Medically disqualified during AFROTC but want to serve

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by SmithCincy, Apr 21, 2017.

  1. SmithCincy

    SmithCincy New Member

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    I was an AFROTC cadet for 3 semesters, I had to take my medical test my 200 year and I told the absolute truth which was that I was taking medicine to manage anxiety (or better known, anti-depressants). I was then disqualified a week before the end of the semester, my cadre used every waiver and called in every favor they could. I didn't know that telling the truth about that medication would get me MD'd. I am not depressed, never have been and the only reason I was taking the anxiety medicine was because my doctor said it would relieve my stress, and to be honest, I was falsely prescribed it, I never actually needed it and it didn't really help much. I study Aerospace engineering, I'm on a 5 year program and currently wrapping up my 3rd year. I was a top performing cadet, was the physical fitness officer assistant, scored 100's on pfa, scored very high on asvab (especially on pilot, I wanted to go CSO). I have a void in my life that was the air force, I want to know if people know how to go about trying to get into OTS, if I have a real shot at aCSO slot like I did with AFROTC and if people think it's even worth it with technology replacing people. Aerospace Engineering major, GPA:3.56
     
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  2. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 5-Year Member

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    Telling the truth did not get you DQ'ed - that was the right thing to do and is expected - but the nature of the diagnosis and medication did.

    You clearly are a motivated achiever who has run into a DQ issue that has not been waived.

    Whether USAFA, AFROTC, OTS or other commissioning program, there will be Q or DQ standards evaluated by DODMERB, with the Service determining whether to waive or not per internal policy.

    If you haven't looked at this, see p. 48:
    http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/613003p.pdf

    You can see there are time factors involved.

    Many who encounter these situations have used a fee-based company called DODMERB Consulting. I am in no position to endorse or recommend them, just making you aware they exist. They specialize in assessing DQ cases and how to help you present the best possible case to gain a waiver or give you their expert opinion on whether you have a shot.

    http://m.dodmerbconsultants.com/?url=http://www.dodmerbconsultants.com/&utm_referrer=#2792

    Don't give up just yet if it is still in your heart to try for an AF commission.

    Edit:
    I am sure you have looked at the OTS web pages. Somewhere in that process you will fill out a medical history, same questions. I think a DODMERB review is good for two years, so clearly prior exams stay in the system. Getting your DODMERB ducks in a row, if it looks like you have a chance of overcoming the DQ in a year or two, and talking candidly with an OTS officer recruiter, will be the foundation to your campaign going forward.

    https://www.airforce.com/how-to-join/process/officer
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2017
    mintyicedtea and Sled like this.
  3. Pima

    Pima 5-Year Member

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    I would also talk to a recruiter because I believe when you apply for OTS you will be asked if you were ever enrolled in officer program, such as USAFA or ROTC. In your case you would respond as yes, and depending on far along you were in ROTC there should be some type of paperwork.

    Once you get to 10 posts I would suggest you pm Mabry on the forum regarding this issue. He is a doc in the military and may have more insight.

    My concern for you is that if you get a rated slot you will do a more in depth medical exam. It is called the FC1 flight physical. The AF will send you to Wright Pat for a 3 day TDY. One day is an all day exam. It will include everything from an EKG to vision to dental, etc. The 2nd day will be a short physical with a flight doc.

    Just saying even if you do clear the DoDMERB you may not clear the FAA FC1 since there are different requirements that are set forth by the FAA. In essence you need to pass both.
     
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  4. Aulysses

    Aulysses Member

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    It can depend on the specific medication you were prescribed. It may be possible that a signed statement from the prescribing Dr. stating that you no longer need the medication could be helpful.
     
  5. I-am-Will

    I-am-Will Member

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    I can attest to the flight physical. They really dig deep into your medical profile to check if everything is squared away. I was at WP for the whole week due to having to do additional tests.
    Passing your DoDMERB exam and passing a flight physical are two completely different things.
     
  6. Pima

    Pima 5-Year Member

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    I know what you mean I-am-Will. Our DS and @25% of his group had to do an EEG because their EKG results were not within limits. Talk about causing heart rates to go up. I believe DS said 2 failed the EEG and were medically DQd out of his group. Luckily DS was fine, but we were on pins and needles that day waiting to hear from him.
     

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