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Discussion in 'Nominations' started by Camnaim58, Feb 24, 2019.

  1. Camnaim58

    Camnaim58 New Member

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    Hello, all. I am currently a junior in high school who turns 17 within the next month. I was recently accepted into the Naval Academy Summer Seminar, and have interest in all the academies, but I still have some questions that I would like an immediate answer to I cannot find on my own.

    How early can and should I apply for a congressional nomination? I really want to do this as early as possible, as it seems to be the most difficult part of the nomination process.

    As someone who wants to practice law, how much of an uphill climb is that through any of the academies?

    How can I get my service be deferred for law school?

    How early can I start my overall application?

    Thank you to all.
     
  2. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Mod note:
    Moving this thread to the Nominations forum in reference to the OP's primary question.
     
  3. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

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  4. A1Janitor

    A1Janitor Banned

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    As far as nominations go ... we contacted our MOC and Senators and they put us on a list. They sent the applications out (I think August) and had their own set of rules and dates.

    You are jumping the gun on the nomination part I think.

    I would start working on the CFA and SATs and ACTs. :)
     
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  5. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    Good advice to read all the Stickies and browse this Nominations forum.

    Your primary sources of info on elected officials’ noms will be on their websites. Many host information sessions. They can organize the process any way they wish.

    If you haven’t yet read every page, dropdown and link at USNA.edu, I strongly recommend it. That is your primary source, and many answers are there.

    The Navy JAG Corps gets most of its officers through direct commissioning programs and civilian colleges and law schools. If you study the USNA website, you will see the focus is on producing line officers for the warfare specialties, a small handful for restricted line and certain staff corps, another small handful for medical school. USNA grads are expected to head to the Fleet or Corps after graduation and start their training pipeline or report to an operational assignment.

    You can go to USNA, but it is highly likely you will have to go into one of the usual warfare specialties. After a certain period of time and stellar performance, you can apply to the Navy’s Law Education (LEP) program and compete for a slot, attend law school full-time, returning as a JAG officer. As I noted above, the majority of Navy JAGs attend civilian college and law school; LEP is extremely competitive and much smaller numbers of JAGs commission that way.

    Various links below, the LEP program for the competitive program for AD officers, and the programs for direct commission and civilian schools.

    http://www.jag.navy.mil/careers_/careers/opportunities_lep.html

    http://www.jag.navy.mil/careers_/careers/opportunities_sp.html

    http://www.jag.navy.mil/careers_/careers/opportunities_da.html

    http://www.jag.navy.mil/careers_/careers/opportunities_ipp.html

    If you want to be a Navy or Marine Corps JAG, doing it via USNA is a long and uncertain path. If you’re not finding info on USNA.edu about going JAG, there are very good reasons for that.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019
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  6. Impulsive

    Impulsive Member

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    @Capt MJ, Ma'am you are on point as usual. One of our twins also wants to go the JAG route. I can't speak for USNA as Capt MJ already has, but we were told if our son attends USMA that it is VERY similar. He would have to either make O-3 or be on the O-3 list even to be eligible, and then is it EXTREMELY competitive. Almost every service gets the majority of it's JAG's from Direct Commissioning, more cost effective, less time lost, and no chance of failing law school since you have already finished it. Our son also looked at AROTC and was told almost the same thing, that he would Commission, go into the field, and then possibly be able to attend Law School (his ROTC is at a University that admits graduates directly into Law School if qualified) if he chose Active Duty. If he chose Reserve Commissioning, it may be possibly to go right from ROTC into Law School (because he could maintain his Reserve commitment), then basically go Active Duty after completion of Law School and go directly into JAG. He would owe the Army two years AD for every year in Law School if the Army pays for it.
     
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  7. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    Indeed very similar, and nice to have a current anecdote relating to Army, USMA and AROTC.
     
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  8. usna1985

    usna1985 10-Year Member

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    Keep in mind that there is PLENTY of time to practice law. Quite a few folks complete their military obligation (or more -- even a career of 20 years), then go to law school.

    Going JAG directly out of most (if not all) SAs is impossible. Doing it while on active duty as a SA graduate is very, very difficult. If your heart's desire is to become a JAG, you are much better off going to a civilian school and then applying to a military program that will pay for your law school education in exchange for X years of service. If you simply want to practice law, attending a SA doesn't preclude that -- you just have to wait a bit and may find that time is well spent.
     
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  9. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    Great point by @usna1985. I had a friend who served a full career in the Navy, 26 years, then used the Post-9/11 GI Bill to attend a prestigious law school. She now works for a non-profit serving vets and loves what she does. Though it may seem that someone is tottering at grave’s edge after a full military career, I assure you that perspective does change as you gain years.

    If you want to be a military JAG, the usual and direct route is through direct commission from civilian schools. If you are open to serving in other paths first, sure, apply to SAs and ROTC, and take advantage of law ed programs further down the road.
     
  10. Old Navy BGO

    Old Navy BGO 5-Year Member

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    Keep in mind, the mission of the Naval Academy is to produce LINE officers. You will not get a deferment of service to attend law school. If you don't want to serve as a Line officer , then USNA is probably not the place for you.