him in a military career. We will know by early March whether they will separate him or not but we are all very frustrated because he does not have any health issues and yet they have made up their mind to end his career with no real basis for doing so. And we have no recourse or say in the matter, despite my son's meeting with numerous people regarding this.

Charlene711, I am so, so sorry to hear this! Unfortunately, from our experience, I can believe what is happening to your cadet. When my cadet was first diagnosed, there appeared to be a schism in the medical authority with one siding with my cadet but another, higher ranking, fervently pushing for immediate separation. We also felt that with the immediate separation of our cadet, less due process was given than that provided to cadets who had been accused of cheating and sexual assault.

This case just demonstrates the point that I made in my initial post that forgoing other opportunities in lieu of West Point can, at the very least, lead to a major setback in trying to complete a degree, given the current environment of quickly separating any cadet with the hint of a medical issue. As I also mentioned, we appealed to many influential people and had legal assistance. No one could understand the inflexible stance the command took. As I confirmed just this week, our U.S. Senator has again contacted the Army for an explanation on West Point's refusal to allow my firstie cadet to graduate.

With all that said, I hope common sense prevails in the case of your cadet, and I encourage you to keep up the fight. After our cadet was denied reinstatement, one prominent member of the command, who was a former instructor and mentor of my cadet, wrote in an email that he was proud that my cadet had fought back against the unfair treatment.

Unfortunately, I feel our stories are just the tip of the proverbial iceberg as far as medical separations at West Point are concerned. As I posted earlier, LTG (Ret) H.R. McMaster brought this issue up at a WP BOV meeting in Dec. of 2020.
 
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exodus

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really scary. what about injury? does that cause automatic medical separation?
 
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